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University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



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Commencement dumber 



June, t9U 






* 



Saint Mary'sl&hool Library 






3 '2 £-.3 



13 






The St. Mary's Muse. 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 
Vol. XVI. June, 1911. No. 1 

The Sixty-ninth Commencement. 



Smiling skies, interested friends, and a series of pleasing events will 
make the remembrance of the Sixty-ninth Commencement linger long 
in the minds of the six graduates, the unusually large number of certifi- 
cate pupils, and the school girls generally. 

The Commencement sermon on Sunday, an earnest, helpful message, 
straight from the heart, by the Rt. Rev. Frederick F. Reese, Bishop of 
Georgia, father of one of our girls this year, was a beautiful beginning 
of a happy season. 

The events on Monday were the annual Art Exhibit in the afternoon 
and the Expression Recital at night when "The Rivals" was ably pre- 
sented before a large and appreciative audience. On Tuesday the an- 
nual meeting of the Alumnae Association was held in the afternoon, and 
at night there was an unusually large attendance at the Rector's Recep- 
tion in the Parlor. 

The Class Day exercises on Wednesday morning had some novel and 
attractive features, noticeably the procession from East Rock to the 
Grove, forming, as it marched, the year 1911. Some of the hits were 
vociferously applauded, notably those in reference to our member of 
the Faculty so soon to become a Benedick. As far as outsiders may be 
permitted to hazard an opinion, the meeting of the Trustees was unusu- 
ally satisfactory, as they adjourned this year in full time to join with a 
large audience in enjoying the Concert in the Auditorium at night. 

Commencement Day itself, Thursday, was full of events ; the brief 
but effective Salutatory and Valedictory, the thoughtful Essay, the able 
address of Dr. Mims, the usual announcement of promotions and 
awards, in the Auditorium ; the beautiful procession to the Chapel, the 
sweet parting service with the delivery of diplomas and the farewell 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



message from the Bishop of North Carolina, the partings and messages, 
and then finally the crowds at the depot— and the Sixty-ninth Com- 
mencement was a thing of the past. 
From the News and Observer: 

THE BEGINNING OF COMMENCEMENT. 

On Sunday morning the Chapel at St. Mary's was filled with relatives and 
friends of the pupils and with those taking a deep interest in the institution, in- 
eluding several of the trustees. The procession of the girls from the main building 
to the Chapel and into it was a beautiful sight, the students all in white making a 
charming picture. As they entered, the processional hymn was "0 Heavenly Jeru- 
salem, of Everlasting Halls." First came the choir followed by Rev. George W. Lay, 
the rector, then the Rt. Rev. Frederick Reese, Bishop of Georgia, and the Rt. Rev. 
Joseph Blount Cheshire, Bishop of North Carolina, and after these the students and 
members of the faculty. 

The beginning of the ante-communion office was said by the Bishop of Georgia, 
the Epistle was read by Rev. George W. Lay, and the Gospel by the Bishop of 
North Carolina, after this coming the sermon by Bishop Reese, who spoke without 
manuscript. It was a strong, helpful sermon, with a clear message coming from 
the heart, and the general expression seemed to be that this was one of the best 
sermons ever preached at a St. Mary's Commencement. It made a deep impression 
on the minds and hearts of all who were so fortunate as to hear it. Bishop Reese, 
whose home is in Savannah, has held his high office for some five years, for about 
fifteen years previously having been rector of Christ Church at Macon, Ga. His 
pulpit presence is attractive, his voice clear and pleasing, his face indicating intel- 
lectual strength. He is about fifty-five years of age and is to be classed as a forceful 
speaker, holding the close attention of his hearers. 

THE BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 

Bishop Reese took for his text the words of the seventeenth verse of the third 
chapter of the Epistle of St. Paul to the Colossians: "And whatever ye do in word 
or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God and the Father 
by Him." He began by saying, "I wish to give a message to you, young ladies, sim- 
ply and briefly, to help you in your lives." These words, he continued, are not 
a mere pious expression, but they give a rule in life. It is a great thing in life 
to have a great truth engraven in the heart as a rule of life. Older people have 
gone a long way on the road; they have met difficulties; their message, therefore, 
to the young, is to give them the benefit of their experience. The message of 
life, with its trials, its disappointments, its human experiences, is going to form 
your character. But the most important thing is not the set of circumstances 
or the peculiar experiences; it depends upon the attitude of the spirit, upon the 
point of view, the creative, life-giving spirit in us. "You can make life largely 
what you want it to be." The experience is determined by the attitude with 
which you meet it. You are going to form character. You need, therefore, to be 
guided, and here in this text is a guiding motive. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



"There are three things to be considered. First, whatsoever you do, whatever, in 
all activities, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus. What does the text give? A 
supreme ideal." Bishop Reese then spoke of the importance of ideals ; that to 
dream dreams and to see visions is the peculiar power of the young, that they must 
have them, that "this is not the only world — in it are the dreams, the spirit, the 
hope, the fancy of a better world." He declared that man's whole ideal is after a 
better world, "a city whose Maker and Builder is God" ; that "we must have a 
divine impatience," that everything we do is in the capacity to realize what we are 
striving for. This thought he emphasized with the story of the sculptor, Thor- 
waldsen; that a friend once found him weeping and asked him, "What's the matter? 
You have just finished a beautiful statue." And the reply was, "That's the matter ; I 
am too well satisfied. I have lost my ideal." Applying this, he said that "Be ye 
perfect even as your Father in heaven is perfect" — that this is our ideal, a very high 
one, and it discourages us in one sense. The Christian religion, he said, is in one 
sense, discouraging, when we realize the high ideals which are to be attained, but it 
tells us of the spirit and possibilities in us. The man's, the girl's ambition is never 
satisfied as long as he lives; he strives for perfection. "Do all in the name of the 
Lord Jesus," His standard of perfection, of character, of manhood, of purity. We 
need just such a standard; otherwise we become careless and discouraged, losing faith 
and hope and courage. But the beauty of our religion is that the ideal is always 
before us and we have the help of Jesus. "Take that as your working principle in 
life; there is such an ideal in all life. If the ideal is low or sordid, the life is low; 
or if it is high and beautiful, the life will be correspondingly high and beautiful. 
So the first point is a supreme ideal." 

The second is a great and noble service. We should do something greater and 
better than ourselves. This solves selfishness. Some German writer has said, "All 
sin is selfishness." Then the Bishop, as an illustration of noble service and devotion, 
referred to our wars, especially that of the sixties, saying that the keynote in both 
the North and the South was self-sacrifice. "There is a book called 'The Joy of the 
Cross.' There is such a joy as self-sacrifice." Xo man or woman has ever been 
completely inspired in a subject without realizing the beauty of giving one's self to 
it. The great danger is that of losing the significance of our lives ; it is easy for 
us to think our lives are insignificant; that we have no special work to do; that 
we are too commonplace. He declared "a thing is great according to its moral or 
spiritual significance," and called attention to George Eliot's "Mill on the Floss," the 
story of how Tom and Maggie fought out a great tragedy of human life, although 
perfectly simple people in simple surroundings. The danger is in getting common- 
place, in thinking things so small, of asking what difference does it make whether 
we do what is right, our lives are so insignificant. As to the thought, "What dif- 
ference does it make to God in view of small lives whether I do my duty or not?" he 
declared, it is all important. 

He dwelt on the importance of little things in making character, that God is in- 
terested in all our little things, in how we are doing them, and asked if this thought 
would not help us to make our lives better, purer, more useful. "The world is 
strewed with waterlogged wrecks who think it makes no difference to God and the 
world what they do or don't do." Every act is significant. In the locomotive 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



every part is important; one little weak point may be the weakness of the 
whole. The workman who makes the bolt may not realize that, and yet the 
bolt may be the weak point that brings disaster to many. We don't realize the 
perfected plan, God's purpose. If the poor workman sees the real purpose he 
will make a good bolt. It is natural for us to feel that about our life, that our 
little household duties are so insignificant, but that is where we fail to realize that 
God's purpose runs through all, and all actions, great or small, must be done well. 
We must do it for God. "Whatsoever ye do, do it all in the name of the Lord." 
The lesson of history is that what makes the world better is the good lives of simple 
people, their service and self-sacrifice. This is the divine ideal. Every duty, house- 
keeping, sewing, all service, are a part of the great plan. Here he told the story of 
a little girl who when asked if she was a Christian answered she thought she was, 
and on being asked "Why?" said, "Why, I always sweep under the mats." That is 
the idea, to do one's duty, honestly, faithfully. 

As the third point Bishop Reese spoke of the inspiration of a great and supreme 
affection, that love is the greatest motive in the world, that it draws out unselfish 
devotion. The love of Jesus does that; it is the motive power. He emphasized this 
in telling of service to others as being inspired by love, and gave the story of the 
wounded soldier of Napoleon who told the surgeon probing for the bullet, "Doctor, 
probe a little deeper and you'll find the Emperor." That was a lesson of devotion. 
He quoted also the remark of Napoleon, "I'll be forgotten, but this Jesus Christ is 
strong now after two thousand years." He told also of the devotion of the soldiers 
in the Southern army to "Uncle Bob," General Lee. 

He declared we should look on life as a great privilege and give thanks for it; 
that gratitude is one of the most beautiful of human flowers, one of the last to 
come, that gratitude is the sign of a noble life. 

In conclusion, he said that these things that had been said were not pious plati- 
tudes, but leading motive powers in life, supreme ideals, motives and love for a 
leader, his closing words being, "May God bless each and all of you, and may you 
feel His love for you and give it back to Him in devotion. Realize the dignity of 
your lives, humble dignity, to enable your lives to contribute to service as He gives 
you opportunity." 

The alms were then taken up for the use of the Bishop of Georgia in his work, 
after which, with Bishop Reese as the celebrant, there took place the celebration of 
the Holy Communion. At the close of the service the student body passed from the 
church, the recessional hymn being, "0 Mother Dear, Jerusalem, When Shall I Come 
to Thee?" 

At the 5 o'clock service the Bishop gave another helpful and inspiring message, 
suggested by the text, "Be ye also ready," with the leading thoughts that this world 
is beautiful, full of beautiful opportunities for service, but that to use them we 
must be ready, we must be prepared; that our youth, our school days, are days of 
preparation for greater opportunities. 

THE ART EXHIBIT. 

The annual art exhibit, which is displayed in the large studio on the second floor 
of the Art Building, was the center of attraction Monday afternoon from four to six, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



when it was thrown open to the visitors who arrived in goodly numbers. The ex- 
hibit will again be on display Wednesday evening after the annual concert. 

Many of the visitors consider this exhibit the best made in some years, which is 
high praise when it is remembered that the Art Department of St. Mary's has time 
and again made a display of which it might well be proud. 

There are this year two certificate pupils in art, Miss Nell Lewis of Raleigh and 
Miss Rebecca Wood of Edenton, and their work is most prominent in the exhibit. 
Miss Lewis's apothecary group and her apples and brass bowl group show almost 
perfect projection and excellent work in the high lights and shadows. Miss Wood's 
touch is a little more delicate than Miss Lewis's, and is at her best in her scarlet 
sage group and in her excellent time-sketches. In her heavier group of books, maga- 
zines, etc., her eye for perspective also gives excellent results. 

The work of the second-year pupils is also excellent, especially worthy of mention 
being the excellent charcoal drawings of the Winged Victory by Misses Patsey Smith 
and Evelyn Maxwell. 

Among the special students, Miss Margaret Barber's work in oils shows up very 
well. Her study of peanuts and dates is very realistic and her colors are mixed 
wonderfully well for her violet study. Miss Henrietta Schwartz shows more than 
usual ability in blending her colors and in softening her lines in her watercolor 
sketches. Miss Elizabeth Tarry's work in china is well worthy of notice. 

The exhibit is a full one and covers the field from the elementary object drawings 
of the first class through the advanced oil work, and in every department the work 
is truly artistic. 

The exhibit reflects much credit on the director of the department, Miss Clara 
Fenner, and is the best evidence of her ability to create in her students a love for 
the work, a true feeling for the artistic, and a satisfaction only with the best. 

The Elocution Recital. 

On the evening of May 22d, the Elocution Department, assisted by 
members of the Dramatic Club, gave a most enjoyable performance of 
Sheridan's old eighteenth century play, "The Rivals." Miss Victor, 
under whose direction the play was presented, is to be warmly congratu- 
lated on the results of her work. 

Frederika Gilbert made a most appropriately tempestuous Sir An- 
thony Absolute, and Elizabeth Tarry played remarkably well the part 
of Mrs. Malaprop, whose pride in her "parts of speech" and in her 
"nice derangement of epitaphs" furnishes a never cloying amusement. 
The laughter of the artful maid (Virginia Divine) over her "simplic- 
ity" was irresistibly contagious, and the fright of the boasting Bob 
Acres, simulated by Mary Owen, was hardly less provocative of laughter. 
Among the other actors should be mentioned Tinsley Harrison, who 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 

has more than once in the past three years acted the part of the heroine 

with unusual ease and spirit. T. 

The following is the cast: 

CHARACTERS. 

Sir Anthony Absolute Miss Frederika Gilbert 

Captain Absolute Miss Helen McArthur 

Faulkland Miss Helen Jackson 

Acres Miss Mary Owen 

Sir Lucius O'Trigger Miss Katherine Parker 

Fag Miss Nell Lewis 

Miss Lydia Languish Miss Tinsley Harrison 

Mrs. Malaprop ( her Aunt) Miss Elizabeth Tarry 

Julia Miss Amelia Clarkson 

Lucy Miss Virginia Divine 

The Alumnae Meeting and the Rector's Reception. 

[From the Neivs and Observer.] 

THE ALUMNA MEETING. 

The annual meeting of St. Mary's Alumnae Association was held in the afternoon 
in the Art Building. The meeting was called to order at 4:30 by the President, 
Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp. 

The Secretary, Miss Kate McKimmon, read the minutes of last year's meeting, 
after which Mrs. Shipp, in a brief address, outlined the work which had been accom- 
plished the past year under her presidency. 

The report of the Treasurer, Miss Martha A. Dowd, showed some $1,500 on hand 
for the scholarship fund and other conditions satisfactory. Her resignation as 
Treasurer was received with great regret. 

Officers for 1911-12 were chosen as follows: President, Mrs. A. W. Knox, of 
Raleigh ; Vice-President, Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, of Richmond, Va. ; Secretary, 
Miss Kate McKimmon (re-elected) ; Treasurer, Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, of Raleigh; 
members of the Alumnae Council — for three years, Mrs. William E. Shipp and Miss 
Sarah Cheshire, of Raleigh; for two years, Mrs. R. C. Strong, of Raleigh. 

Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, of West Durham, was made Honorary Vice-President, 
and Miss Anna N. Buxton, of Winston-Salem, Traveling Secretary. 

Mrs. Annie Haywood Ruffin, of Raleigh, was made an honorary member of the 
association, she being the sole surviving member of the "original thirteen" girls 
present when St. Mary's opened its doors in 1842. 

The Rector addressed the alumnse briefly, emphasizing the need of the $100,000 
endowment. 

Reports from the local chapters were made by Mrs. Theo. F. Davidson for Ashe- 
ville, Mrs. M. T. Leak for Durham, and Miss Lizzie Lee for Raleigh. 

Mrs. Mary Iredell, the Honorary President of the Association, made a plea for 
greater alumnae support of The Muse, the alumnae publication. 

The Association then adjourned. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Among the out-of-town alumnae present besides those mentioned were Mrs. R. R. 
Mobley of Reidsville, Miss Emma Karrer of Mayodan, Miss Josephine Osborne of 
Charlotte. 

THE RECTOR'S RECEPTION. 

From 8:30 to 10 last night the Rector's reception to the students, alumnae and 
visitors, and in honor of the graduating class, was held in the parlor, which was 
prettily decorated for the occasion. The event was a most delightful one in every 
way. 

Receiving the guests were the Rector and Mrs. Lay, Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire, 
Miss Thomas, the Lady Principal, Miss McKimmon, and the members of the gradu- 
ating class, Misses Xell Battle Lewis, Mary Rebecca Merritt, Ina Hoskins Jones, Lula 
Everett Parker, Isabel Hester Perry and Josephine Pearl Tonnoffski. 

Ice cream and wafers were served during the reception. 

Among the out-of-town guests were Bishop Reese of Georgia ; Rev. Louis G. Wood 
of Charleston and Mr. Frank A. Clinard of Hickory, who are here for the meeting 
of the Trustees this afternoon ; Mrs. W. W. Barber of Wilkesboro, Mrs. R. M. Mc- 
Arthur of Winston-Salem, Mrs. R. H. Northrop of Wilmington, Miss Penelope Slade 
of Columbus, Ga. ; Miss Ida Rogerson of Edenton, Miss Kate Northrop of Wilming- 
ton, Miss Nan Cuthbert of Petersburg, Va.; Miss Lilner Beale of Franklin, Va.; 
Miss Lucy Mann of Middleton, Mrs. Theo. F. Davidson of Asheville, Mrs. R. R. 
Mobley of Reidsville, Miss Mary Shuford of Hickory, and others. 

CLASS DAY EXERCISES. 

"Class Day" at St. Mary's this year was an unusually attractive one. Beneath 
the stately oaks on the campus, almost in front of Main Building, seats were 
arranged for the class of 1911 and its many friends. 

Just at 11 o'clock a line composed of the classes of 1911, 1912, 1913 and 1914, 
slowly issued from East Rock House and after having formed in its line of march, the 
figures 1911, during which time the different classes joined in singing "Alma Mater," 
wound itself in front of the guests, where the classes took their assigned places. 

The President, Josephine Tonnoffski, welcomed everyone in a few very cordial and 
fitting words, to which responses were made by Tinsley Harrison for the Junior 
class, Nellie Hendricks for the Sophomores, Anne Field for the Freshmen, and Bessie 
Folk for the Preps. 

One of the most charming features of the program was the reading of the prophecy, 
the truths of which were brought before one by living pictures ; one need not try to 
imagine one's friend as a ballet girl, for there she was dressed as such, and she was 
not the only one, for there was the nun, the woman voter, the society girl, and the 
Shakespeare reader — all dressed accordingly and all mirroring the class of 1911, to 
itself and to others. 

Of course the will had to be read, too, and in Isabel Perry's hands that was very 
cleverly managed — St. Mary's can easily profit by what 1911 has left her. To Mr. 
Cruikshank, 191 l's honorary member, Miss Perry gave 191 l's best wishes and some 
token of its regard for him. 

Finally came the planting of the class ivy in front of the Main Building. Taking 
up its daisy chain and following its President, the class assembled in front of the. 
Main Building and, during the singing of the class song, planted the emblem which 
stands for eternal devotion. 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Class Day Notes. 

The ivy planted by the Senior Class was sent direct by Mrs. Col. 
A. B. Andrews from Mt. Vernon, where she was attending a meeting of 
the Regents ; her wish for the Senior class being, "that their patriotism 
and its growth be most vigorous." 

Class Day Toasts. 

By the Class of 1912. 
Here's to the outgoing Seniors, 

Whose laurels are already won ; 
May the road on which they have started 

Be followed till their course is done. 

May their life be filled with sunshine, 

May the shadows fall sparsely there, 
May the guiding star of wisdom 

Lead them far from grief and despair. 

By the Class of 1913. 
Our tears of grief are brewing fast 
As from St. Mary's School there pass 
The class who bear, 'mid joy and woe, 
The banner with this great motto — 
Excelsior ! 

In happy homes they'll make the light 
Of household fires gleam warm and bright; 
In school and college they'll make a name, 
While ever in their hearts shall flame — 
Excelsior ! 

But here we Sophomores sigh and grieve 
As now these Seniors take their leave, 
Yet wish whene'er a hill they climb 
They'll still be led by word sublime — 
Excelsior ! 

By the Class of 1914. 

Before you awful Seniors 

We timid Freshmen stand, 
Our hearts are in our throats, 

But we hope you'll understand 
That from those hearts which palpitate 

With wild admiring fear, 
We wish you added happiness 

With each succeeding year. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 9 

By the Preps. 

Here's to the dignified Seniors — that's you! 

NoWj what can a poor little Prep like me do, 

But to wish for you all in your journey through life 

The best of its joys and but little of strife? 

Trustees in Session. 

[From the Xews and Observer.] 

The Board of Trustees met in the afternoon and went over the affairs of the 
college for the past year, discussing also plans for the work for the coming year. 
These were the only matters of business that were transacted. 

In attendance were Bishop J. M. Horner of Asheville, Bishop Robert Strange 
of Wilmington, Rev. R. B. Drane of Edenton, Rev. L. G. Wood of Charleston, S. C. ; 
Mr. Frank A. Clinard of Hickory, and Mr. George C. Royall of Goldsboro, the mem- 
bers present from Raleigh being Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, Chairman of the 
Board; Dr. K. P. Battle, Secretary; Rev. Milton A. Barber, Rev. J. E. Ingle, Dr. 
R. H. Lewis, Col. Charles E. Johnson, and Hon. R. H. Battle. 

Annual Concert. 

BRILLIANT ANNUAL CONCERT. 

The concert at St. Mary's last evening was a worthy crown to a year of good 
work in the Music Department. 

All branches of the department were represented, the piano, voice, violin and 
chorus, and the work was in every case admirable and in many cases most 
artistic. The program was varied and attractive. 

There was a large attendance in the Auditorium, and the applause given showed 
that the splendid music rendered was appreciated. The concert was a delightful 
one throughout. The program was: 

PART I. 

1. Concerto in D major — First movement Haydn 

Cadenza by Mertke. 

Miss Ada Burfoot. 
Miss Dorroh at second piano. 

2. (a) Song MaeDowell 

(b) Elfin Dance DuBois 

Miss Mary Gaither. 

3. Garden Scene from "Faust" Elman 

Miss Margaret Locke Erwin. 

4. "La Coquette" Sterne 

Miss Mary Louise Manning. 

5. (a) The Deserted Farm — "Woodland Sketches" MaeDowell 

( b ) The Eagle MaeDowell 

Miss Mary Mitchell Chamberlain. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 

6. (a) Duet of the Stars Chaminade 

( b ) Lullaby Mildenberg 

Chorus. 
Miss Burfoot at the piano. 

PART II. 

1. Allegro moderato from 6th Concerto d'Beriot 

Miss Emilie Rose Knox. 

2. Trio— "Barcarolle" from D'Hoffman Offenbach 

Misses Ethel Williamson, Kate Bragaw and Bessie Barnwell. 

3. Elevation Florsheim 

Miss Amelia Sturgeon. 

4. "Chanson Provencale" Del' Acqua 

Miss Zona Shull. 

5. (a) Waltz in A flat, Op. 34, No. 1 Chopin 

( b ) Etude, Op. 10, No. 5 Chopin 

Miss Ella Dorroh. 

6. "Good Night" Reinecke 

Chorus. 
Miss Burfoot at the piano. 

[From the News and Observer. 1 

The Graduation Exercises and Address. 

With graduating exercises that were of the most delightful kind, the sixty-ninth 
Commencement of St. Mary's School came to a close Thursday morning (May 25th), 
when the diplomas to the class of 1911 were delivered by Bishop Joseph Blount 
Cheshire in the Chapel. This came after the splendid annual address by Dr. Edwin 
Minis of the State University, the award of certificates and honors, and the exercises 
in the Auditorium. 

The Commencement events this year have been unusually delightful, and they 
marked the close of one of the very best years in the life of the School. During 
the past year there have been 156 boarding pupils, with 244 as the total number 
in attendance. The Rector, Rev. George W. Lay, in his remarks paid high tribute 
to the services of the faculty, the work of the pupils, and the co-operation of the 
Trustees. 

The exercises of graduation day began in the Auditorium Thursday morning at 

11 o'clock, there being a large audience in attendance. Throughout, the exercises 
were of the greatest interest, and the appreciation of friends was shown in great 
applause and in the great quantity of beautiful bouquets and great armfuls of 
flowers sent forward to the graduates and honor pupils. The exercises began with 
a vocal quartette, "The Lass With the Delicate Air," of Arne-Shelley; this was 
charmingly rendered by Misses Zona Shull, Marie Thomas, Lucy Dortch and Fred- 
erika Gilbert. 

Then came the salutatory; this was by Miss Josephine Pearl Tonnoffski of 
Raleigh, the second honor graduate. Her salutatory was delightful, expressed in 
graceful terms, a welcome to all, with appreciative remarks concerning the officers 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



and faculty and students. The popularity of the charming young graduate, whose 
high standing has delighted her many friends, was shown by the applause and the 
great numbers of floral tributes sent forward. 

o 

Next, Miss Sarah Fenner rendered most charmingly a piano solo, Grieg's ''Wed- 
ding Procession," and then came the class essay by Miss Xell Battle Lewis of 
Raleigh. Her subject was "The Poetry of Kipling," and the essay was of the 
highest merit. Miss Lewis showed a keen appreciation of the poetry of Kipling, 
and treated of this with discernment and ability. Her criticism showed study and 
an insight into poetic moods and thoughts. The English used was choice, the 
language graphic, the entire essay one of real merit, showing that Miss Lewis 
has high literary ability. There was great applause for Miss Lewis and great 
numbers of beautiful flowers. 

The audience was next delighted by a vocal solo by Miss Zona Shull of Missoula, 
Montana. It was "The Nightingale," by Luders, and in announcing the number 
the Rector, Rev. George W. Lay, who presided, happily said: "We will now have 
the pleasure of hearing 'The Nightingale," Miss Zona Shull"; this pleasantry being 
fulfilled, as Miss Shull has a most bewitching voice. She won great applause, and 
it was deserved. 

INTRODUCING THE SPEAKER. 

The annual address was delivered by Dr. Edwin Minis of the State University, 
and he was happily and wittily introduced by the Rector, who told of the friendly 
relations existing between the student body of St. Mary's and the State University, 
and that this was shared in an official way between the two institutions. He said 
that his personal experience at the State University, where he was called on to 
speak at one time, showed that "St. Mary's School was officially a most acceptable 
person" at the University. In reference to the manner of addressing audiences in 
which there were men and women, he spoke of the "his and her" problem, and how 
this was happily overcome as "the brethren embraced the sisters," and that there 
was a most brotherly feeling of the undergraduates at the University for St. Mary's, 
as also a sisterly feeling of St. Mary's girls for the brethren at the State University. 
He gave a warm welcome to Dr. Minis, who was received with applause. 

ADDRESS OF DR. MIMS. 

Dr. Edwin Minis made an address of great worth. It was on the theme, "Types 
of Southern Women," and it got away from the general line of commencement 
addresses. It was an address that was worth while hearing, one that could not fail 
to be of uplift and help. It was in choice language and made a deep impression. 
Referring to Mr. Lay's remarks on "brethren and sisters," he said that he remem- 
bered as the only part of an address that he had once made on "Woman" that he 
used the expression, "Oh, Woman! Woman!" and that while he would attempt to 
speak on some phase of that eternal problem he had a hesitancy, but that he would 
not enter upon the question of a solution of it. He told of "Mr. Dooley" in a 
second volume of a book having in it "Errata — Whenever in a sentence about a 
woman you find 'is,' substitute 'is not,' and whenever you find 'is not' substitute 
'may be, perhaps, God knows.'" In his address he said in part: 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 

TYPES OF SOUTHERN WOMEN. 

"I can best suggest some points of view with regard to the opportunities and 
advantages of Southern women of the present day by indicating certain concrete 
types, and I will refer to three types of Southern women especially, those of the 
ante-bellum, or 'old South.' The first type is the special theme of the romances, the 
aristocratic women of the old era, and of this type Thomas Nelson Page has given 
the best interpretation. 

"It is easy to say that he idealizes somewhat his heroines, and yet how can we 
resist the charm of 'Polly,' or 'Miss Charlotte,' or 'Meh Lady,' the heroines in his 
'In Old Virginia'? The proper background of such women, old and young, was that 
of groves and ancient trees, green lawns, stately columns and porticoes and polished 
halls. There was in them at their best the combination of social charm, dignity and 
poise. We may even now in passing through the country see old houses whispering 
the last enchantment of the passing age. More recently Owen Wister in 'Lady 
Baltimore' presents two heroines of this type, with Charleston as the background. 

"The second type of the old order was the one of the middle class, notable for her 
piety, hard work and strength of character. She was a familiar figure in the camp- 
meetings; without much education or social charm, she represented the Puritan 
element in Southern life and has been far too much underestimated by the writers 
on Southern life. 

"A third type is that of the forgotten woman, wrinkled in youth from ill-prepared 
food, clad without warmth or grace, living in untidy houses, working from daylight 
till bedtime at the daily round of weary duties and encrusted in a shell of daily 
content with her lot. She was sometimes the mother of a man of genius, but in 
the main she lived in isolation, an unresponsive factor to the social life — yet full 
of possibilities under the process of education and social service. 

"These types of the old order have more or less disappeared as the forces of 
modern life have found their way into the South. The conditions under which the 
first type lived have, of course, vanished; and the second type is as the result of 
modern industry become richer and more powerful, while the third type must play 
an increasing part in the future. 

"Individualism, democracy, nationalism, and education are profoundly modifying 
the conditions in the South, and in these changes, these ideals and conditions of 
women must necessarily change. The great currents of thought are flowing this 
way. Whether they like the changes or not, women are feeling the effect of new 
demands for higher education and social service. We may be able to retain all 
that is best of the charm, piety and the elemental humanity of the older days, but 
these have been to a certain extent modified by forces that have been felt in all 
European countries and in other sections. The so-called emancipation of women, 
which is one of the characteristic movements of the nineteenth century, manifests 
itself in many extreme forms, especially in New England in the middle years of 
the past century, and yet, in spite of certain eccentricities and extremes, many 
needed reforms have been made. Women's colleges and universities have been put 
upon a standard of scholarship equal to those of men, and especially in the large 
universities of the West they have been given the same opportunities and privileges. 

"Furthermore, through their clubs they have become effective in the intellectual 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

and social advancements of the nation. Out of much agitation has come a definite, 
crystalized movement by which the women of the entire nation are playing an 
increasing part in education and literature and science and music and social wel- 
fare; while at the same time they have not left out of consideration the true in- 
terests of the home. As a result of their activities the schools have been made more 
efficient, the schoolhouses and grounds more beautiful, science has been fostered; 
libraries and art galleries have been brought within the reach of many of the less 
fortunate people of the nation. 

"These tendencies througout the nation have been felt to an increasing degree in 
recent years in the South. Women have realized their obligations to democracy in 
which all people should share the privileges of the best. Women authors like Mrs. 
Murfree, Ellen Glasgow, Mary Johnston, and your own Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp. 
have interpreted the life and legends of this section in deeds of action. Many 
teachers in schools and colleges have found the chance for creative work. A striking 
exhibition of the way in which educated women may find joy in the uplift of back- 
ward people is found in Miss Martha Berry's school for mountain boys at Rome, 
Ga., in the notable work done for rural schools by Miss Michaux of Greensboro. In 
their active betterment leagues, school improvement associations and various other 
educational organizations, many have found opportunities of real usefulness. 

"To unmarried women these fields of social service open up splendid opportunities, 
while to married women comes a definite call for the guiding in intelligent and 
sympathetic lines the work of church and society. After all, the test of a college 
like this may be found particularly in the contributions its graduates make to the 
communities. You should go back to your homes and attempt to make conditions 
of farm life satisfactory; to help along in any other legitimate way schools and 
churches and other organizations. You will do this without losing any of the 
womanly qualities that have been the particular characteristics of Southern women. 
In this era of the remaking of our civilization, you may have a commanding part. 
There is no section of the world today which offers such splendid opportunities for 
disinterested and intelligent service as this land of our fathers. Southerners who 
left here in other days are coming back home, the sons of Southerners who went 
away feel the call of the old land; other people are inclined to take advantage of 
these opportunities. Surely, we who live here will have eyes to see the fields which 
are ripe unto the harvest." 

The Rector expressed the pleasure of all at the address of Dr. Mims, and urged 
that the advice given be taken by all the pupils. 

THE VALEDICTORY ADDRESS. 

The Valedictory address was delivered by Miss Rebecca Merritt of Raleigh, the 
first honor graduate, and it was a most pleasing one, expressing in fitting terms the 
regret of the graduates in leaving St. Mary's and the appreciation that was felt 
towards officers and teachers, and the regret in leaving schoolmates. Miss Merritt's 
valedictory was excellent and many flowers were sent to her. 

HONORS, CERTIFICATES AND DISTINCTIONS. 

The Rector then announced the honors, certificates and distinctions. He ex- 
pressed appreciation for the co-operation of the Trustees, the efficient work of the 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 

faculty, and the work of the students, declaring that when they were gone he 
would miss them from the lawns and grove, "the most beautiful of nature's flowers" ; 
that he thought much of all the pupils, that they had done many good things and in 
many ways had tried to do their duty. The year, he said, had been an immeasurably 
good one, and the verdict was that the students were the best-looking girls ever at 
St. Mary's, that they were good looking when they came and had since grown better 
looking. 

The honors were announced as follows: 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Roll of Honor — Virginia Page Royster. 

The following passed all examinations, but owing to continued absence are not 
eligible to the Roll of Honor: Mary Hoke, Elizabeth W. Baker. 

To be Commended — For good work in the studies of the department: Florence 
Leftwich Harrison, Elizabeth Murray. For regular attendance: Virginia Royster 
(absent one day in 1910 and 1911), Anna Rogers Lay, Lucy Fitzhugh Lay. For 
deportment (average 100): Elizabeth M. Cross. 

CERTIFICATES IN BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

Full Certificate awarded to Bessie Blount Winslow of Hertford, N. C. 

In Stenography and Typewriting — Nina Farrow Gibbs, Oriental, N. C; Laura 
Washington Griffith, Charlotte, N. C. ; Louise Sanders, Raleigh, N. C; Marjorie 
Terrell, Raleigh, N. C. 

In Bookkeeping — Margaret Quince, Wilmington, N. C. 

CERTIFICATE IN ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT. 

Agnes Tinsley Harrison, Atlanta, Ga. 

CERTIFICATES IN ART DEPARTMENT. 

Nell Battle Lewis, Raleigh, N. C. ; Rebecca Benehan Wood, Edenton, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES IN MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

In Piano — Julia Borden, Goldsboro, N. C. ; Mary Mitchell Chamberlain, West 
Raleigh, N. C. ; Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon, Cary, N. C. 
In Voice — Zona May Shull, Missoula, Montana. 

CERTIFICATES IN ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. 

Ruth Reynolds Critz, Winston-Salem, N. C. ; Bessie Smedes Erwin, Durham, N. C. ; 
Agnes Tinsley Harrison, Atlanta, Ga. ; Helen Elizabeth McArthur, Winston-Salem, 
N. C.j Rebecca Benehan Wood, Edenton, N. C. 

DIPLOMA IN PIANO. 

Ella Dorroh, Greenville, S. C. 

ACADEMIC PROMOTIONS. 

In the College the promotions were: 

To be Seniors — -Margaret Strange Broadfoot, Nellie Hendricks, Elizabeth Hughes, 
Janie Ruffin Sims, Patsey Harry Smith, Rebecca Benehan Wood. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 

To be Juniors — Carolina Clarke Jones, Caroline Ashe Lockhart, Evelyn Croom 
Maxwell, Fannie Old McMullan, Virginia Selden Prettyman, Anna Cowan Strong, 
Elizabeth Warren Thompson. 

To be Sophomores — Elizabeth Barnwell, Mary Butler, Sarah Fenner, Anne Field, 
Frances Fitchett, Beatrice Fuller, Laura Margaret Hoppe, Louis"e Josey, Kathryn 
Lassiter, Ruth Lee, Elise Lloyd, Melba McCullers, Susan Bawlings, Kate Hale 
Silver, Josephine Smith, Katherine D. Smith, Amelia Sturgeon, Mary Tyson, Myrtle 
Warren, Bessie White, Amy Winston, Jennie Woodruff. 

To be Freshmen — Julia Cooper, Grace Crews, Florence Stone, Frances Strong. 

To be Conditioned Freshmen — Elizabeth A. Lay, Katherine Pender. 

THE HONOR ROLL. 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members of the School, is the 
Honor Roll. The Honor Roll students for 1910-11 are: 

In the Lower Preparatory Department — Elizabeth McMorin Folk. 

In the Upper Preparatory Department — Yvonne Marie Barber. 

In the College — Mary Brown Butler, Hortense Haughton Jones, Mary Rebecca 
Merritt, Josephine Valentine Smith, Patsey Harry Smith, Josephine Pearl Tonnoffski, 
Myrtle Warren, Rebecca Benehan Wood. 

THE BISHOP PARKER BOTANY PRIZE. 

The Bishop Parker Botany Prize, given by Rt. Rev. Edward M. Parker, Bishop 
Coadjutor of New Hampshire, is awarded to that pupil who, in accordance with 
certain published conditions, does the best work in the preparation of an herbarium. 
The prize of 1911 is awarded to Myrtle Warren. 

THE NILES MEDAL. 

The highest award for the work of the session, as determined by a comparison 
of general averages, is the Niles Medal. The medal is awarded in 1911 to Miss Patsey 
Harry Smith of Raleigh, of the class of 1912, whose average for the year is 95.39 
per cent. This announcement was awaited with keen interest, and that it was won 
by a Raleigh girl was a source of pride to all Raleigh people. There was much 
applause and many beautiful flowers for Miss Smith. 

This closed the exercises in the Auditorium, and the presentation of the diplomas 
was made in the Chapel, in which the closing exercises took place. 

PROCESSION TO THE CHAPEL. 

Proceeding to the Chapel the procession was composed of all who had been on 
the stage in the Auditorium, these being the Rector, Rev. George W. Lay; the orator 
of the day, Prof. Edwin Mims; the bishops, Rt. Rev. Frederick F. Reese, Bishop 
of Georgia, and Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, Bishop of North Carolina; and 
members of the Board of Trustees. Bishop Robert Strange, who was present during 
part of the exercises, was compelled to leave in order to make his train for Wil- 
mington. Then there were the members of the faculty and the student body, the 
latter all in white, making a most beautiful picture. 

3 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The processional hymn as the entry into the Chapel was made was, "Ten Thou- 
san Times Ten Thousand." In the Chapel the Scripture lesson was read by Bishop 
Cheshire, after which came the Benedictus, the Creed, and prayer. Then came 
the singing of "Ancient of Days," followed by the presentation of college diplomas. 

There was especial interest in this in Raleigh, as in the graduating class of six 
there were five Raleigh girls, and to three of these came class honors: Miss Rebecca 
Merritt being the valedictorian with first honor, Miss Tonnoffski the salutatorian 
with second honor, and Miss Nell Battle Lewis the class essayist. These were high 
honors for the city. 

THE DIPLOMAS PRESENTED. 

The diplomas were presented by Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, as follows: 
Ina Hoskins Jones of Raleigh, Nell Battle Lewis of Raleigh, Mary Rebecca Merritt 
(first honor) of Raleigh, Lula Everett Parker of West Raleigh, Isabel Hester 
Perry of Henderson, Josephine Pearl Tonnoffski (second honor) of Raleigh. 

THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS. 

Following the presentation of the diplomas, Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire briefly 
addressed the graduates. He stated that the address was to have been by Bishop 
Strange of Wilmington, but that he had been compelled to leave. He complimented 
the addresses made, the essay, the salutatory, the valedictory, and paid high com- 
pliment to the value of the address of Dr. Minis. 

His advice was, to graduates and students, to first go home and enjoy themselves; 
that after work, recreation and rest were needed ; that there was wisdom in the 
heathen saying of "Carpe diem." All needed to seize on the day, which this meant, 
and there should be vacation time for rector, faculty, and students. Have a good 
time, as it is important to enjoy the blessings that God gives, for we can not 
vigorously enjoy the function of living without happiness. 

He enjoined that there be service done also; that there should not be selfish rest, 
but thought for others. If pleasure for self alone is sought, the source will run 
dry. Do not let vacation be for selfish personal indulgence and gratification. All 
should find something to do, whether in exercise or in sport; but there should be 
some high moral purpose in view. Be of service and make others happy, was his 
advice. Grow and develop in character. He asked the blessing of God on all, and 
expressed the hope that all the students, bringing others with them, would be at 
St. Mary's in the coming year. 

Then came the prayers and benediction, and the exercises closed with the re- 
cessional hymn, "Jerusalem, High Tower." 

THE COMMENCEMENT MARSHALS. 

The Commencement marshals performed their duties admirably. They were: 
Chief Marshal, Miss Elizabeth Leary of Edenton; assistants, Misses Janie Sims of 
Maxwelton, Va. ; Byrd Henderson of Asheville, Amelia Sturgeon of Gary, Nellie 
Hendricks of Marshall, Rebecca Wood of Edenton, and Patsey Smith of Raleigh. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



The Salutatory of 1911. 



JOSEPHINE PEARL TOXXOFFSKI. 



Perhaps there is no one thing in life which brings to all of us at 
times a feeling of more numbing pain than the thought of days that are 
no more and can be no more, so inexorable is the law that the moving 
finger of time can not turn backward. 

And yet, even though today there is in the hearts of many of us here 
the saddening thought, there is, too, in our minds the thought that brings 
to us a feeling of satisfaction such as comes to every worker when 
one's task has been done. 

We, the Class of 1911, feel that no matter how much we have left 
undone, no matter how much there remains for us to do, we have been 
graduated in the sense that we have gone forward one step, have ac- 
complished one stage. 

And, therefore, it is with pleasure that we welcome here today all our 
friends to share with us our happiness in our Commencement Day. 
"With respect and good will we greet the visitors, our speaker, the Bishops 
and Trustees. 

We are happy in meeting together again in the presence of our 
esteemed Rector, our beloved and faithful Lady Principal, and the 
other members of the Faculty who have been our guides. Finally, we 
welcome to this gathering our schoolmates of many happy hours. 



The Class Essay. 



NELL BATTLE LEWIS. 



The Poetry of Kipling. 

Kipling's well-deserved fame as a man of letters depends upon his 
prominence as an author of both prose and poetry. We must, however, 
leave the consideration of his charm as a teller of tales as "another 
story," and consider him as a singer, as Rudyard Kipling, the Modern 
Poet. In Kipling "the banjo has found its xlpollo." Although he 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 

has unquestionably written good poetry in other veins, nevertheless, he 
is essentially a poet of dialect, a master of captivating sing-song melody, 
a magician of catches and refrains. His verse is vigorous, virile, breezy, 
buoyant, free. Kipling touches the heart of things, but his method is 
brusque; he expresses the joy and sadness that come into the lives of 
common men, and he laughs, a little bitterly sometimes, at their short- 
comings. There is, however, in his poetry, a higher note, a note of the 
"divine unrest," which is, perhaps, an inseparable attribute of the 
poetic soul, a note of aspiration and of unfulfilled desire which is best 
seen in his magnificent hymn, "To the True Romance." Kipling is 
unquestionably recognized as the foremost Englishman in the world of 
letters today. 

The forenote of his real poetry is sounded in the "Departmental 
Ditties," the first volume of his works ever published. Viewed from a 
serious or literary standpoint, these have comparatively little value. 
We find little of the "divine fire" in such verses as the following, which 
are typical of these early poems : 

Potiphar Gubbins, C.E., 
Stands at the top of the tree; 
And I muse in my bed on the reasons that led 
To the hoisting of Potiphar C. 

Lovely Mehitabel Lee, 
Let me inquire of thee, 
Should I have riz to where Potiphar is, 
Hadst thou been mated to me? 

Though the "Departmental Ditties" are hardly more than amusing 
doggerel, clever burlesque, we find in them hints of better things to 
come : the delicious humor, the compelling rhythm, the clever satire of 
Kipling's later verse. 

For satire in verse, Kipling has a marked gift ; and this satire is 
one of the most pronounced characteristics of his poetry. It develops 
from the good natured laugh of the "Departmental Ditties" through 
the spirited indignation of "Tommy," the satirical sneer of "The Co- 
nundrum of the Workshops," the withering scorn of "Tomlinson," to 
the hopeless bitterness of the "Vampire." The satire in "Tommy" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 

though striking has little bitterness. We have to smile at the violent 
expression of Tommy Atkins' righteous wrath: 

For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' chuck him out, the brute; 
But it's saviour of 'is country when the guns begin to shoot ; 
And it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' anything you please; 
An' Tommy ain't a blooming fool — you bet that Tommy sees. 

And we are still smiling as we read '"'The Conundrum of the Work- 
shops," that piquant, clever composition, in which Kipling sneers at the 
foolish prattle about the so-called "Art with a capital A" ; and as we 
read "Tomlinson," in which the poet, by the force of his powerful 
satire, holds up to ridicule a type never before in literature so clearly 
defined — the type of man utterly devoid of individuality, who never did 
good enough to take him to heaven, or evil enough to gain him admit- 
tance to hell. 

"Oh, this I have read in a book," he said, "and that was told to me, 
And this I have thought that another man thought of a Prince in Muscovy." 

It is in the "'Vampire" that this powerful gift of satire attains its 
most forceful expression ; when all the contempt, and all the scorn, and 
all the bitterness is poured forth in one violent outburst which rises 
from the cold contempt of the opening lines to the hysterical sob with 
which the poem ends. Not only is this poem his most powerful achieve- 
ment in satire, but it is one of the bitterest things ever written by man 
against woman. Blended with the bitterness and cynicism, there is a 
touch of hysteria in the poem, there is the cry of a hurt heart, a pas- 
sionate sob of wild regret. And it is this that makes the poem as bitter 
and as powerful as it is. It is the touch of personal pain that accentu- 
ates the murderous force. 

Oh, the toil we lost, and the spoil we lost, 

And the excellent things we planned, 
Belong to the woman who didn't know why, 
And now we know that she never knew why 

And did not understand. 

But it isn't the shame, and it isn't the blame, 

That stings like a white-hot brand; 
It's coming to know that she never knew why, 
(Seeing at last she could never know why), 

And could never understand. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Kipling's views of women are somewhat bitter ; he has no patience 
with her superficiality, but the most profound sympathy with her depth 
of love and passion ; as is shown in "The Dirge of Dead Sisters" and 
in "Mary, Pity Women." This last is the most pathetic poem Kip- 
ling ever wrote. It is the passionate outpouring of a soul, torn 
asunder. Woman, stripped of all frivolity, with only the nobility of 
her unswerving faithfulness, never cried out to just heaven with more 
tragic appeal than this hopeless creature who voices the bitterness of a 

breaking heart : 

So help me, Christ, it's true! 

Where can I hide or go? 
You coward through and through — 

Ah, Gawd ! I love you so. 

For pure pathos, Kipling has never surpassed this poem. 

There are, however, in his works more evidence of humor than of 
pathos ; and this humor is the hearty laughter of the British soldier who 
"has taken his fun as he found it," Though he laughs, it is usually 
the laugh that derides ; he can seldom resist pointing a finger good 
naturedly at some vulnerable point which transfigured by his wit becomes 
an absurdity. It is humor irresistible, like infectious laughter. If 
we judge Kipling by the "Barrack Room Ballads" alone, which show 
better than any of his other works the true spirit of his poetry, we 
might even go so far as to call him a humorous poet. 

It is in this volume of poems, the "Barrack Room Ballads," that 
Kipling is at his best. Though not successful with the ballad written 
in simple English, nevertheless there is one kind of ballad of which he 
is clearly a master, the swinging ballad, written in dialect, with the 
jingly chorus and catchy refrain, the ballad that sings itself, by its pure 
literary effect, into the memory. There are comparatively few of the 
"Barrack Room Ballads" which are of the first order ; but these are, of 
their kind, perfect creations, and by the magic of the poet's genius they 
are created from the commonest material, from the very refuse of 
language. LeGalliene says : "Never is the miracle of art more fully 
brought home to us than when such coarse material is touched to finer 
tissue." Where in poetry do we find anything that surpasses the de- 
licious humor, the biting irony, the irresistible swing of "Fuzzy Wuzzy" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 

and ''Tommy," the tragic shiver and mournful music of "Danny 

Deever/' the romance and melody and passion of "Mandalay" I And 

we seldom find more tender love poetry than in the last. 

Besides these poems are others to be considered. "The Ballad of the 

Bolivar" nearest approaches the height of excellence attained by the 

"Barrack Room Ballads." It is like them in its slang and in its 

rhythm. This is easily the first of the sea ballads, and is distinguished 

by its imaginative vitality, its brutal vigor, and its forceful metaphor. 

And who can resist the breezy charm and the delightful frankness of 

the "Ladies" ? 

Now, I aren't no 'and with the ladies; 

For taking them all along, 
You never can say till you've tried 'em, 

And then you are like to be wrong. 
There's times when you think that you mightn't, 

There's times when you know that you might, 
But the things you will learn from the Yellow and Brown 

They'll help you a lot with the White. 

The "Recessional" and the "White Man's Burden" are spirited 
hymns, and have been powerful political forces. There is a certain sub- 
limity in the "Recessional," a wonderful dignity of movement. 

God of our fathers, known of old, 

Lord of our far-flung battle line, 
Beneath whose awful hand we hold 

Dominion over palm and pine — 
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, 

Lest we forget, lest we forget. 

The tumult and the shouting dies, 

The captains and the kings depart ; 
Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice, 

An humble and a contrite heart. 
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, 

Lest we forget, lest we forget. 

To Kipling's most magnificent hymn, "To the True Romance," I have 
already alluded as of all his poems the one best expressing the aspira- 
tion of the poet-soul. In this as in the "Dedication to the Barrack 
Room Ballads," "When Earth's Last Picture is Painted," "Tomlin- 
son," "The Last Chantey," etc., Kipling's imaginative powers are shown. 
Kipling's is a vigorous imagination. It is not the flowery meandering 



22 The St. Maky's Muse. 

of the idle thoughts of a long-haired poet who sits by the murmuring 

brook and writes tender verses to the birds and the flowers ; it is the 

high thought of a strong man in a busy age who finds in the throbbing 

heart of the great machine the same unchanging romance "Which was 

as yet the Lights were set a Whisper in the Void." He does not catch 

the vista through 

Charmed magic casements 

Opening on the foam of perilous seas 

In fairy lands forlorn. -> 

His imagination is one of strength and freedom rather than of beauty, 
but there is a distinctive beauty in this freedom and strength. The 
magnificent sweep of this unique imagination carries him a beyond the 
loom of the last lone star," "farther than ever comet dared, or vagrant 
star dust swirled." Borne on the flights of this wonderful breath he 
sweeps to the outposts Azrael, he circles the "Belt of Naughty Stars 
that rim the mouth of Hell," "he hangs with the reckless seraphim on 
the reins of a red-maned star." 

Kipling's conception of the Deity is unique. He is a god of toil, 
"The Master of Every Trade." 

And tells them of his daily toil 
And of Edens newly made. 

He is a god of sincerity, "The god of things as they are." He is a god 
of battles. 

And to buffet a path through the Pit's red wrath 
When God goes out to War. 

It is this very fact that Kipling seeks to present the heavenly powers 
in terms that sometimes fail utterly in dignity that is one of the chief 
defects of his poetry. Perhaps also at times he expresses too much 
brutality in his verse, and he is occasionally guilty of poetry dull, bad 
and commonplace. 

In spite of this element in his poetry he touches the heart, but with 
the swinging, jingly song of the banjo, that music that is music's 
dialect. "But in the high calm zones of Poetry where a word lasts for 
a thousand years ; where the poet's voice is so strong and clear that it 
needs no modern devices to make it carry; where the languages of 
Babylon and Persia and Egypt and Pome and Greece and Italy and 






The St. Mary's Muse. 23 

England are but the dialects of one eternal speech ; where Homer sings 

immortality of war; where Shakespeare sounds the depths and heights 

of all philosophies ; where Keats knows all beauty, Kipling, the most 

famous modern man of letters, has no acknowledged place." But, like 

all the singers who through the ages have stirred the hearts of men, he 

is groping in his verse for what he himself calls the shifting light of 

the True Romance, 

Which is in sooth the lovely truth 
The careless angels know. 



The 1911 Valedictory. 



MARY REBECCA MERRITT. 



As we come to this day toward which we have worked so long and 
for which we have yearned so earnestly, we know that we come with a 
feeling not altogether bright and happy, for we realize that we must 
part from the old friends and the old life that has meant so much to us 
and enter the new, the untried. At this time if there is one thing that 
I would like to lay upon the hearts of my fellow-students, it is the 
thought given us by the Bishop of Georgia that we should have high 
ideals toward which we are ever working and which make life so much 
more effective. Just those standards of gaining from life all of good 
it holds, the standards that have been held up before us at St. Mary's 
will prove most beneficial to us. Life is large and we can not hope to 
grasp the whole of it, but we may be prepared for those things that will 
go to make up happy lives of service, for we may indeed be ever doing 
something towards making our lives fuller and more abundant. It is 
with a feeling of love and reverence for dear old St. Mary's and regret 
at passing from under her kindly care and protection that we now say 
farewell to our Alma Mater. To our fellow-students who have always 
treated us with consideration and with kindness, to the members of the 
Faculty who have been so sympathetic and untiring in their labors for 
us, to our dear Lady Principal who has ever been so kind and thought- 
ful for the welfare of all of us, and to our beloved Rector who has ever 
had our best interests at heart — to one and all we say, God speed, and 
God be with you throughout each future day. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Pre-commencement News. 



The Concert of Chamber Music. 

On Thursday night a large and appreciative audience were delighted 
with a concert of chamber music, given by Misses Marjory Sherwin, first 
violin ; Miss Louise Paulsen (of Peace), second violin, and Miss Bertha 
M. Luney, piano, the program of which follows : 

1. Overture to the Marriage of Figaro Mozart 

2. Concerto in A major, Op. 34 Alard 

Allegro Maestoso 

Larghetto 

Finale — Allegretto 

3. Duo Concertanto, Op. 57, No. 3 d'Beriot 

Adagio cantabile sostenuto 
Allegretto 

(For two violins) 

4. Spanish Danee, Op. 33 Sarasate 

[From the News and Observer.] 
Recital at St. Mary's, Monday. May 15th. 

The piano recital given last evening by Miss Julia Borden and Miss Amelia 
Sturgeon in the Auditorium of St. Mary's School was greatly enjoyed by an appre- 
ciative audience. The program was an attractive one, and was well rendered 
throughout. 

Both players, though so different in style, showed talent and good training. 
Miss Borden plays with spirit and taste; Miss Sturgeon with dignity and delicacy, 
giving evidence occasionally of reserve powers as yet undeveloped. 

The opening number, Tours' "Suite," and the closing, Pirami's "Gavotte," for 
two pianos, were especially well received by the audience. 

"The Lass With the Delicate Air" was beautifully sung by Miss Shull, Miss 
Thomas, Miss Dortch and Miss Gilbert. 

The selections rendered were: 

1. "Minuet," "Romance," "Tarantelle" — from "Suite" Tours 

Miss Borden and Miss Sturgeon. 

2. Sonata, Op. 10, No. 1 Beethoven 

Allegro. 

Miss Borden. 

3. "Elevation" Florsheim 

Miss Sturgeon. 

4. "The Lass With the Delicate Air" Arne-Shelley 

Miss Zona Shull, Miss Marie Thomas, Miss Lucy Dortch, 
Miss Frederika Gilbert. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 

5. (a) Romance Rubinstein 

{ b ) Ballet in G Chaminade 

( c ) Mazurka Godard 

Miss Bordex. 

6. (a) On Wings of Song Liszt-Mendelssohn 

( b ) Norwegian Dance, Op. 35, No. 2 Grieg 

( c) II Busignuolo ( "In My Neighbor's Garden" ) Nevin 

Miss Sturgeox. 

7. Gavotte, for two pianos Pirami 

Miss Sturgeox and Miss Bordex. 

The Song Recital, Saturday, May 21st. 

In the Auditorium of St. Mary's School last evening, Saturday, May 21st, Miss 
Zona Shull and Mr. Henry Grady Miller, pupils of Mr. R. Blinn Owen, gave a pro- 
gram of merit and artistic beauty. 

Miss Shull's voice is a lyric soprano of pure quality and delicate vocal tints. 
Her tonal emission, her control of tone and her vocal intelligence, deserve high 
praise. Her voice showed best in the aria "Caro nome" ; in "L'Oiselet" of Chopin, 
and in the last group number, "Lute Song," by Blinn Owen. 

"Irish Folk Song," Arthur Foote. 

"Nightingale," by Luders. 

Mr. Miller's voice is a baritone rich and velvety in tone, but virile and resonant, 
and shows excellent training. He was at his best in the Schumann numbers ; in the 
"Pine Tree," by Grant; the "First Primrose," by Grieg, and in the charming little 
song, "Difficulty," by Winter Watts. 

The program closed with the beautiful "Duette" from Don Giovanni, in which 
the fresh, pure tones of the young voices blended with great charm. The full 
program was: 

"La Violette" Scarlatti. 1659 

"Ah ! lo so" Aria — Magic Flute Mozart 

"Pipes of Pan" Edward Elgar 

"Auf dem Wasser zu singen" Schubert 

"Vendulka's Cradle Song" — Hubricka Smetatm 

"Im Walde" — "Hansel und Gretel" Humperdinck 

Wanderlied Schumann 

Der Nussbaum Schumann 

"Caro nome" Rigoletto Verdi 

Pine Tree Grant 

First Primrose Grieg 

"L'Oiselet" Chopin 

"Chanson Provencale" Del' Acqua 

"There Was a Lad" Old Scotch 

Difficulty Winter Watts 

Lute Song Blinn Owen 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Irish Folk Song Arthur Foote 

Nightingale Gustave Luders 

Duette — "Give Me Thy Hand, Fairest" — Don Giovanni Mozart 

During the week preceding Commencement the Seniors were the 
especial guests at two afternoon entertainments. The first one was a 
five-o'clock tea given by Mr. and Mrs. Stone, where in addition to the 
Seniors and their honorary member, Mr. Cruikshank, there were invited 
Tinsley Harrison, Mary Owen, Ruth Critz, Julia Borden, Hortense 
Jones and Katherine Parker. 

On Saturday Miss Dowd entertained the Seniors, Mr. Cruikshank, 
the editors of the Annual Muse, and Byrd Henderson, Amelia Sturgeon 
and Elizabeth Leary at her home from 4 to 5. After a guessing con- 
test a ty (tea) party (a divini-ty presiding), and refreshments, the 
guests were driven to the Country Club in automobiles. This year's 
number of the Annual Muse was dedicated to Miss Dowd, a well- 
deserved recognition of one in whom all St. Mary's girls, past and 
present, take justifiable pride. 



The Faculty for 1911-1912. 



With the close of the session, when the excitement of Commencement 
week is over, and the last farewell has been said, at once the minds of 
those who are to remain active members of the School another year turn 
to thoughts of the session that is to come. "The year is dead, long 
live the year," is the sentiment. And as the personnel of the teaching 
force which is to be on duty in any session is a matter of prime interest 
to all concerned in the welfare of the School, almost the first point that 
arises in thinking of the new session centers around the new teachers. 

In the nature of things there must be a going and coining each year 
in the teaching force, as well as in the student body. And yet it is 
always with a feeling of regret that we see those whom we have known 
so well go to other fields, even while we learn with interest of those who 
are to take their places, and look forward to their coming, prepared to 
extend to each a warm welcome. 

There are more than the usual number of changes for the coming 
session, and we hate to part with each of those who leave ; but those 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 

whom we know best and have come to rely upon most will again almost 
without exception be in their places again in the fall. And among the 
new-comers are several who come to us almost as old friends, and whom 
we feel that we should know and believe in even before we come in close 
personal touch with them. 

It is with special regret that we give up Miss Buxton, who though 
able to be with us only one short year, took such a helpful part in our 
lives the past session, and won our affection as well as our admiration 
both in, and out, of the class room. Somehow we felt that this was due 
not only to her personality, but to the fact that she was an old St. Mary's 
girl, who after further training and experience elsewhere had come 
back to us with the old St. Mary's spirit, of which we have heard so 
much, strengthened and broadened. And so it is with special pleasure 
that we note among the new teachers Miss Skinner, and Miss deRosset, 
both of whom are also old St. Mary's girls, who have done their Alma 
Mater credit both as students and teachers since they left her. 

In Miss Wilson and Miss Ricks we feel a warmer interest because 
they received their undergraduate education in two of the sister schools 
for which we feel the greatest respect, Miss Wilson being a graduate of 
Winthrop, and Miss Ricks of Converse. Both have taught successfully 
since their graduation, and our interest in Miss Wilson is further in- 
creased by her being a "co-ed" graduate of Chapel Hill. 

Even more interesting to the new girls than the changes in the per- 
sons of the teachers is the fact that we are to have again a Domestic 
Science department, with an experienced Domestic Science teacher. 
We have heard that this course proved very popular and very successful 
under Miss Batdorff's charge in 1908, and have missed it in our day. 
Instead of a housekeeper and matron with entirely distinct duties, the 
whole housekeeping department is to be in charge of a supervising 
houskeeper, who will also have charge of the Domestic Science, with an 
assistant housekeeper in Clement Hall. 

We now wish to introduce briefly to St. Mary's girls, and the readers 
of The Muse, the new members of the faculty. 

In the College the changes are in the departments of Mathematics, 
French, and English. 



28 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Miss VanDyne is succeeded in charge of the Mathematics bj Miss 
Margaret Ricks, whose home town is Tarboro, 1ST. C, and who is a 
member of Calvary Parish there. Miss Ricks was educated first at 
Converse College, where she graduated in 1907. After her graduation 
she taught for three years in the public schools of North Carolina, the 
latter two years teaching Mathematics and History in the County High 
School at Whiteville. The past year she has been a graduate student 
in Mathematics at Georgetown College, Kentucky, where she has been 
teaching Mathematics in the Preparatory department. She has just 
received her Master's degree from Georgetown, and expects to continue 
her studies this summer at the University of Chicago. 

Miss Macauley is succeeded in French by Miss Elizabeth Skinner of 
Raleigh. Miss Skinner was educated first at the Raleigh High School, 
and from there came to St. Mary's where she made an exceptional rec- 
ord, and graduated at the front of the well-remembered class of 1904. 
She and her friend, Miss Eliza Brown, who was valedictorian of the 
class of 1904, and later a teacher here before her marriage, were two 
of the best French pupils St. Mary's has ever had. After graduation 
Miss Skinner began teaching in the Raleigh city schools, and when her 
former teacher, Miss Pool, came from the High School to St. Mary's, 
she was chosen to succeed her in charge of the French at the High 
School, and handled the department very successfully. The past year 
she has not been teaching. Miss Skinner will continue her studies 
this summer at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York. 

Miss Buxton's place in English will be taken by Miss Louise Wilson 
of Waynesville. Miss Wilson was educated at Winthrop College, South 
Carolina, graduating in 1905. She then taught for five years in the 
Episcopal Mission school near Waynesville, and last year entered the 
University of North Carolina, from which institution she has just 
graduated with credit. She did especially good work in English at 
Chapel Hill with Professor Minis and Dean Graham. Miss Wilson, 
like Miss Buxton, will assist Miss Thomas here in English. 

Miss Mary Sully Hayward, a graduate of Hollins College in 1909 
and recently teaching at Powhatan Institute, Belona, Va., comes to us 
very highly recommended and will have charge of the work in the 



The St. Ma ry's Muse. 29 

Preparatory department, where Miss Hill will continue her work as 
assistant. 

In the Music Department, the new-comers are Miss Crafts and Miss 
deRosset. Miss Dowd will continue to direct the department, and Mr. 
Owen will continue to be in charge of Voice. 

Miss Sherwin's successor is Miss Blanche L. Crafts, who will have 
charge of the work in Violin, and assist Mr. Owen in Voice. Miss 
Crafts, who grew up in the west, entered the Xew England Conserva- 
tory in 1898, and was graduated from that institution in 1905. She 
graduated with the highest honor, and then became a member of the 
faculty, at the same time holding the position of most honor that a 
woman violinist can hold in Boston, that of Concert-mistress of the 
large symphonic orchestra of the Conservatory. For two years she 
taught at the Conservatory, and during that time also assisted Felix 
Winternitz, her teacher, in his private teaching outside of the Con- 
servatory, and studied with him privately. She studied special en- 
semble work for over three vears with Josef Adamowski. of the famous 
Adamowski Trio, and during that time did all of his advanced violin 
work. She has taught ensemble playing with great success in connec- 
tion with her other work, and also Musical Theory and History. She 
studied Voice at the Xew England Conservatory, has taught voice 
successfully, and has had many years experience in church choirs and 
solo work about Boston. Miss Crafts taught for two years in the 
Academy of the Assumption at Wellesley, Mass., and for three years in 
the south, part of the time at Weslesay College, Georgia, and for the 
past year she has been teaching at Acadia Seminary, Wolfville, Canada. 

Miss Caroline deRosset of Wilmington, who succeeds Miss Battle as 
teacher of Piano, came to St. Mary's from the Wilmington schools in 

1905, made a good record and received the Certificate in Piano in 

1906. She then went to Baltimore to continue her studies at the Pea- 
bodv Conservatory, and has been connected with that institution since. 
She was a piano pupil of Emmanuel Wad, and graduated from the 
Peabody with the Teacher's Certificate in the spring of 1910. The past 
year she has been teaching in the preparatory department of the Con- 
servatory. Miss deRosset is highly spoken of by the authorities of the 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Conservatory, both as pupil and teacher, and is welcomed back to St. 
Mary's with much pleasure. 

Miss Tenner continues at the head of the Art Department, and 
Miss Lee of the Business Department, while Miss Victor's place in 
charge of the Elocution Department is taken by Miss Florence C. Davis 
of Elmira, New York. 

Miss Davis is a graduate of Emerson, class of 1906. She received 
her early education at Elmira College, New York, going from there to 
Boston. While at Emerson she also studied at the Posse Gymnasium. 
After her graduation she had a private studio in Elmira, teaching 
Elocution, and coaching plays for literary clubs ; was later substitute 
teacher of Elocution and Physical Culture in Miss Metcalf's school at 
Tarrytown, New York ; and for the past two years has been teaching 
Elocution and Physical Culture at Reidsville Seminary, Reidsville, 
N. C. 

The Domestic work of the School, which has been under the charge 
of Mrs. Gretter and Miss Hardesty, has been rearranged, and is to be 
in charge of a Supervising Housekeeper, and an Assistant House- 
keeper. The only position not yet filled is that of Assistant House- 
keeper. Miss Sarah Marguerite Lane has been secured as Super- 
vising Housekeeper and teacher of Domestic Science. She has taken 
courses in Domestic Science at the Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New 
York, and in Middlebury, Vermont, and we are fortunate in being 
able to add this feature to our school curriculum. She has been assist- 
ant steward at Vassar College for two years, and will therefore bring 
most valuable experience to her work in charge of the whole housekeep- 
ing department. 

The Muse extends for the School a warm greeting to all the incom- 
ing teachers and officers. 



Notes of the Teachers. 



The teachers have scattered almost as widely as the girls for their 
summer vacation. 

The Rector expects to be at the School most of the summer. He 
goes to New York on the 15th and officiates on the 17th at the marriage 



The St. Mart's Muse. 31 

of Mr. Cruikshank and Miss Jones at St. Paul's Chapel, Columbia 
University. He expects to take Elizabeth and Ellen north with him 
and leave them for a stay with some of their relatives at St. Paul's 
School. After attending to some business in JSTew York, and seeing 
some of his friends, he will be back at St. Mary's about July 1st. 

Miss Thomas expects to spend most of her summer in South Caro- 
lina. Her father is still very ill in Columbia, and she will probably 
be most of the time with relatives there. She spent the week after 
school closed with her brother, the Eev. A. S. Thomas, and his wife 
(Emily Carrison '07) in Cheraw, and was almost as much a favorite 
with her little nephew there as she is with the girls of St. Mary's. 

Mr. Cruikshank was kept very busy at the School until the 11th, 
when he left for a two-months vacation. As already mentioned, his 
marriage to Miss Margaret Jones, who is too well known to St. Mary's 
folk to require mention here, takes place on the 17th in Xew York. 
They sail on the 20th for Europe, expecting to spend six weeks in 
Germany, and to be at home at the School about the 25th of August. 

During the vacation Miss Sutton will be on duty at St. Mary's, and 
Mr. Stone will be back and forth, being present here when not on one 
of his trips for the School. Mrs. Stone and Florence will spend most 
of the summer with Mrs. Stone's mother, Mrs. Judge Dick in Greens- 
boro. 

Miss Fenner, after a brief visit at her home in Baltimore, sailed on 
the 11th for her annual European trip. With her went Miss Hardesty 
and Meta Mewborn, They expect to return about September 1st. 

Miss Dowd is at her home in West Raleigh, and Miss Lee at her 
home on Boylan Avenue in Raleigh. Miss Lee's mother became desper- 
ately ill shortly after school closed, and grew gradually weaker until 
the end came on June 11th. The sympathy of all St. Mary's girls will 
go out to Miss Lee, who has so lovingly given of her own strength and 
care to her mother that she is far from well herself. 

Miss Katie went from school to visit her sister, Mrs. Hawlev, in 
Fayetteville, and later expects to visit various friends. 

Miss Luney remained at the School through the Church Conference, 
June 5th to 10th, and was organist for the Conference. She will after- 
wards visit Mary Gaither in Hertford, and expects to visit several 



32 The St. Mary's Muse. 

other Carolina friends and later spend some time at her farm in New 
York State. 

Mr. Owen was in Raleigh until the 15th of June, when he left to 
conduct the annual Music Festival at Bluefield, West Virginia, which 
he conducted so successfully, last year. From there he goes to Round 
Lake, New York, where he will study this summer with Mr. Cornell, 
and also do some teaching and accompanying. 

Mrs. Gretter finished up her work on the first of June and left on the 
5th to take up her new work at the McAdoo Hotel, Greensboro. 

The shocking news reached us on Thursday, June 8th, of the murder 
at the hands of a burglar of Mrs. Joel Hill, widow of Dr. Joel Hill, and 
mother of our former pupil and present teacher, Louise Hill. Mrs. 
Hill, after some months visit at a sanatorium in Philadelphia, was on 
a visit to her mother at Jamestown, N. C, on her way to her home at 
Lexington, N. C. The deepest sympathy of all of our readers will go 
out to Miss Louise and her sisters in their hour of deep affliction. 



Commencement Visitors. 



Mrs. Frank Wood, Edenton ; Mrs. Collins, Hillsboro ; Mrs. Perry, 
Henderson ; Mrs. R. M. McArthur, Winston-Salem ; Mrs. R. H. North- 
rop, Wilmington ; Mrs. Jones, Raleigh ; Miss Nan Cuthbert, Peters- 
burg, Va. ; Miss Lilner Beale, Franklin, Va. ; Miss Kate Northrop, 
Wilmington ; Miss Lucy Mann, Middleton ; Mrs. R. R. Mobley, Reids- 
ville ; Mrs. H. W. Jackson, Richmond. 



Notes of the Girls. 



Elise Lloyd returned to Raleigh Tuesday afternoon, May 30th, to 
attend the A. & M. dances. 

Meta Mewborn will spend the summer abroad under the chaperonage 
of Miss Clara Fenner. 

Marie Thomas and Helen McArthur remained in Raleigh until the 
Tuesday after Commencement, when they left to attend the Chapel 
Hill dances. 



The St. Maet's Muse. 33 

Hortense Jones, after attending the Chapel Hill dances, will visit the 
Erwin girls. 

Patsey Smith and Anna Strong accompanied Evelyn Maxwell to her 
home in Jacksonville for a visit shortly after Commencement. 

Amy Winston was hostess at a house party beginning June 13th, with 
the following St. Mary's girls as guests : Sarah Wilson, Mary Louise 
Manning, Mary Bell and Catharine Small. 

Amelia Sturgeon visited Mrs. Julius Duncan in Durham immediately 
after Commencement. 

Among other St. Mary's girls at house parties in Durham (Mary 
Louise Manning and the Erwin girls) were Hortense Jones, Byrd 
Henderson and Julia Borden. 



The St. Mary's Conference. 



The Muse readers will probably recall the fact that in 1910, the 
experiment was tried of bringing together, shortly after the close of the 
spring session, as guests of St. Mary's, the clergy of the Carolinas and 
laymen from each parish, to hear addresses and talks by well-known 
speakers and to confer together on matters of general interest to them 
in their religious and church life. The experiment proved successful, 
and this year the invitation was repeated to attend the second confer- 
ence, lasting from June 5th to June 10th. 

The attendance was larger this year than in 1910, and if Churchmen 
in the two States could once take part in the sweet chapel services, be- 
ginning daily with a celebration of the Holy Communion at half past 
seven, listen to the inspiring addresses and enjoy the social gatherings on 
the spacious porch or on the oak-shaded lawn, at future conferences it 
would tax the capacity of the School to entertain them all. In all there 
were present during the conference 35 clergymen and 18 laymen. 

On each morning after morning prayer there was an address by Rev. 
F. J. Mallett, Ph.D., of Salisbury, N. C, on Present Day Problems 
Confronting the Church. This was followed at 10 :30 by an address 
on the Sunday School by Rev. L. 1ST. Caley, rector of the Church of St. 
Jude and the Nativity, Philadelphia, Pa., and at 12 o'clock Mr. Eugene 



34 The St. Mary's Muse. 

M. Camp of New York, President of the Seabury Society, gave ad- 
dresses on various subjects connected with the missionary and social 
service work of the Church. All of these addresses were full of help 
and inspiration, and in the case of Mr. Caley, in particular, the subject, 
the Sunday School in all its different relations, was treated in such a 
masterly manner that every one had certain definite ideas to carry home 
with him to help him in his work. 

The afternoons were devoted to conferences, to visiting, and to a visit 
in a body to St. Augustine's and St. Agnes' Hospital on Wednesday 
afternoon. 

The meetings at night were held in the Auditorium and consisted on 
Tuesday and Thursday nights of lectures on the American Church by 
the Rev. Mr. Caley, illustrated by stereopticon views ; on Wednesday 
night by Rev. W. L. Claiborne of Sewanee, Tenn., on Christian Educa- 
tion, and on Friday night a talk, also illustrated by stereopticon views, 
by the Rev. C. P. Willcox of Mayodan, N. C, on Work Among Mill 
People. The final service took place in the Chapel at 10 o'clock Friday 
night. 

The general impression resulting from the Conference, expressed by 
many present, is that it has been immensely helpful in religious in- 
spiration and in the opportunity to consult together, without the hurry 
and wear and tear of so many gatherings, about matters of great im- 
portance in Christian living and opportunities for service. 



Alumnae Weddings and Others. 



Mr. Robert J. Victor 

of Arlington, New Jersey 

announces the marriage of his daughter 

Muriel Marian 

to 

Dr. Frank D. Castlebury 

Thursday, May twenty-fifth 

Nineteen hundred and eleven 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



The St. Mary's Muse. 35 

Miss Victor has been the teacher of elocution at St. Mary's this past 
year. The groom is a rising young dentist in Raleigh. The young 
couple have the hearty good wishes of The Muse. 



Mrs. Henry Austin Crenshaw 

requests the honor of 

your presence at the marriage of her daughter 

Helen Shaw 

to 

Mr. Robert Linn Bernhardt 

on the evening of Wednesday the seventh of June 

at nine o'clock 

at Saint Paul's Church 

Louisburg, Xorth Carolina 

Miss Crenshaw was a pupil at St. Mary's in 1902-3, as were her 
mother and grandmother. Mr. and Mrs. Bernhardt have our best 
wishes. 



Mrs. N". C. Horsley 

requests the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of her daughter 

Mabel 

to 

Mr. Frank Hiding Poston 

Wednesday evening, June the twenty-eighth 

nineteen hundred and eleven 

at six o'clock 

St. Matthew's Episcopal Church 

Sparrows Point, Md. 

Miss Horsley has been a member of the faculty of St. Mary's for the 
past four years. It will seem a distinct loss to the girls to hear of no 
more special deliveries, with which the girls of the last four years have 
been so familiar. The Muse takes this opportunity to send its best 
greetings. 

Saint Mary's School Library 



36 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Mr. and Mrs. Cadwallader Jones 

announce the marriage 

of their sister 

Margaret Mordecai Jones 

to 

Mr. Ernest Cruikshank 

Saturday, June seventeenth 

nineteen hundred and eleven 

St. Paul's Chapel, Columbia University 

New York City 

Probably no event of recent years has been of more widespread in- 
terest to St. Mary's faculty and to the younger St. Mary's alumnae than 
the above announcement of the marriage of Mr. Cruikshank and Miss 
Jones. In the fall of 1903 Mr. Ernest Cruikshank, a young A.M. 
from Washington College, Maryland, and graduate student of the Johns 
Hopkins University, came to St. Mary's to teach Latin and Science. 
The following year he was made the School Secretary, and a little later 
General Business Manager, which position he still holds. With in- 
creasing cares and responsibilities he found time to revive the all but 
dying monthly Muse, of which he became Faculty Editor and secret 
source of strength, and St. Mary's alumnae owe him a debt of gratitude. 
During the eight years of his residence at St. Mary's he has little by 
little, actively identified himself with every interest of the School, and 
St. Mary's girls are not unmindful of the fact. The beautiful annual 
Muse of 1909 was dedicated to him and he was honorary member of the 
class of 1911. Margaret Jones was the valedictorian of the class of 
1896, and since then, when she was not doing the social act, or studying 
at the University of North Carolina, or at the Teachers College, 
Columbia University, New York City, she has been lighting the way 
and smoothing the path for St. Mary's girls on the rough road of mathe- 
matics. In the words of one of her grateful students, "You just have 
to learn with Miss Jones, she makes it so plain." Miss Jones has won 
more than the gratitude of her students ; she has won their admiration 
and affection by the nobility of her character and by the charm of her 
womanhood. Not the least interesting part of the wedding announce- 
ment is the accompanying card which says, "At home at St. Mary's 
School after September 1st." 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



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4®= Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 




CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 



Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones 



={ 



174 
226 



THE HOTEL RALEIGH 

INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

insurance against loss by fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 
THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 



SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 

YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T PULLEN, 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advebtisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson 

PRESIDENT 



F. H. Briggs 

CASHIER 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round steps bank" since 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly 6- Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

DR. F. D. CASTLEBURY 



AYCOCK & WINSTON 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW RALEIGH, N. C. 

JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

Dr. D. E. EVERETT 

DENTIST 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

222 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 

Garments at our store because we sell 

better goods for less money 

THE FASHION 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

Why Is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular ? 
ASK THE GIRLS 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROY ALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

C. E. HARTGE— ARCHITECT 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD— MILLINERY 

13 West Hargett St. Phone 632 

10% off to Faculty and Boarding Pupils 

SHOES 

12 East Martin Street 
PEEBLES & EDWARDS 



DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON 

DENTIST 

116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Books and Stationery 

113 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

GREEN & WATSON 

Art Store 

11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 

Phone 953-R 

217H Fayetteville Street 

N. H. MOORE 

Repairer of Fine Shoes 

Fayetteville Street 

MISS SMITH 

DRESSMAKER 

Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kind8 of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 
Rich Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing promptly done 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 



SALVATORE DESK), who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na 
ture. Manufacturing of new Jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



Calendar for 1911-1912. 



1911. 



September 18, Monday: Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 19, Tuesday: Registration and Classification of City Pupils; New Board- 
ing Pupils report by 7 p. m. 

September 20, Wednesday: Preliminary Examinations; Old Boarding Pupils report 
by 7 p. m. ; Registration and Classification of Boarding Pupils. 

September 21, Thursday: Opening Service of Advent Term (First Half-year) at 
9 a. m. 

November 1, Wednesday: All Saints; Founders' Day. 

November 23, Thursday: Second Quarter begins. 

November 30: Thanksgiving Day. 

December 15-January 3 : Christmas Recess. 



1912. 

January 3, Wednesday: All pupils report by 7 p. m. 

January 25, Thursday: Easter Term (Second Half-year) begins. 

February 21, Ash Wednesday: Lent begins. 

March 21, Thursday: Last Quarter begins. 

March 31, Palm Sunday: Annual Visit of the Bishop for Confirmation. 

April 5, Good Friday: Holy Day. 

May 12, Sunday: Alumnae Day; 70th Anniversary of the Founding of St. Mary's. 

May 16, Thursday: Ascension Day. 

May 26-May 28 : Commencement Season. 

September 19, Thursday: 71st Session begins. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. G. 

{for girls and young women) 

70th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 21, 1911. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1912. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: / j, THE ART SCHOOL 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1910-11 were enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Ilev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 






®ttof)iv, 1911 




ftaletgf), ^L C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

OPENING NUMBER. 
Vol. XVI. October, 1911. No. 2 

O God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this School 
with thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with the light of 
the everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; increase in us 
true religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great mercy keep us in 
the same, O blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the Son, together, we 
worship and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 

The Opening of the Seventieth Session 



With the simple service in the Chapel on Thursday morning, Sep- 
tember 21st, the seventieth session of St. Mary's became a fact. 

The weather was auspicious, teachers and girls were on hand ready 
for the work of the year, and without any special formalities the regular 
course of the school life was taken up. 

Following the custom instituted by the present Rector, both new and 
old girls arrived in sufficient time before the regular time of opening for 
the preliminaries of registration, examination and classification to be 
practically accomplished before the formal opening, and from the hour 
of the opening service the regular daily routine of the year is followed 
as closely as possible so as to eliminate as far as possible both waste of 
time and that greater terror, homesickness. St. Mary's begins to wake 
up from the summer calm on the Saturday before opening Thursday, 
for the new teachers arrive that day ; then Monday the old teachers come, 
and Monday evening the first teachers' meeting is held; and Tuesday 
all is in readiness for the welcome to the new girls who arrive with 
their parents in goodly numbers ; Wednesday is the day for the return 
of the old girls ; and Thursday morning at the 9 :00 o'clock Chapel 
service the Rector announces simply, "With this service the seventieth 
(or the seventy-first as the case may be) session of St. Mary's is for- 



38 The St. Maey's Muse. 

mally opened," and the regular course of the session begins, so that 
Friday morning classes are going on almost as usual. 

So it was this year. The procession formed at 9 :00 and the new 
girls marched for the first time into the Chapel to the familiar strains 
of "Holy, Holy, Holy." With the Rector, representing the Trustees 
and assisting Mr. Lay in the service, were Bishop Cheshire and Rev. 
M. A. Barber of Christ Church, Raleigh. Shortened Morning Prayer 
was said as it is said each week-day morning during the school session, 
and at its conclusion the Rector introduced Bishop Cheshire as Presi- 
dent of the Trustees and Bishop of the Diocese. Bishop Cheshire spoke 
briefly, and after welcoming all to St. Mary's, gave as the opening 
thought for the year the reminder to his congregation, the School, that 
true happiness, after which all should struggle, is accomplished only by 
the faithful performance of each duty as it comes. At the conclusion 
of his message and singing "The Church's One Foundation" as a reces- 
sional, the procession passed back to the School Room, out and on to 
other duties. 



With the Girls of 1911-1912 



The list of the St. Mary's girls of any year as published in the 
Muse each September is always a matter of much interest to the 
friends of St. Mary's, and it is especially gratifying this year to note 
more names in the list than, so far as the records show, have ever been 
at this period in the year before. So far as we know St. Mary's remains 
the largest educational institution of the Episcopal Church for girls and 
young women in the country, with about 150 girls present as boarders, 
and others expected. 

The girls as a rule are somewhat older than for several years past, 
and they are divided about as usual as regards home location and 
church membership. Approximately 24 per cent are non-Episcopa- 
lians. There are more girls from the States to the South than we have 
had for several years, and East Carolina is again well represented, 
while Asheville this year shows a falling off. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 39 

The Senior Class is again small, though it hopes that the lack is 
only in quantity. For the first time in years all the Seniors are resi- 
dent students, though Raleigh is well represented by Elizabeth Hughes, 
Patsy Smith and Anna Strong. The other members of the class are 
Margaret Broadfoot, of Fayetteville ; Lina Lockhart, of Wadesboro ; 
Fannie McMullan, of Elizabeth City, and Nellie Hendricks, of Marshall. 

Mary Owen, Margaret Erwin and Nellie Hendricks share the distinc- 
tion of being the "oldest girls," this being the fifth session for each of 
them, while Mary Owen still holds the distance record, with her annual 
trip from Guatemala. 

The distance record belongs either to Mary Owen, who came straight 
from Guatemala City, or to Margaret Bottum, whose home has been for 
the past four years in San Diego, Cal. ; but the latter now counts her- 
self a Carolinian again, since her family have moved to Asheville 
this fall. 

It is a pleasure to note the increase in the representation from Ala- 
bama, Georgia and Florida, and to feel that the new representatives 
will live up to the record that the St. Mary's girls from those States 
have made in the past. Virginia Wyndham is the first Huntsville girl 
St. Mary's has had for many a year ; but Atlanta, Macon, Augusta, Bir- 
mingham, and the other cities, have been sending just enough girls for 
us to wish for more. 

Frances Fitchett and Dorothy Hopkins have added two of their 
friends to the Eastern Shore of Virginia delegation, and Ruth Douglas, 
coming from the Eastern Shore of Maryland, recalls the girls we have 
had from that section in former days. 

In the Carolinas conditions continue about the same. Elizabeth City 
and Oxford have strengthened their representation. Charlotte and Wil- 
mington are still not as fully represented as we would wish. It is an 
especial pleasure to welcome two new Edenton girls who show every 
evidence of being able to live up to the Edenton reputation, and there 
has been no town better represented here in recent years. 

But better than calling the roll of States or towns, is to print the 
complete list of the boarding girls, with their home town, which we 
give below: 
2 



40 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Adams, Gussie Lavine Gary, N . C. 

Allen, Julia Washington Goldsboro, N. G. 

Alston, Ria Live Oak, Fla. 

Badharn, Louise Manning Edenton, N. G. 

Bee, Elizabeth Laidler James Island, S. G. 

Bernhardt, Lily Heilig Salisbury, N. G. 

Blakely, Marguerite Griffin, Ga. 

Bond, Annie Lloyd Tallahassee, Fla. 

Bottum, Margaret Huntington San Diego, Cal. 

Bouknight, Emma Bettis Johnston, S. G. 

Brigham, Gertrude Louise Murray Hill, N. J. 

Broadfoot, Margaret Strange Fayetteville, N. C. 

Brown, Elsie Marguerite Boston, Mass. 

Bruce, Jeannette Harvie Portsmouth, Ta. 

Bruffey, Mildred Lewis Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Budge, Dorothy Wakefield, R. I. 

Burfoot, Ada Aydlett Elizabeth City, N. G. 

Butler, Mary Brown Henderson, N. V. 

Clark, Laura Placidia Scotland Neck, N. G. 

Cleaton, Carrie Portsmouth, Va. 

Cooper, Fannie Spottswood Henderson, N. C. 

Cooper, Julia Horner Oxford, N. C. 

Cooper, Sophronia Oxford, N. G. 

Dehon, Julia Middleton Spartanburg, S. G. 

DeRosset, Tallulah Ellen New York City. 

Douglas, Ruth Preston, Md. 

DuBose, Beverly Means Columbia, S. G. 

Erwin, Margaret Locke West Durham, N. G. 

Pitchett, Prances Elizabeth Cape Charles, Va. 

Ferebee, Katie Attmore Aurora, N. C. 

Fuller, Georgie Bond Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

Gallup, Penelope Morrisette New York City. 

Gaylord, Gretchen Elizabeth Bath, N. G. 

Gilbert, Frederika Mary Lolo, Mont. 

Graves, Mary Franklin Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Green, Bessie Cain Adrian, Ga. 

Griswold, Mary Bryan Durham, N. C. 

Harris, Alice Gibson Franklinton, N. G. 

Hendricks, Nellie Marshall, N. G. 

Herbert, Leone Sydney Morehead City, N. C. 

Hey ward, Sara Kirk Beaufort, S. C. 

Hopkins, Dorothy Nottingham Onancock, Va. 

Hoppe, Laura Margaret Marietta, Ga. 

Hughes, Elizabeth Raleigh, N. C. 

Hunt, Janie Outlaw Oxford, N. G. 

Johnson, Ellen Armistead Knoxville, Tenn. 

Jones, Caroline Clarke Mt. Mitchell, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 41 

Jordan, Margaret Calvert Portsmouth, Ya. 

Josey, Mattie Herring Scotland Neck, N. C. 

King, Ella Tucker Jacksonville, Fla. 

Kyle, Rebecca Devereux Jacksonville, Fla. 

Lamb, Mary Hilliard Henderson, N. 0. 

Larner, Harriette Tampa, Fla. 

Lassiter, Kathryn Blount Hertford, N. C. 

Lassiter, Katharine Leigh Oxford, N. C. 

Leak, Effie Shepherd Wadesboro, N. C. 

Leak, Katherine Mary Wadesboro, N. C. 

Lebby, Lucile Bee Charleston, S. C. 

Lilly, Frances Hinsdale Fayetteville, N. C. 

Lockhart, Caroline Ashe Wadesboro, N. C. 

Magee, Mattille Irwin Wake Forest, N. C. 

Marriott, Emily Battleboro, N. C. 

Martin, Lucinda Gallaway Leaksville, N. C. 

Maxwell, Evelyn Cameron Pensacola, Fla. 

Miller, Fannie Butler Trenton, S. C. 

Morris, Mary Elizabeth Belief onte, Pa. 

Moses, Kathleen Fort Caswell, N. C. 

McCullers, Melba Clayton, N. C. 

McGary, Margaret Elmer Durham, N. C. 

McGehee, Mary Polk Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Mclver, Susie Cheraw, S. C. 

McKenzie, Alice Lorraine Salisbury, N. C. 

McKenzie, Elizabeth Keeling Salisbury, N. C. 

McMullan, Fannie Old Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Nicolson, Elizabeth Quarles Salisbury, N. C. 

Nix, Claudia Catherine Orangeburg, S. C. 

Northrop, Florie Wright Wilmington, N. C. 

Nottingham, Mildred Inez Chesapeake, Ya. 

Owen, Mary Hancock Guatemala, C. A. 

Palmer, Eliza Whitfield Gulf, N. C. 

Patterson, Helen Elaine Wilson, N. C. 

Peace, Bessie Fitz Hugh Wat ha, N. C. 

Pender, Katharine Marriott Tarboro, N. C. 

Peoples, Helen Read Keats, Ya. 

Pinnix, Frances Graves Reidsville, N. C 

Pugh, Lois Savannah, Ga. 

Purvis, Mildred Robersonville, N. C. 

Quinerly, Sallie Bett Ayden, N. C. 

Rawlings, Susan Porter Wilson, N. C. 

Rees, Julia Mayrant Charleston, S. C. 

Reese, Agnes Savannah, Ga. 

Reynolds, Maud Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Rosser, Ruth Atlanta, Ga. 



42 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Rowe, Julia Staton Tarboro, N. C. 

Savage, Sallie Custis Cape Charles, Va. 

Sharp, Josephine Carroll Belhaven, N. C. 

Shields, Nannie Dupree Scotland Neck, N. 0. 

Shull, Zona May Missoula, Mont. 

Sizer, Hattie Elizabeth Bath, N. C. 

Smith, Elizabeth Maund Wilmington, N. C. 

Smith, Josephine Valentine Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Smith, Kate Watson Selma, Ala. 

Smith, Mary Clark Charlotte, N. C. 

Smith, Olive Ernestine Washington, D. C. 

Smith, Patsy Harry Raleigh, N. C. 

Smith, Ruth Walker Macon, Ga. 

Stephenson, Mary Bell Raleigh, N. C. 

Stiles, Elise Gordon Etowah, Ga. 

Stovall, Pleasant Savannah, Ga. 

Strong, Anna Cowan Raleigh, N. C. 

Strong, Frances Lambert Raleigh, N. C. 

Sturgeon, Amelia Pinkney Raleigh, N. C. 

Stevens, Lillie Mae Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Tarry, Elizabeth Anderson Woodioorth, N. C. 

Taylor, Mary Oxford, N. C. 

Trenholm, Katherine Waties Jacksonville, Fla. 

Tucker, Earle Elizabeth Grifton, N. C. 

Turpin, Anne Page Macon, Ga. 

Tyson, Mary Glenn Carthage, N. C. 

Walker, Frances Warner Edenton, N. C. 

Warren, Myrtle Greenville, N. C. 

Webb, Adriana Relay Houston, Va. 

Webb, Ovid Kinsolving. Houston, Va. 

White, Bessie Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Wilkinson, Rosalie Charlotte, N. C. 

Williams, Elinor Furniss Fort Hamilton, N. Y. 

Williams, Julia Maria Ringwood, N. G. 

Williams, Sadie Augusta, Ga. 

Williams, Willie Simpson Ringwood, N. C. 

Williamson, Mary Bonner Graham, N. C. 

Willis, Willie Williamson Waynesville, N. G. 

Windham, Virginia Martin Huntsville, Ala. 

Winstead, Martha Gold Mullins, S. C. 

Winston, Amabel Conyers Raleigh, N. C. 

Wood, Clara Brunswick, Ga. 

Wood, Nellie Robbins Elizabeth City, N. G. 

Woodruff, Jennie Elizabeth Summerville, S. C. 

Wright, Bessie Union Springs, Ala. 

Wright, Helen Cherry Boardman, N. G. 

Wright, Martha Boardman Boardman, N. G. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



43 



The non-resident girls include the following: 

Academic Department 

Adelyn Barbee Margaret Leard 

Mildred Briggs Lizzie Lee 

Susannah Busbee Ruth Lee 

Elizabeth Cherry Eleanor Mann 

Grace Crews Flora McDonald 

Elizabeth Dortch Henrietta Schwartz 

Lucy Dortch Evelyn Sears 

Sarah Fenner Kate Hale Silver 

Mildred Holding Marion Smith 

Sue Kitchin Florence Stone 

Emilie Rose Knox Ethel Swann 

Elizabeth Lay Elizabeth Walker 

Alice Lacy Annie Lee Wynne 

Intermediate Department 

Belle Cameron Julia Jerman 

Bessie Folk Ellen Lay 

Alice Giersch Marie Linehan 

Katherine Hughes Elizabeth Telfair 

Elizabeth Hughes Josephine Williford 

Primary Department 

Wyndham Ashe Nancy Lay 

Elizabeth Baker Lucy Lay 

Katherine Baker Susan Linehan 

Adelaide Boylston Mary Morgan 

Sallie Cameron Roella Robbins 

Elizabeth Cross Virginia Royster 

Florence Harrison Lillias Shepherd 



Randolph Hill 
Mary Hoke 

Lena Barber 
Laura Ball 
Curtice 
Florence Jones 



Mildred Williford 
Alice Woolcott 

Business Department 

Flossie Jones 
Margie King 
Josephine Tonnoffski 



Special Students in Music or Art 

Ester Baker Mattie Lasater 
Mrs. B. W. Bass Hinton 

Louise Bernard Leach 

Bowen Mr. H. G. Miller 

Bowen Frances Park 

Bowen Marion Pickel 

Bowen Frances Sears 

Brown Mildred Yates 
Mary Cain 



44 The St. Maky's Muse. 



EXPERIENCES 



At the Palace of Versailles 



LAURA MARGARET HOPPE. 



One of the most interesting places in the vicinity of Paris is the 
Palace of Versailles, and one should never think of leaving the capital 
without visiting this historic spot, for here Louis XIV and his succes- 
sors lived until the crash of the Revolution. 

It was early one morning that I started out to make this tour, and I 
will never forget the pleasure of that memorable day. 

On approaching the Palace I found myself in a large paved court- 
yard, guarded on each side by equestrian statues of illustrious French- 
men, and I could not but wish that these were able to tell me of the 
many grand military pageants and royal festivities held here, besides 
of those terrible scenes when the infuriated mob made its way to this 
magnificent chateau to demand bread of their king. 

On the left wing of the Palace, opening out from the Royal chambers, 
is a small balcony where I could almost imagine that I saw the fair 
face of Marie Antoinette as Lafayette, hearing the threats of the mob, 
led her out in full view of the crowd. He did not speak, but raised 
the hand of the queen reverently to his lips and instantly the cry of 
"Vive la Peine" ! went up, and a murmur of admiration, for her cour- 
age, ran through the crowd. 

Memories like these enshroud the whole place, and I felt an ever- 
lasting gratitude to Louis Philippe for having restored Versailles. 

Its splendid rooms are filled with magnificent statuary and paint- 
ings, the Gallery of Battles being especially noted for its wonderful 
paintings of the battles won by Napoleon, and also the so-called "Tennis 
Court," where the National Assembly met and established a solid basis 
for French liberty. 

The most imposing of the halls in the Palace is the "Hall of Mirrors," 
deriving its name from the fact that one side of its entire length is 



The St. Mary's Muse. 45 



lined with stately mirrors, opposite which are as many lofty windows. 

Over these polished floors, where once the proud beauties of France 
glided, I as a tourist now went, and although centuries have passed, still 
in those dim old mirrors seem to be reflected the shadowy forms of 
many a courtier and lady. 

On leaving the chateau I wandered out into the immense park, with 
its wonderful fountains and shaded avenues and lawns, which are still 
kept up as beautifully as in the time of the Louis. Perhaps the most 
attractive portion of the park is that which is known as the Petite 
Trianon where Marie Antionette made her rural home and retired from 
the tedious ceremonies of court etiquette. 

A beautiful little lake, surrounded by quaint stone structures and 
picturesque rustic bridges, recall the delightful days of the queen's early 
reign. Here, dressed as a milkmaid, she would spend days in the 
gardens, on the lake, or in her little marble dairy house chatting with 
the peasants as if she were one of them. 

It was considered a great favor to visit here, and only intimate 
friends and persons on whom the queen wished to bestow especial honor 
were brought to this favorite spot. Innocent as were these pleasures, 
they were looked upon by the outside world with suspicion and aided 
much in the undoing of Marie Antoinette. 

Notwithstanding the pleasure I experienced at visiting this place, 
I could not help but feel a certain sadness in knowing that the rooms 
were stripped of some of their beauty and the parks deserted, save by 
tourists, who in wandering through them can merely try to picture the 
splendors of past ages. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Susan Porter Rawlings, Editor. 



The Chorus Class 
The Chorus Class is an especial feature of the Music Department, to 
which all of the music pupils in school belong, and others of the stu- 
dent body whose voices are an addition. It meets twice a week in the 
auditorium, conducted by Mr. Owen. This class was started last year 



46 The St. Maey's Muse. 

and did very creditable work, assisting at the Annual Commencement 
Concert. This year it starts out with a large membership and an 
attractive course mapped out. A great interest has so far been mani- 
fested, which we hope will have an even higher development and help 
make the chorus class a grand success. 



The Literary Societies 



Sigma Lambda 
With the exception of a strictly business meeting of the old mem- 
bers, the first real meeting of the Sigma Lambda Literary Society was 
held Tuesday night, October 3d. The new members were sworn in 
and an outline of the program for the coming year was read. We hope 
that all of the girls will take a keen interest in the society this year, and 
cooperate heartily with the officers in making it of real worth. 

Epsilon Alpha Pi 
After several called meetings — first of all the officers, then of the old 
members — the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society celebrated its first 
formal meeting on Tuesday, October the third, nineteen hundred and 
eleven. At this time about forty new members were "sworn in" — to 
whom all of us old girls extend the heartiest of hearty welcome into 
E A P. After the opening speech of welcome, by the President, and 
the reading the constitution and by-laws by the First Vice-President, 
Miss Zona Skull, accompanied by Miss Luney, sang a charming lyric, 
entitled "The Cuckoo," for us. It was most artistically done, much to 
the delight of her audience. Miss Davis, the expression teacher, then 
came forward and recited several well known poems, most of them by 
James Whitcomb Riley. Miss Davis has a most pleasing and sympa- 
thetic voice, and her selections, showing great ability and knowledge of 
her subjects, charmed her hearers. The programs for the coming year 
were discussed. We decided to make them as interesting, instructive 
and amusing as was possible. We are expecting great things of our 
new members — and we old members are going to do all we can to see 
that they are not disappointed in the society they have joined. Let 
us all put our minds and hearts to it, and make this year, 1911-12, the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 47 

most prosperous year in the history of the E A P Society. There is 
no reason why we shouldn't, and every reason why we should. So 
Sigma Lambdas, beware! 

To Mr. and Mrs. CruiKshanl^ 



Saturday evening, September 30th, was the occasion of the Faculty 
being very delightfully entertained by Misses Thomas and Sutton, in 
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank. The guests were received in Miss 
Thomas's parlor, which was very tastefully decorated in yellow and 
white, yellow lilies being the predominating flower. During the even- 
ing, which was spent most informally, the guests were served with 
salads and ices. The time was particularly enjoyed, as it was the first 
opportunity the Faculty had had of welcoming Mrs. Cruikshank in 
her new home. IT. U. 

The members of the Faculty and a number of Raleigh guests were 
entertained most delightfully on Thursday evening, October 5th, at a 
reception given by Mr. and Mrs. Lay at the Rectory, in honor of Mr. 
and Mrs. Cruikshank. The house was decorated most artistically for 
the occasion in ferns and roses. The receiving line consisted of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lay, Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank, and Mrs. Iredell. Plates were 
passed by the Misses Lay, after which coffee and ices were served on 
the porch, where rugs and benches were cozily arranged. Miss Crafts 
very generously contributed to the pleasure of the evening by rendering 
several violin selections, accompanied by Mr. Owen. During the even- 
ing about fifty guests called. M. S. H. 



School Notes 



We have enjoyed short visits from Isabel Perry, Eleanor Davis, 
Rebecca Wood, Bessie Erwin, Mary Louise Manning, and Julia Borden, 
who were all last year's girls. 

We were all glad to see Miss Buxton, a last year's teacher, at the 
opening. 

We have a good many sisters of "old girls" this year and we always 
have a welcome for them. 



48 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Margaret Bottum is a sister of Frances, who was here '06-08. They 
are from San Diego, Cal. 

Jeannette Bruce is a sister of Katherine, who was here last year. 

Laura Clark is a sister of Anna and Reba. 

Georgie Fuller has had a sister here. 

Penelope Gallup is a sister of Mattie Moffatt, who was here '00 to '02, 
and Mary Lamb is a sister of Olivia, '01-02. 

Carroll Sharp is a sister of Lottie, who is an "old girl." 

Mary Clark Smith is a daughter of Rev. Walter Smith, whom we 
all know in our auxiliary work as being the Head of the Thompson 
Orphanage. 

We have three girls whose fathers are in the army : Elinor Williams, 
Georgie Fuller, and Kathleen Moses. 

Mildred Smith was here for a short visit to Elise on the 27th. 

Alice and Elizabeth McKenzie are with us this year after three 
years at Fassifern. 

Evelyn Maxwell's mother is spending some time at "The Elms." 



It is a general practice at the beginning of each year to have a mass 
meeting in order to tell the "new girls" of the traditions and customs 
of St. Mary's. This meeting was held on September 28th in the school- 
room, presided over by Patsey Smith, representing the Senior Class. 
Each of the Seniors made short talks regarding the girls themselves. 
We hope and believe that the "new girls" will soon take a lively interest 
in this phase of the school life and that these traditions will become 
dear to them. 

The Muse Club had its first meeting on September 24th. This was 
only a short business meeting, and after it Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank 
delightfully entertained the club in their apartments in Senior Hall. 
Dainty refreshments were served and every one enjoyed a thoroughly 
jolly time. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription. One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = s = = s Fifteen Cents. 



A Magizin? published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1911-1912. 

Patsey Harry Smith, Editor-in-Chief. 
Nellie Hendricks, Mary Hancock Owen, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart, Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, 

Elizab th Hughes, Evelyn Cameron Maxwell, Susan Porter Rawlings. 

Am -lia Pinkney Sturgeon, Business Manager. 

, Caroline Clarke Jones, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



Begin Well 



It is the general custom to look upon New Year's Day as the time 
appointed for forming good resolutions to make a fresh start toward 
better endeavor and the more perfect accomplishment of duties. But 
why wait until a day so far distant ? Surely there is no time like the 
present and would it not be infinitely better to at once determine that 
from this time, the beginning of the School's New Year, we will try 
more earnestly to accomplish that which is undertaken — not only work 
with added zeal, but work, taken as a whole, with greater concentrated 
effort ? Let there be a feeling of interest and good will extending from 
the last arriving "Prep" to the oldest Senior here, and may the feeling 
kindle in the entire School that spirit so to be desired, and among 
the classes rivalry, which is, in truth, the "zest of student life and 
activities." 

To "do well" at School does not necessarily mean to study and do 
nothing more. Indeed, the academic is but one of the three departments 
of School life, and we should never become so engrossed in it as to 
completely lose interest in and therefore neglect either athletics or the 
social side. We may be leaders in none of the School activities and 



50 The St. Mary's Muse. 

yet the least we can do is to be interested in all, and if we become 
interested enough to do our individual parts well we need not envy those 
who are fortunate enough to excel in their positions of captaincy. In 
other words, to quote a trifling verse which makes up in good sense what 
it lacks in beauty of phrase, it is possible to 

"Do what you can, being what you are, 
To shine like a glow-worm if you can't be a star." 

And with all the work that we try to do let us make friends and 
become enthusiastic participants in all the fun to be had ! 



The Monthly Muse Board 



With this issue of the Muse the new editors take charge. The 
associate editors have charge of the departments as follows : Misses 
Hendricks and Owen, Literary; Miss Lockhart, Fun; Miss Maxwell, ( 
Verse ; Miss Rawlings, School Notes ; Miss Woodruff, School Calendar. 



The Domestic Science Course 



The Domestic Science Course will prove not only a popular but a 
very valuable addition to the work at St. Mary's. The first course in 
Domestic Science here was given four years ago with Miss Batdorff in 
charge and was a decided success, but conditions made it necessary to 
give up the experiment after one year. A well-equipped Domestic 
Science Kitchen and Laboratory has now been equipped in the Main 
Building and the course has been added regularly to the work offered. 



The Chapel 



It was the custom of Dr. Arnold, of Rugby, to begin the first exercise 
of his Sixth Form with a short prayer, over and above the ordinary 
morning prayer. He told the boys that his reason for so doing was 
to convey to them the thought that everyday work should be consecrated, 
that school business itself should be religious. Such a conviction as 
this of the great English headmaster was and is the feeling of the 



The St. Maey's Muse. 51 

founder of St. Mary's and his successors, and it is for the impressing 
of this conviction upon each of us at St. Mary's that our Chapel stands. 
Its office in our life to hold constantly before us the truth that religion 
is not a garment to be worn an hour or two on one day in the week, but 
a force to be active throughout the waking hours of every day. There- 
fore it is that the Chapel, through its services and its Rector's teachings, 
gives a certain unity to the varied phases and activities of our school 
life, emphasizing that the education which is of high worth is that 
which develops body, intellect, and spirit, each according to its place and 
power, so that she whose mind and heart are receptive may be led to 
strive for control over all faculties and to advance towards an ideal of 
healthy, happy, Christian womanhood. E. W. T. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN-CLIPPINGS 



Man's Shoes 
How much a man is like his shoes, 
For instance, both a soul may lose, 
Both have been tanned, both are made tight 
By cobblers. Both get left and right, 
Both need a mate to be complete, 
And both are made to go on feet. 

They both need healing, oft are sold, 
And both in time will turn to mould; 
With shoes the last is first; with men 
The first shall be the last, and when 
The shoes wear out they're mended new; 
When men wear out they're men dead, too. 

They both are trod upon, and both 
Will tread on others, nothing loath; 
Both have their ties, and both incline 
When polished in the world to shine, 
And both play out. Now would you choose 
To be a man or be his shoes? 



Saint Mary \ aool Library 



52 The St. Mary's Muse. 

What's in a Name 
I know a man whose face is long, 
He never laughs or sings a song — 
His name is Hope. 

I know a man so grum and cross 
For happiness he's at a loss — 
His name is Smiles. 

I know a man who couldn't tell 
What year it was that Carthage fell — 
His name is Wise. 

I know a man who mops his brow 
And says, "Good Lord, it's sizzling now!"- 
His name is Snow. 

I know a man who's always blue, 
No matter what he tries to do — 
His name is Brown. 

I know a man who vows that he 
Will never, never happy be — 
His name is Bliss. 

I know a man who's very high 
And people praise him passing by — 
His name is Lowe. 

I know a man who drags his feet 
And seems too blooming tired to eat — 
His name is Swift. 



The Heroine 
We see the haughty girl advance, 
And sweep the parlor with a glance; 

Thus runs the story. 
But we never see her sweep a room 
With a common, ordinary broom; 

That isn't glory. 

'Tis proper, too, one understands, 
To see her wringing jeweled hands 

And acting frantic. 
But we never see her quit this bosh, 
And go to wringing out the wash; 

That's unromantic. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Virr-PRFimruTa - I Mrs - Kate de R - Me ares, Wilmington. 
honorary vice-presidents j Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

President - Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem. 



EDITORIAL 



One day this summer one of our Alumnae of the 90's was at St. 
Mary's for a few days. She had been rather out of touch with us for 
some years, but became much interested in the work that was being- 
done toward carrying on the campaign for the following year. She 
suddenly remembered that she knew a girl or two in the far South that 
"ought to be at St. Mary's" ; so taking pen and paper she made out 
then and there a careful list of sixteen girls whom St. Mary's was in- 
terested in, either because their mothers were here or who had some 
other connection with the School which should make St. Mary's interest- 
ing to them. The list showed this connection, the name of the girl's 
parents, her age and home address. All of this is mentioned because 
it is just the sort of thing we should like many more of our Alumnse to 
do for us. These lists would be of great value to us. St. Mary's girls 
who have gotten rather far away from us, in both distance and in 
thought, are generally only too glad to have some word from us here, and 
St. Mary's is equally ready to keep in touch with them through their 
daughters. We should be very grateful if such lists might be sent to 
us from time to time by all those who have opportunity to make them. 



Founders' Day, November first, is the day that has been appointed 
for the first of the two meetings held each year by the Alumna? Asso- 
ciation. The Ealeigh branch will meet as usual at St. Mary's, when it 
is hoped that the meeting will be large and spirited. A number of the 



54 The St. Mary's Muse. 

branches are very well organized, notably the New York Chapter, and 
several in the State. It has been demonstrated that these meetings can 
thoroughly carry out all that is desired of them — that is, they can be 
little nuclei for social intercourse where the bond is a closer and more 
vital one than usually unites social gatherings — for it is a chain whose 
links bind us by St. Mary's tradition to the best that there is in the 
past — to what we want to save and to transmit of that past. To the 
present the bond should hold us more closely still, for our best service 
is in knowing the life of St. Mary's as it is now, to know what St. 
Mary's girls everywhere are doing — what the School needs are, and 
where possible to lend our help. And indeed the most welcome help of 
all is to be found in these very meetings — if they have life and signifi- 
cance. What we have said about our service to the present applies 
almost automatically to the future. For work in the present that is of 
value can not terminate there. 

We hope that as many chapters as possible may meet on Founders' 
Day, or as early in November as may be, and that reports may come in 
early to us here. One suggestion we should like to give to all of the 
chapters : At the last meeting of one of the branch Associations a 
motion was carried to have copies printed of the constitution of the 
Association and give each member a copy. This seems an excellent 
scheme, and we offer it for consideration by the other branches. 

M. J. C. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Seligman— f^nowles 

Mr. and Mrs. William Hyer Knowles 

request the honor of your company at the marriage 

of their daughter 

Josephine 

to 

Mr. Joseph Lionel Seligman 

on Thursday, the twenty-ninth of June 

at twelve o'clock 

at Massawippi Lodge 

North Hatley, Canada 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



' It's worth the difference ' 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Traditions 

Once there lived a Senior 
Who didn't pretend to know 

All knowledge worthy to be known — 
Ah! that was long ago! 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALT. KINDS 

MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES A£JP SLIPPERS 



THEBOYLAN-PEARCECO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Herbert Rosenthal 

LADIES' FINE SHOES 



INSURE IN THE 

Jefferson Standard Life Ins. Go. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Strongest in the South 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 



131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOYS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



Once there lived a Freshman 
Who studied night and day; 

Those ideal times when that boy lived 
Have long since passed away! 



NORFOLK 

OYSTE RS 

DAILY 

Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St. Both Phones 356 

HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

ROBERT SIMPSON 

DRUGGIST AND PRESCRIPTIONIST 
GOOD THINGS ALWAYS AT 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY 

EAT 
BETTS' ICE CREAM 



J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 

For Toilet Requisites and 
Colds Drinks 

ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyra 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the onlv perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Fayetteville St. 



KING-CRO WELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, R. S. BUSBEE, 

Secretary. General Manager. 



Once there lived a College Prof. 

Who worked himself to death; 
This class of Prof.'s became extinct 

With his last dying breath. — Ex. 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 
Office 209>£ Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



I. ROSENTHAL 
J CO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING NOTHING 
EXCEEDS THE 

GAS RANGE 

Always Ready. No Dirt. Xo Ashes 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Welsbach, "The Light that Does 
Not Flicker." 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

8 West Martin Street. 



Advertisements. 



DARNELL & THOMAS 
Music House 

Established 1887 

Pianos, Organs, Small Instruments, Sheet 
Music and Instruction Books 



Raleigrh, 



North Carolina 



MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 
OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital $100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

4®" Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 




CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 



Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones: 



174 
226 



THE HOTEL RALEIGH 

INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 



My bonnet spreads over the ocean, 
My bonnet spreads over the sea; 

To merely spread over the sidewalk 
Is not enough for me. 



K I NG * S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

insurance against loss by fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 
THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 
Fayetteville Street 



SEND TO 

Plummets Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 
YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T PUIjLEN, 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and SWpplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson 

PRESIDENT 



F. H. Briggs 

CASHIER 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round steps bank" since 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly &- Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

DR. F. D. CASTLEBURY 

DENTIST 

AYCOCK & WINSTON 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW RALEIGH, N. C. 

JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

Dr. D. E. EVERETT 

dentist 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

22 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 
Garments at our store because we sell better goods 
for less money 

THE FASHION 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

Why is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular? 
ASK THE GIRLS 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N C. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

ANTICEPHALA.LG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



C. E. HARTGE— ARCHITECT 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD-MILLINERY 

13 West Hargett St. Phone 632 

10% off to Faculty and Boarding Pupils 

SHOES 

12 East Martin Street 
PEEBLES & EDWARDS 

DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON 

DENTIST 
116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 



BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Books and Stationery 

113 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

GREEN & WATSON 

Art Store 

11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
Phone 953-R 

217^ Favetteville Street 



N. H. MOORE 

Repairer of Fine Shoes 

Fayetteville Street 



MISS SMITH 

DRESSMAKER 

Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 
Rich Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing promptly done 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th St.=., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



Calendar for 1911-1912. 



1911. 



September 18, Monday: Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 19, Tuesday: Eegistration and Classification of City Pupils; New Board- 
ing Pupils report by 7 p. m. 

September 20, Wednesday: Preliminary Examinations; Old Boarding Pupils report 
by 7 p. m. ; Eegistration and Classification of Boarding Pupils. 

September 21, Thursday: Opening Service of Advent Term (First Half-year) at 

9 a. m. 
November 1, Wednesday: All Saints; Founders' Day. 
November 23, Thursday: Second Quarter begins. 
November 30: Thanksgiving Day. 
December 15-January 3: Christmas Recess. 

1912. 

January 3, Wednesday: All pupils report by 7 p. m. 

January 25, Thursday: Easter Term (Second Half-year) begins. 

February 21, Ash Wednesday: Lent begins. 

March 21, Thursday: Last Quarter begins. 

March 31, Palm Sunday: Annual Visit of the Bishop for Confirmation. 

April 5, Good Friday: Holy Day. 

May 12, Sunday: Alumnae Day; 70th Anniversary of the Founding of St. Mary's. 

May 16, Thursday: Ascension Day. 

May 26-May 28: Commencement Season. 

September 19, Thursday: 71st Session begins. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



70th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1911. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1912. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: £. THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1911-12 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty -eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 



Rev. George W. Lay, 



Rector. 



fet. JWarp's fflu&t 



iioUcnibrr, I Oil 



^allotoe'en dumber 




ftaieisf), Ji C 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

HALLOWE'EN NUMBER. 
Vol. XV. I November, 1911. No. 3 

Hallowe'en 



the night is Hallowe'en, 

And I'm creeping down the stair; 

1 can feel the rising hair upon my head, 
But my fortune I must test — 
Mirror, candle and the rest — 

So bravely I have left my downy bed. 

this horrid creaking stair, 

And those shadows skulking there; 

And just see this candle nicker in the hall, 

See that gleam of ghostly white 

And that horrid sickly light! 
Ah, there's mystery and terror in it all. 

1 really think I'll wait, 
The task is much too great 

For maidens of my temp'rament, I ween; 

'Tis better far to sleep 

Than at the future peep 
On ghostly night at twelve of Hallowe'en. 

M. 



The Origin of Hallowe'en 



Mart Brown Butler. 



Who would willingly forego the joys of Hallowe'en ? That mystic 
time of the year when pumpkins, candles, spooks, witches, and all their 
attendants are called into play! On that night little children revel in 
all sorts of conjectures and imaginings, hut they think little about the 



58 The St. Mary's Muse. 

reason for all this fun and sport. They take it as a matter of course 
that if they should put their heads out of doors after dark on Hal- 
lowe'en, they would be likely to see an old witch floating above them 
on a broomstick. The origin of the feast of Hallowe'en is most 
interesting. 

Hallowe'en or All Hallows' Eve — the night of October 31 — is the 
popular name for the eve of All Saints' or All Hallows' Day. From 
being first celebrated on May 1, the date was subsequently changed to 
November 1, and under the designation of Feast of All Saints was set 
apart as a general commemoration in their honor, and as such is still 
retained by our Church. In Roman Catholic countries it is the custom 
on that day to visit the cemeteries for devotion and to lay flowers on the 
graves of friends and relatives. 

The "Hallowe'en" has nothing "churchy" about it, and seems to be a 
relic of pagan times, or perhaps of mediaeval superstition. It was 
regarded as the time of all others when supernatural influences prevail, 
and as a night which is set apart for a universal walking abroad of 
spirits, both of the visible and the invisible world; for on this mystic 
night it was thought that even the human spirit might detach itself 
from the body and wander abroad. Hallowe'en seems chiefly allied to 
the "Walpurgis Night" of the Germans, the witch-festival or assembling 
of evil spirits on the summit of the Brohen in the Hartz Mountains on 
the eve of May 1 — the day which was originally dedicated to the Chris- 
tian martyrs or saints. 

In Great Britain and the United States, however, the night is 
devoted to merry-making and the divination of the future. Practically 
as far as we know the evening, it is devoted to sport and practical jokes. 
Nuts and apples are in great demand — the former giving the name 
"Nutcrack Night" to Hallowe'en in the South of England. We not 
only crack and eat them, but also use them often as a means of solving 
our "love affairs." It is believed by children that an apple peel thrown 
over your left shoulder will foretell the initials of the one who will be 
most closely connected with you in future life. An apple is also put in a 
tub of water ; if it floats and bobs along on the surface, he "loves you ; 
otherwise, you are doomed to eternal unhappiness." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 59 



The Magic of Hallowe'en 



Patsey Harry Smith. 



The night was wild indeed and outside the wind howled quite eerily. 
Within a large and high-ceiled apartment sat a very old little lady, who 
gazed intently into the glowing depths of a large open fire which by its 
glow shed a rosy light about the room, bringing out the color in the 
dainty hangings and the intricate carving and inlaying of the ma- 
hogany furnishings. Was this quaint little creature conjuring out of 
the leaping flames faces once familiar but now seen no more, or, could 
she have been thinking of sorrows borne and pleasures never to be for- 
gotten ? Perhaps she had quite forgotten how many were the years that 
had passed and was recalling days when her youth and beauty caused no 
little stir in all social circles with which she became associated. But 
whatever may have been her idle dreamings, they were rudely put to 
an end by a door at the further end of the apartment being thrust open 
to allow the hasty entrance of two girls, the smaller of whom ran, rather 
than walked, over to the fire-side, fairly dragging her tall and seem- 
ingly more reserved companion after her. Sinking down upon a small 
ottoman by the side of the little old lady's chair, and catching up one of 
the small hands she impetuously exclaimed : 

"Oh, Grandmother ; I know it is late — I was so afraid vou'd be in 

7 7 «/ 

bed, and really I simply had to see you, for here is this stupid, unimagi- 
native Elizabeth declaring to me that she doesn't believe a single ghost 
ever even heard of Hallowe'en, and that nothing ever happened on Hal- 
lowe'en night except masked dances and parties that could be just as 
appropriately given any other time in the year. Not a thing I can say 
convinces her, and so I've come straight to you, and if only you will tell 
her of your Hallowe'en ghost she'll never talk so again !" 

"And so you refuse to believe that there is a magic in Hallowe'en ?" 
questioned the little old lady, turning towards Elizabeth and gently 
drawing her down to a seat opposite her granddaughter. "Well, as to 
my story that Janet avers will lead you into doing so, I need no such 
urging to induce me to tell it — why, do you know, I was just thinking 
of my — my Hallowe'en ghost when you two came in." The voice of 



60 The St. Mary's Muse. 

the little old lady was very soft and sweet, and as she said this last a 
fleeting smile of infinite tenderness lighted up her features. For a few 
moments she gazed meditatively into the fire and then: 

"It was upon a night equally as tempestuous as this, almost fifty 
years ago. I was only seventeen then. I remember it as if it were but 
yesterday. My two small brothers, both of whom had retired ; my aunt, 
an invalid who rarely left her chair ; Mammy Jane, an old and faith- 
ful negress, and I, were alone in our large, old-fashioned house, every 
nook and corner of which seemed filled with a dreary sadness upon that 

night. The division of the Southern army under General 

was stationed about five miles distant from my home, and upon the 
afternoon of the night of which I speak a message was brought to my 
mother saying that my father had been seriously wounded the day 
before in an encounter with some Union troops which were even then 
not far away. Immediately my mother took the only horse left us and 
a young negro, the son of Mammy Jane, and started for the Confederate 
camp. So a racking suspense was added to the gloom occasioned by a 
night upon which the wind shook all the casements and by frequent 
gusts blew the half-sleety rain that had commenced to fall, against the 
window-panes. The three of us were very nervous and I remember 
that when the door of the outer hall slammed I took a candle and 
explored every nook and cranny of the long hall. After vain attempts 
at trying to concentrate my attention in talking to my aunt concerning 
the outcome of that horrible war, and having poked the fire until im- 
plored to desist, I bade my aunt and the old negress good-night and 
determined to try to forget my anxiety in sleep. My room, opening into 
the one in which Harold and James were sleeping, was up stairs, and I 
took a candle and with it hastened up the long flight of stairs. On each 
side of the mirror to my dresser were fastened some sconces and I 
hurriedly crossed over to light the candles in them. I lighted the one 
upon the right and was turning to light the remaining one when, hap- 
pening to glance into the mirror I saw over my left shoulder the face of 
a man. At first I thought it was merely some wild trick of my fancy, 
occasioned by my disturbed state of mind, and wheeled around to prove 
that it was so. On turning I came to gaze full into the dark eyes of a 



The St. Maey's Muse. 61 

tall man in the uniform of a Southern soldier. Before I could move he 
stepped forward and said, in a low and well-modulated voice : 

" 'It grieves me to have frightened you. Please do not crv out, and I 
hope you will pardon this necessary intrusion when I tell you that I 
am seriously in need of a hiding place, having only temporarily 
thrown my pursuers off my track. I must be brief, for already I fancy 
I hear sounds other than that of the wind. Is there an attic, cellar, 
secret closet, or any place wherein I might conceal myself V 

"For a few moments it seemed as though it was an utter impossi- 
bility either to move or speak. Besides the effect of being so startled 
there was now added the awful knowledge that it depended upon me to 
save a Southern soldier from danger — perhaps death. Suddenly a 
loud knocking upon the door downstairs called me out of my semi- 
paralyzed state. What precious moments had been lost ! In seconds 
that seemed an eternity I ran over in my mind all possible places in 
which a person might be concealed. Then, I've never known by what 
luckv chance, I thought of the small attic-like room under one of the 
eaves of the house. Originally there was no opening into this room — 
but a fire having started on the roof a hole was made in the ceiling of 
my room to get to it, and this room was discovered. This opening had 
never been again nailed up and only a kind of trap door placed over it 
This trap door was directly over my head and could not be seen except 
by one in the bed, for the curtains of my four-poster which hung from 
the ceiling were about two or more feet wide. It was only the work 
of a few minutes to place a chair upon the bed, by means of which the 
tall stranger reached the trap door and pulled himself up into his 
hiding place. Scarcely had I straightened the bed and taken a seat by 
my dresser as if in the act of arranging mv hair for the night when 
the steps I had heard ascending the stair stopped before my door and 
two men in great coats so faded and weather worn that I could not 
tell whether they were blue or grey, after being ushered into the room,, 
began to search it from top to bottom, asking in a peremptory manner 
if I had seen a skulking Yankee spy somewhere about. A Yankee 
spy ! Did they think me so simple as to be duped by such a ruse ? 
Yankee indeed ! They could not find where my Southern soldier was 
2 



62 The St. Mary's Muse. 

bidden for all their changing about of names ! I don't see bow I lived 
through the ordeal of that search, but finally, having apparently satis- 
fied themselves that to continue further search or questionings there 
would be useless, the leader of the two, after making excuses for the 
trouble occasioned, gave orders that the men stationed about the house 
should be called off, and soon their footsteps were but faint echoes in 
the distance. At last the house resumed its former quietness and not 
long after the pursued soldier made his way out of his hiding-place and 
by the light of a candle I led him down a side stairs leading to an out- 
side door far removed from the room in which my aunt was sleeping. 
Upon reaching the door my companion seemed about to depart without 
further words, having already, as we descended, whispered his thanks, 
when he turned and exclaimed in evident distress of mind : 

" 'I can not leave without telling you of the grievous wrong I've done 
you. I am no Southern soldier, but a Union spy, one whose mission, 
however, was a fruitless one. How you must scorn me ! As for me — 
well, in battle I've learned to respect Southern manhood, and tonight, 
though under adverse circumstances, I am yet thankful for having come 
in contact with the higher type of Southern womanhood. This war will 
not last forever. When it is over — then I will come to ask if you 
believe in the magic of Hallowe'en !' 

"Before I could speak he caught my hand, raised it to his lips, bowed 
low, and then opening the door was swallowed up in the darkness 
without." 

For a few moments it seemed that the gentle voice would carry the 
story to no further ending. Then the little old lady arose from her 
chair, crossed the room to a small cabinet from one of the drawers of 
which she took a small plush box and returning to the fireside she said, 
as she resumed her seat: 

"That night was the 31st of October, 18G3, and this, my dear, is a 
picture of your grandfather that you have seen so often, Janet. He 
did come back and find that I did believe, unlike you, Elizabeth, in 
the magic of Hallowe'en, that magic which, if tradition holds true, 
makes it an infallible truth that if a man's face in the mirror on All 
Hallowe'en you see, that man your future lord will be. Yes, my dears, 
this is a miniature of my Hallowe'en ghost. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 63 



Two Hallowe'ens 



Evelyn Cameron Maxwell 



The night was dark and gloomy, 
The shadows deep and still, 

And the grewsome forms of goblins 
Danced over dale and hill. 

And out against the blackness 
There showed in ghastly hosts, 

The even blacker witches 

And the palest of white ghosts. 

For all the evil spirits 

Some mischief came to weave, 

And roamed abroad in legions 
On the first "All Hallow's eve." 

But now it is quite different, 

And on Hallowe'en night 
The parlor's gay and mystic 

With Jack O'Lantern light. 

A merry throng is gathered 

In every known costume, 
And to lively strains of music 

They march around the room. 

The court dame and the clown arrive 
In company with a "spook," 

And after them "The Bingville Band," 
And maybe then a duke. 

But not a bit of terror 

Is inspired by this weird scene, 
For it is very modern — 

A St. Mary's Hallowe'en. 

And now that both these different kinds 

Have been put to the test, 
I'm sure you really, truly think 

That our way is best. 



64 The St. Maky's Muse. 



EXPERIENCES 



Shocking the Natives 



Harriette Larner. 



It happened this way : Mamma and I were staying at my grand- 
father's house, in a small town in Suffolk, England. I was only about 
ten years old, and I had no playmates, for British children are most 
impossible to get acquainted with. And to be held under the restraint 
of the English god, convention, on a summer afternoon like that ! One 
simply had to do something — but there was nothing to do. These were 
such a proper, circumspect people, and mamma and I so thoroughly free 
and easy, as befits Americans. Speaking of Inevitable Consequences — 
indeed, one might expect trouble. 

And I'm thinking mamma felt my restlessness, for she fell in easily 
with my suggestions. We did so love to shock the natives ! I had a 
tight little pair of bloomers, mamma had a bicycle cap — and grandpa 
was puttering around in his back garden. You will remember the 
parable of the talents — what, then, are such opportunities but talents ? 

With my hair caught up and hidden by the boy's cap, and dressed in 
blouse, bloomers and a boyish air of bravado, I slipped out. Faith, and 
I barely evaded the watchful eye of the grandsire. My aunt, who had 
several lady friends visiting her, lived on the other side of town. I had 
to go down the main business street, and it would seem that in spite of 
my manly tread, people regarded me with the glittering light of suspi- 
cion in their eyes. Some even laughed. I was a trifle disconcerted at 
this when I noticed two dirty little street Arabs following me. I walked 
faster, and one said to the other: "Aw, g'wan, cully — that hain't no 
boy ; that's a girrul. It's got hair." 

I ran. Indeed, that was a false move, for they ran too, whooping 
and throwing things at me. Their various friends and associates joined 
chase. My aunt lived on the Promenade, a long avenue on the water 
front. I turned a few corners, most of them unnecessary ones — knocked 
a little Irish woman down — who called me a "warrthliss sphalpeen," — 
and finally reached the Promenade. Think — there were ladies on the 



The St. Mary's Muse. G5 

beach, ladies on the walk, ladies at big bay windows, and on little up- 
stairs porches ! 

I came tearing along and into my aunt's house, literally falling up 
the stairs and in the parlor, where she and her guests were having 
afternoon tea. There were little shrieks of holy horror and a broken 
tea-cup or two, for I had lost my cap and my hair was hanging down in 
a truly girlish fashion — but the bloomers ! Sacriste ! There was surely 
a strong element of humor in the whole situation, and I, for one, giggled. 

Not so with my poor auntie. She was shocked to death. She did hate 
a scene worse than anything. But she gave me some tea and sent a 
servant to the other house to get me a dress, in order that I might go 
home — decently clothed and in my right mind. 

Nothing more was ever said about the matter, and she had refused 
to hear my explanations, or anything whatever about it. And there 
was that in my heart which told me to desist from any further attempt 
to shock the natives. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Susan Porter Rawlings, Editor. 



October 6th: Reception to the Seniors 

None of the many invitations which the St. Mary girls are so fortun- 
ate in receiving are appreciated like those to the Rectory. 

On Friday last, the sixth of October, Mrs. Lay entertained the sen- 
iors : Patsey Smith, Elizabeth Hughes, Nellie Hendricks. Mary Owen, 
Margaret Broadfoot, Lina Lockhart, Fannie McMullan, and a few other 
girls : Susan Rawlings, Margaret Erwin, Amy Winston, Caroline 
Jones, Emily Marriott, Amelia Sturgeon, and Zona Shull. Mrs. Lay 
always greets us in such a manner that we feel she is one of us, and on 
this occasion she proved unusually cordial. She knows the way to a 
schoolgirl's heart — ours were won when the refreshments were served — 
for Mrs. Lay had prepared dainty, delicious plates for us. Chicken salad 
on lettuce, oyster cock-tail, olives and sandwiches was the first course, 
followed by frozen mousse and cake, and lastly hot chocolate with 
whipped cream. The present-day St. Mary girl will always remember. 



66 The St. Mart's Muse. 

in connection with their lives here, the beautiful influence of Mrs. Lay, 
and the generous hospitality of both Mr. and Mrs. Lay. 

Amy Winston. 

October 7th: Mr. K^ar\ Jansen, Impersonator 

The evening of October 7th was a most enjoyable one. Mr. Karl 
Jansen, the Swedish impersonator, humorist, and master of Swedish 
gymnastics, and an actor of no little merit, at one time under the great 
Mansfield himself, gave an entertainment in the Auditorium. Mr. 
Jansen has a very decided accent, but this added to rather than detracted 
from the interest of the occasion. The program lasted a little more 
than an hour and a half, and through it all Mr. Jansen's skill, person- 
ality and perfect ease of manner made it a pleasure to be of the audience. 

He began by telling something of far off Sweden and Norway, graph- 
ically depicting the characteristics of the summer when the sun never 
sets, and painting word pictures of the bitter northern winter when 
the forest trees bend under their loads of ice and snow — realistic imi- 
tations being given of the howling of the wolves ; the melancholy sigh- 
ing and shrill shrieking of the north wind ; the groaning, creaking and 
crashing of the breaking ice ; and the weird awe-inspiring tolling of the 
midnight bell, likened to the bells in one of the verses of Poe's famous 
poem, which verse Mr. Jansen rendered exceedingly well. 

The entire program was thoroughly entertaining, but the parts most 
enjoyed were the excellent impersonation of Richard III in the Ghost 
Scene from Shakespeare's play ; the "old fashioned Commencement" ; 
the Swedish song of the actor's own translation ; "How the Americans, 
English, French, Germans and Italians make love" ; and "An Old 
Sweetheart of Mine." 

Mr. Jansen, to make his impersonations more realistic, twice changed 
his costume, and the intervals thus occasioned were made very enjoy- 
able by the songs of little Miss Park, who came from the City Schools 
at Mr. Jansen's request to sing at the entertainment. P. H. S. 

October 9th: first Faculty Recital 

Miss Crafts, Violinist, Assisted by Miss Luney, Pianist 
The first recital of the year was given by Miss Crafts, assisted by 
Miss Lunev. Miss Crafts beina; a "new teacher" we did not know what 



The St. Mary's Muse. 67 

was in store for us as we did about Miss Limey. AVe were all delighted 
with Miss Crafts and as Miss Luney even surpassed our highest expecta- 
tions we spent a very pleasant evening. The program was as follows : 

L 

Concerto in E minor Mendelssohn 

(First Movement.) 

II. 

(a) Romance Sinding 

(b) Serenade, Op. 4 d'Ambrosio 

(c) Air de Ballet Adamowski 

III. 

(a) On the Holy Mount Dvordk 

(&) Arabesque Debussy 

Miss Luney. 

IV. 
Serenade — Melancholique Tschaikowsky 

V. 
Scherzo-Tarantelle, Op. 16 Wieniawski 

The News and Observer said : 

Miss Blanche L. Crafts, in her violin recital last evening, gave an artistic 
account of herself in a difficult and varied program, and proved beyond question 
that she is a valuable addition to the music circles of Raleigh. 

The opening number was Mendelssohn's Concerto in E minor, a brilliant 
classic whose elegance of style and wealth of melody were admirably revealed. 

The next was a group number effectively arranged and charmingly played: 
(a) Romance, by Sinding; (b) Serenade, by d'Ambrosio; (c) Air de Ballet, by 
Adamowski. 

The third number on the program was a piano solo played by Miss Bertha 
Luney. This was an (a) and (b) number "On the Holy Mount," by Dvorak, 
and an "Arabesque" by Debussy, calling for a widely differing tone quality and 
character of interpretation. Miss Luney was equally at home in the serious de- 
votional spirit of the first and in the dainty exquisite tracery of the "Arabesque." 

Tonally, Tschaikowsky's "Serenade-Melancholique" satisfied the audience im- 
mensely, and was well played. 

The program closed with the Scherzo-Tarantelle, of Wieniawski, a rather daz- 
zling work with heavy demands upon the technique, which was not found want- 
ing, but which did not obscure the player's mastery of phrasing and scholarly 
interpretation. 

The program throughout was notable for strength, dignity and clearness of 
expression. 



G8 The St. Maky's Muse. 



Annual Receptions of the Literary Societies 



October 14th: Epsilon Alpha Pi 

On Saturday evening, October 14th, the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary 
Society held its annual reception, to which were invited the new mem- 
bers of the Society, the officers of the Sigma Lambda Society, and the 
members of the faculty. 

The parlor, where the guests were received by the officers of both 
Epsilon Alpha Pi and Sigma Lambda, was beautifully decorated in the 
colors of the society, green and gold. From the central chandelier to 
the four corners of the room ropes of evergreen were suspended, and 
diagonally opposite each other were two tables, banked with goldenrod, 
where a delicious fruit punch was served by Agnes Reese and Bessie 
White and Elizabeth Morris. 

Immediately after the reception a card dance was enjoyed by all the 
guests, the German, during which most attractive favors were given, 
being led by Miss Urquhart and Miss Hayward. During the intermis- 
sion delightful refreshments, consisting of a salad course and ices and 
cakes, were served. Lota Lockhart. 

October 21st: Sigma Lambda 

The Saturday night "suitors" waiting on the porch of Main Building 
for admittance into their promised land, the School Room, gazed into 
the hall and stared in open-eyed amazement. And no wonder, for what 
a sight met their astonished eyes : There congregated in the hall were 
almost twenty-five powdered and painted and patched ladies of "the days 
of long ago" — those days of love and war, of mighty deeds and courtly 
ways, when all ladies were fair and all men brave ; those old, romantic 
days, which are, alas ! no more. 

However, this sad fact did not trouble the A. & M. "suitors," and 
they continued to gaze in wonder (for how were they to know it was the 
annual Sigma Lambda reception, only this time in costume) as more 
and more of the bepowdered ladies descended the stairs and waited, 
talking and laughing all the while, for the Parlor doors to open. 

At last, when the eight o'clock bell had rung — a joyful sound to 
"suitors" and ladies alike — the doors were opened and disclosed a long 



The St. Mary's Muse. 69 

powdered and painted receiving line, the officers of Sigma Lambda and 
of Epsilon Alpha Pi, which surely must have struck terror to the on- 
lookers, for it even caused a hush to fall on the most joyful and happy 
of the laughing Colonial maids. Finally one was bold enough to be 
the first to brave the graceful curtseys and low bows, and when the last 
one had disappeared the closing doors shut the whole brilliantly lighted 
scene from the eyes of the "suitors." 

Alas ! that they were destined to see no more. For how they would 
have reveled in the beautifully decorated Parlor with its gay and happy 
occupants, with their powdered hair and coquettish patches. Various 
and different indeed were the dames flitting from table to table. Some 
were tall and slim ; others short and fat ; some were blondes, some bru- 
nettes ; some clad in gay-flowered pink, others in filmy blue ; some had 
Psyche knots, others graceful Janyce Meredith curls ; some were light- 
hearted and gay, others dignified and prim ; but one and all joined in the 
laughter and gay confusion which filled the room, as friends were rec- 
ognized in presumable strangers. 

Nor did the babble cease until the appearance of refreshments, which 
consisted of fruit salad with mayonnaise sauce, followed by yellow 
and white ice cream, daintily served with the favors, yellow chrysanthe- 
mums, to carry out the yellow color scheme. 

After this came the most enjoyable feature of the evening, the dancing 
of the old-fashioned stately Virginia reel, though if our great-great- 
great-grandmothers could have had a peep in at the dance they would 
have been much shocked at the manner in which these ladies, in blissful 
ignorance of the turns and twists so familiar to them, went through 
the mazes of the reel. But even the most prejudiced of observers would 
have had to admit that these latter day dames were quite as pretty as 
their forerunners. 

All too soon the nine-thirty bell rang — right in the midst of "Home, 
Sweet Home," for the Colonial dames were now waltzing and "two- 
stepping" away in the latest twentieth century style, perfectly happy 
and content. With many a sigh and rustle of silken skirt, the guests 
departed in a cloud of powder, and the great Sigma Lambda reception 
was over, but pronounced by all to be the most enjoyable event of the 
year, not even excepting the Fair ! Melba McCtjllers. 

3 



70 The St. Mary's Muse. 



October 18th: "The Great State Fair" 

" State Fair Day" — that precious day on which we have the privilege 
of wandering out to the Fair Grounds (a very dignified wandering 
and well chaperoned) and spending an afternoon in being educated by 
the exhibits, agricultural and otherwise, watching the fakirs and patron- 
izing the "great side-shows," with an occasional glimpse at the races or 
the balloon ascension or the aeroplane flight ; coining home at five laden 
with "squedunks" and balloons and red candy and toy dogs and such like 
treasures for those of our less fortunate sisters as seemingly lack the 
faculty of enjoying such delightful hilarity — that great day of 1911 
is over. 

As we look back at it, it was not so very different from other State 
Fair Days. Perhaps mindful of that familiar little verse, 

There was a young lady named May — 
Who was perhaps just a bit gay: 

She went to the Fair 

And flirted while there, 
The train took her home the next day. 

we were on our usual good behavior, for there were no evil consequences 
of our visit. We had a very good time and saw many old friends. 
Why even the "trained fleas" were there. Perhaps nothing will recall 
the Fair more pleasantly than to remember what our friend "Ducky" 
had to say of the like occasion in 1909. Mary Shuford told about it in 
the October Muse that year: 

"DUCKY" AT THE FAIR. 

At last the long-looked-for Fair of 1909 has come and gone and all the excite- 
ment of anticipation and realization is over. Our chief authority on the subject 
is "Ducky," whose unbiased appreciation is never tempered with regret of past 
pleasures. 

"Honey," Ducky said, in rehearsing all her wonderful experiences, "Honey, I 
seen so much I jest don't know whar to begin, but there was one thing I'll tell 
you 'bout — 'Old Mammy Jane' — she knit with her elbows — yes, darlin', her 
elbows. They said as how she was an ol' witch and got her arms burnt off 
some way and now when she says 'Howdy do' to anybody it'll bring 'em good 
luck. Anyhow, I seen her crochet with her elbows, myself. Sugar, she stuck 
her needles in them little places where the bone used to be and knit better'n I 
could. 

"Then I seen an old nigger do the 'rag-time dance.' He was all spotted up — 
a black spot here and a white one there, all over his face, and when he danced 



The St. Mary's Muse. 71 

he kicked up his heels to his nose — honest, honey — no, I didn't see him hit his 
nose, but he come mighty nigh doing it. He sho' did dance lively. 

"A little farther down they had a show with the ugliest little woman in it. 
She was just about so high and fat — ugh! She was a sight, and her jaw stuck 
out and her nose come down 'till they most meet. When I come out the man 
axed me to give all the people standing 'round my opinion of what I thought of 
the show, and so I stood up and told 'em it was truly fine — it was only ten cents, 
but it was certainly worth a quarter. Then they all hollered and laughed and 
a man asked me if I had ever seen a 'snake eater.' I told him, 'Lord-a-massy, 
no,' and he said, 'You come on, then.' So he took me up to where a man was 
sitting in a big tin pan and he was all a-growling and snakes crawling all over 
him, and his teeth — . Sugar, you never seen such teeth; they was that long and 
all pointed — and he bit into the snakes, going 'g-r-r-r-r.' I said, 'Master, help 
me— lemme git out of here.' 

"And next thing I went up to see the oscrades — yes'm, you know them 
things — you git feathers out of 'em. Yes'm, I knew it was something like that — 
'oscrades' — I can't say it like you do, so let's call 'em birds — the man he called 
'em birds, and, honey, he said they was so strong they could knock a horse down 
with one wing and then he went and got on one and rode him up and down 
jest like a horse. 

"Oh, but, darlin' — the funniest thing I ever seen in all my life. Sugar, it was 
them trained hoppergrasses and crickets! Honey, it beat the world — they drug 
little wagons round like they was working for their living, and I 'bout died 
laughing. The man axed if I ain't ever seen any before. I told him, 'Honey, 
I've seen many things, but I ain't never seen a trained hoppergrass like that 
before' — oh! yes, and fleas, too — trained fleas. I was that tickled he let me stay 
in for another round. Darlin', it was worth a lot. No 'm, I can't tell you any 
more, 'cause if I don't clean up I'll git into trouble, but, sugar, you jest ought to 
have seen them crickets — you missed a sight." 



SCHOOL NOTES 



Mary Louise Manning and Bessie Erwin spent Saturday, October 7, 
up here at school. Mary Louise comes over every Saturday from Dur- 
ham to take voice from Mr. Owen. 

Josephine Smith has returned to school. She was late on account of 
sickness. 

We are glad to welcome three new girls this month : Kathryn Las- 
siter, from Oxford ; Thomasine Edwards, from Smithfield, Va., and 
Mary Bryan Griswold, from Durham. 

Sophronia and Julia Cooper have enjoyed a short visit from their 
mother this month. 



72 The St. Maky's Muse. 

Thursday night, October 12th, the Bector made a talk in the school- 
room on "Ignorance and Knowledge." It was thoroughly enjoyed and 
we hope it will prove of great benefit to all the hearers. 

Tuesday night, October 17th, most of the girls went down to the 
opening of the new auditorium. It was very enjoyable, especially the 
speech made by Governor Judson Harmon, of Ohio. 

There were a good many visitors during Fair week. Helen Patter- 
son, Fannie Cooper, Janie Hunt, Mildred BrufTy, Earl Tucker, Mary 
Bryan Griswold, Sallie Quinerly, all enjoyed seeing their mothers. 

Mary Franklin Graves, Mary Tyson, Ruth Bosser, Katherine L. Las- 
siter, Lina Lockhart, Mary Clark Smith, and Nannie Shields are among 
the girls who have had short visits from their brothers. 

Myrtle Warren and Leone Herbert and Nellie Wood have had their 
sisters with them. 

Annie McGehee, a last year's girl, was at the School a few days dur- 
ing the month. 

Mildred Purvis and Sue May De Visconti had short visits from their 
fathers. 

Martha Ferebee, from Oxford, and Blair Bawlings, from Wilson, 
two "old girls," spent the day at School October 20. 

Marion Haigh, who was with us last year, was here for a short while 
during Fair week. 



What Determines 



One ship sails east, another sails west, 
With the selfsame winds that blow; 

'Tis the set of the sail, and not the gale, 
That tells us the way they go. 

Like the winds of the sea are the ways of Fate, 
As we voyage along through life; 

'Tis the set of the soul that decides our goal, 
And not the calm or the strife. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 73 



IN LIGHTER VEIN-CLIPPINGS 



Bits of Optimism 
An optimist and pessimist — 

The difference is droll. 
The optimist sees the doughnut, 

The pessimist sees the hole. 



Don't you hunt foh trouble; 

Jis' ten' to what you's got. 
It ain't no special credit 

Even if you fin's a lot. 



No use in sighin' — 

Tellin' of yo' woe! 
Ef you can't swim de river, 

You must let de river go! 



It hain't no use to grumble and complain; 

It's jest as cheap and easy to rejoice. 
When God sorts out the weather and sends rain, 

W'y rain's my choice. — Riley. 



The Way to Tak.e It 

Dis de way to take it 

In a worl' er loss: 
Ef you can't swim the river, 

Let de yuther feller cross! 
Maybe w'en he swim it — 

Stemmin' er de tide — 
He'll light on a ferryboat 

On de yuther side! 



Tarry Not 
The road to yesterday — 

Why travel it? 
A tangled skein, so why 

Unravel it? 
The future calls you on, 

The past is dead, 
And all you hope to do 

Lies just ahead. 



74 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Chemical 
Said Atom unto Molly Cule, 

"Will you unite with me?" 
And Molly Cule did quick retort, 

"There's our affinity." 

Under electric light plant's shade 
Poor Atom hoped he'd meet her, 

But she eloped with a villain base, 
And now his name's Salt Petre. 



The Heroine 

We see the haughty girl advance, 
And sweep the parlor with a glance; 

Thus runs the story. 
But we never see her sweep a room 
With a common, ordinary broom; 

That isn't glory. 

'Tis proper, too, one understands, 
To see her wringing jeweled hands 

And acting frantic. 
But we never see her quit this bosh 
And go to wringing out the wash; 

That's unromantic. 



Football 
Sing a song of football, 

Don't it make you smile? 
Two and twenty players 

Struggling in a pile; 
When the pile is opened, 

Hear those awful groans; 
Boys begin to creep out, 

Looking for their bones. 
Sections there of noses, 

Patches here of hair, 
But they made a touchdown, 
And little do they care. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. s » = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the studsnls and Aiumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1911-1912. 

Patset Harry Smith, Editor-in-Chief. 
Nellie Hendricks, Mary Hancock Owen, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart, Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Evelyn Cameron Maxwell, Susan Porter Rawlings. 

Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon, Business Manager. 
Caroline Clarke Jones, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIALS 



Tempus F u 9it 



What, time flies when you're ofr at school ? Time flies when you're 
far from home — when it's about two months before Christmas and when 
after Christmas there are five long months before vacation % Yes, the 
days simply scurry past, notwithstanding the above reasons for the 
school term's being of unending duration, and, strange to say, the time 
after Christinas seems shorter than before, for, you see, every one 
knows everybody else by then and there's Easter to be looked forward to, 
the many entertainments in the auditorium, the chapter plays, inter- 
society debate, and before any one can realize it preparations for com- 
mencement recitals, theatricals and graduating exercises are upon us. 
Really once you get started days seem too short and even before Christ- 
mas girls who have been most home-sick are ready to agree that not only 
does time fly, but that the time has flown on wings of lightning rapidity. 



Sh 



The Muse does not at all approve of this editorial, and therefore 
would much prefer to give utterance to it in mere whispers. If there 
is one word odious to The Muse it is that word "gossip," and if there 



76 The St. Mary's Muse. 

is anything of which The Muse is more weary than of that word it is 
the expression, "Do not gossip." So this year it refuses to give publica- 
tion to any article even hinting at the aforesaid hated subject, and if 
we will try to be more broad-minded, try to do our work, and just be 
willing to share our fun with our fellow-students, gossip will die the 
death it has long deserved. 



In the Chapel 



The Chapel and that part of the school life that centers around it 
must always play an important part in a St. Mary's girl's life and ex- 
periences. And it has seemed that thus far this session the Chapel and 
its services have been even more than usual stimulating and impressive. 

The opening service, with Bishop Cheshire's well-put words remind- 
ing that real success in school life as in later life depends essentially on 
the faithful performance of each duty as it comes ; the helpful and im- 
pressive sermons of the Rector at the Sunday morning services ; and 
Bishop Parker's inspiring sermon on All Saints' — Founders' Day — on 
"Service," the link that binds us to those who have gone before and 
those who shall come after — all have helped to strengthen the impress 
always made by the worship in the Chapel. 

The Altar Guild is doing its regular work under the general direction 
of "Miss Katie" and with Jennie Woodruff as President. Patsey 
Smith and Elizabeth Hughes are the Chapel Marshals, leading "the 
line" ; Lina Lockhart and Margaret Broadfoot are the Wardens ; and 
Bessie Peace and Florie Northrup are in charge of the books. Miss 
Luney is again the Organist and Choir Director, while Miss Crafts, 
Miss Hayward, Miss DeRosset and Miss Shull, with forty of the girls, 
make up the choir. 



The "Thursday TalRs " 



Probably the most important innovation of the session is the intro- 
duction of the "Thursday Talks." Instead of having prayers in the 
dining room after dinner on Wednesday evenings, this custom is trans- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 77 

ferred to Tuesday and Thursday evenings. The Literary Society meet- 
ings are held after prayers on Tuesdays instead of Wednesdays, and on 
Thursdays every one goes direct from the dining room to the school- 
room for the twenty-minute "Thursday Talk." 

The Rector has arranged to have these talks made from week to week 
by a number of men and women who have not only won success in their 
several lines of activity, but have shown themselves able to impart some 
of their enthusiasm and inspiration to their hearers. Some of the 
speakers will be from Raleigh and some from further away, while 
occasionally one of our own teachers may be expected to say a word. 

The period on Thursday, October 5th, was given up to the introduc- 
tory Student Meeting, and the talk on October 19th was omitted in 
deference to the feelings "of the fair after the Fair." On October 12th 
the Rector gave the first talk on "Ignorance and Knowledge," and on the 
26th it was our pleasure to hear Dr. Richard H. Lewis of Raleigh, the 
eye specialist, ex-president of the American Health Association, and 
member of the Executive Committee of the Trustees of St. Mary's, 
on "The Care of the Eye." 

The arrangement for November is as follows : 

November 2: Dr. Hubert Royster, the surgeon, ex-dean of the Raleigh divi- 
sion of the Medical Department of the University of North Carolina, ex-president 
of the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, etc., on "The Sin of Inaccuracy." 

November 9: Mr. R. D. W. Connor, Secretary of the State Historical Asso- 
ciation and of the Teachers' Assembly; author of Makers of North Carolina 
History, etc., on "Famous North Carolina Women." 

November 16: Miss Martha A. Dowd, Director of the Music Department, for 
thirty years student and teacher at St. Mary's, on "Economy." 

November 23: Mrs. Thos. P. Harrison, President of the Woman's Club of 
Raleigh. 

November 30 (Thanksgiving evening) : Dr. Howard E. Rondthaler, of Win- 
ston-Salem, President of Salem Academy and College. 

A report of these "Talks" may be expected in the December Muse. 



Bishop Parser's Visit 



A very pleasant feature of the fall life was the visit to the Rector of 
Rt. Rev. Edward N. Parker, D.D., the Bishop-coadjutor of New Hamp- 
shire, who was with us at the School from October 31st to November 



78 The St. Mary's Muse. 

7th. Bishop Parker and the Rector are old and dear friends, both hav- 
ing been for many years Masters in St. Paul's School, Concord, and 
taking a prominent part in the affairs of the Diocese of New Hampshire. 
Bishop Parker was called from St. Paul's to be Coadjutor to Bishop 
Niles in 1906, the year before Mr. Lay succeeded Mr. DuBose at St. 
Mary's. This is Bishop Parker's second visit to St. Mary's, as he spent 
some days at the Rectory four years ago and made the acquaintance 
of and became friends with many St. Mary's people then. After that 
visit he showed his interest in things here by establishing the Bishop 
Parker Botany Prize, which has been since awarded annually at Com- 
mencement. This year Bishop Parker was in Philadelphia in attend- 
ance at the consecration of his friend, the Rev. Philip Rhinelander, also 
an old St. Paul's boy, as Bishop-coadjutor of Pennsylvania, and came 
on down to North Carolina to see more of St. Mary's and to preach the 
Founders' Day sermon. 

Bishop Parker reached St. Mary's just before dinner on Hallowe'en, 
and was given an impressive welcome. He was introduced to the girls 
and teachers by the Rector in a neat little speech in which he reminded 
St. Mary's of his close relation to the visitor and invited all to receive 
him not as a stranger but as a friend. Bishop Parker responded fit- 
tingly, reminding the girls among other things that he was the repre- 
sentative of a younger sister of our St. Mary's, at Concord, and that he 
had been especially commissioned on his last visit by his girls there to 
bear their fraternal greetings to the St. Mary's girls in Raleigh. He 
said that he claimed all his girls at the New Hampshire St. Mary's as 
daughters, and while he could not claim quite as intimate a relation- 
ship with the girls of St. Mary's, Raleigh, he trusted that he might at 
least feel that he could adopt us all as cousins, using that term in the 
proper Southern application. His remarks were heartily received and 
the girls lived up to his and the Rector's suggestions throughout his 
visit, and, we hope, strengthened the good impression of things and 
people here that he has heretofore had. In the evening the Bishop 
attended the Hallowe'en celebration, which is strictly "in the family." 

On All Saints' — Founders' Day — Bishop Parker assisted the Rector 
in the Early Celebration; preached the special sermon at the eleven 
o'clock service ; addressed the students in the special exercises held 



The St. Mary's Muse. 79 

under the auspices of the Literary Societies in the Parlor after lunch ; 
and spoke to the Raleigh Chapter of the Alumnae at their Founders' Day 
Meeting in the Parlor at 5 :00 — quite a busy day even for a bishop. 

On Saturday evening, the 4th, he renewed his acquaintance with the 
characteristic gathering in the Parlor which all St. Mary's airls remem- 
ber so well — talked with the girls, and watched the dancing; inspected 
the Muse Boom, and was presented a St. Mary's banner ; and charmed 
everybody. The following morning, Sunday, in the absence of the 
Rector, who was in attendance at the consecration of the new St. Athan- 
asius Church, Burlington, he preached at the morning service and spoke 
brienv at the afternoon service. On Monday from 4:00 to 5:30, Mrs. 
Lay gave an informal reception to the Faculty in his honor ; and on 
Wednesday he left us for his Xew England home. 

Altogether the impressions of the Bishop's visit are most pleasant, 
and we hope that he may make many further visits to St. Mary's. A 
more full account of some of the Bishop's talks will appear in the next 
Muse. 



The Routine 



Ex-St. Mary's girls — "the recent alumna?" — "old St. Mary's girls" — 
or whatever those who have known and enjoyed the St. Mary's life in 
past sessions and are no longer with us prefer to be called (for ourselves, 
we like a old St. Mary's girls" best), always like to keep up with the 
little changes that occur from year to year in school routine, so perhaps 
this is a good time to chronicle a part of that routine in some detail that 
they may compare it with things in their time : 

School Days: 

Rising Bell 7:00 Physical Culture 3:30-4:30 

Breakfast 7:30 Dinner 6:00 

Mail 8:00 Chapel or Prayers 6:30 

Chapel 8:30 Mail 7:00 

Recitations 9 : 00-1 : 30 Study Hour 7 : 30-9 : 00 

Lunch 1:30 Lights Out 10:00 

Recitations 2 : 15-3 : 15 

Mondays: Free Day — Chapel immediately after breakfast. 



80 The St. Maky's Muse. 

Sundays: 

Rising Bell 7:30 Meditation Hour 3:00-4:00 

Breakfast 8:30 Evening Service 5:00 

Sunday Lesson 10 : 00 Supper 6:00 

Morning Service 11 : 00 Lights Out 9 : 30 

Dinner 1:00 

Regular Appointments : 

Tuesdays 7 : 30 — Literary Societies. 

Wednesdays 3 : 15 — Chorus. 

7:00— Sight Singing. 

Thursdays 6 : 40 — "Thursday Talks." 

7:00— Muse Club. 

8 : 00— Orchestra. 

Fridays 7 : 00— Choir. 

Saturdays 8 : 00-9 : 00 — Free evening. 

Sundays 7 : 00— Choir. 

(As appointed) — Chapters. 



With the Exchanges 



The Muse acknowledges with much pleasure the receipt of the follow- 
publi cations, and extends best wishes for a very prosperous year to each 
of them. Up to November there had come to hand Black and Gold of 
the Winston High School; the University of Utah Chronicle; The Col- 
lege of Charleston Magazine; Davidson College Magazine; The Deaf 
Carolinian of Morganton; The Emory and Henry Era; Gluck Auf of 
the Goldsboro High School; The Gray Boole of Cliff-Crest-on-the-Hud- 
son, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ; the Waynesville High School Echo; The 
Hollins Magazine; The Lenoirian of Lenoir College; the Durham High 
School Messenger; the Duval High School Oracle of Jacksonville, Ma. ; 
Park School Gazette of Durham; Red and White; The Tar Heel of 
University of North Carolina ; Tit Bits of St. Timothy's, Catonsville ; 
the Washington Collegian; The Wesleyan; Western Maryland College 
Monthly; and the Winthrop College Journal. 

From this list we miss some old friends from which we hope to hear 
before another month. The college publications of North Carolina 
depend for a large part of their strength on the University of North 
Carolina Magazine, Wake Forest Student, State Normal Magazine, and 



The St. Maky's Muse. 81 

The Acorn of Meredith College. They are all stimulating to those who 
read them outside their own institutions as well as to the members of 
their own institutions, and we like St. Mary's girls to see them. And 
there are a number of other publications we miss likewise. 

In the exchanges at hand this month we note much of interest, but 
wish to jot down just a little for the interest of readers of the Muse : 

The Oracle has a good custom of holding back its June number, which 
is the big number of the year, and mailing it to its exchanges promptly 
at the beginning of the new session. This plan might be followed with 
profit by others. The Oracle also has a Domestic Science Department, 
the first we have noted in a school publication. 

Hollins Magazine, which changed last year from a quarterly to a 
monthly and keeps up its excellent quality, preserves the Exchange 
Department of the old style but calls it "Blue Pencil," and Blue Pencil 
writes very well. If the critic's department in college magazines is to 
continue, this is an excellent way to handle it. 

At A. & M. this year the management of Red and White has passed 
from the Athletic Association to the Literary Societies, while the Ath- 
letic Association has a new publication in the weekly Wau-Gau-Rac. 
The first two issues of Red and White show a distinct improvement. 

Wesleyan furnishes a novelty of the good taste of which we are not 
sure. In the first number of the magazine for the year appear the 
individual photographs of the editors. Perhaps it is to introduce them 
to its readers, and certainly the fair faces speak well for Wesleyan, 
but we do not believe that too much stress on the editors is the best way 
to stress the magazine. 

The Winthrop College Journal might be taken by many of us as an 
example of the way to look. Its appearance is fine throughout and 
reflects much credit on its printers. May the quality of the contents 
always measure up to the style of the publication. 



82 The St. Mary's Muse. 



MEMORY RHYMES 



The Commandments 

1. Thou shalt have none other God but Me; 

2. Before no idol bow the knee. 

3. Take not the name of God in vain. 

4. Nor dare the Sabbath day profane. 

5. Give to thy parents honor due. 

6. Take heed that thou no murder do. 

7. Abstain from word or deed unclean. 

8. Nor steal, though thou art poor and mean. 

9. Make not a sinful lie nor love it. 
10. What is thy neighbor's do not covet. 



Bool^s of the Old Testament 

In Genesis the world was made 

By God's creative hand; 
In Exodus the Hebrews marched 

To gain the promised land. 
Leviticus contains the law, 

Holy and just and good; 
Numbers records the tribes enrolled, 

All sons of Abraham's blood. 
Moses, in Deuteronomy, 

Records God's mighty deeds; 
Brave Joshua into Canaan's land 

The hosts of Israel leads. 
In Judges their rebellion oft 

Provokes the Lord to smite; 
But Ruth records the faith of one 

Well pleasing in His sight. 
In First and Second Samuel 

Of Jesse's sons we read. 
Ten tribes in First and Second Kings 

Revolted from his seed. 
The First and Second Chronicles, 

See Judah captive made; 
But Ezra leads a remnant back 

By princely Cyrus' aid. 
The city walls of Zion 

Nehemiah builds again, 
Whilst Esther saves her people 

From the plots of wicked men. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 83 

In Job we read how faith will live 

Beneath affliction's rod, 
And David's Psalms are precious songs 

To every child of God. 
The Proverbs, like a goodly string 

Of choicest pearls appear. 
Ecclesiastes teaches man 

How vain are all things here. 
The mystic Song of Solomon 

Excels sweet Sharon's rose, 
Whilst Christ, the Saviour and the King, 

The rapt Isaiah shows. 
The warning Jeremiah 

Apostate Israel scorns, 
His plaintive Lamentations 

Their awful downfall mourns. 
Ezekiel tells in wondrous words 

Of dazzling mysteries, 
Whilst kings and empires yet to come 

Daniel in vision sees. 
Of judgment and of mercy 

Hosea loves to tell. 
Joel describes the blessed days 

When God with man shall dwell. 
Among Tekoa's herdsmen 

Amos received his call, 
Whilst Obadiah prophesies 

Of Edom's final fall. 
Jonah enshrines a wondrous type 

Of Christ our risen Lord. 
Micah pronounces Judah lost, 

Lost, but again restored. 
Nahum declares on Nineveh 

Just judgment shall be poured. 
A view of Chaldea's coming doom 

Habakkuk's visions give. 
Next Zephaniah warns the Jews 

To turn, repent, and live. 
Haggai wrote to those who saw 

The Temple built again, 
And Zachariah prophesied 

Of Christ's triumphant reign. 
Malachi was the last who touched 

The high prophetic chord; 
Its final notes sublimely show 

The coming of the Lord! — Selected. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

Sb. Mary's Alumnse Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

|"Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorart Vice-Presidents - •< Mrs. I. MeK. Pittenger. Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

President - Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem. 



EDITORIAL 



This Muse will reach its readers a fortnight after Founders' Day. 
No news has yet come to the School of the Founders' Day meetings of 
the alumnse in other places, but if they were as successful as that held 
by the Raleigh Chapter there were many satisfactory gatherings of the 
alumnse on the day. We hope that before another issue of The Muse 
is ready we will have reports of the meetings held and be able to give 
the news of them to the other Chapters. 

The special interest of the alumnae at this time should be centered on 
the trip of the Traveling Secretary, and we hope that she will be able 
to visit many of the Chapters and will everywhere find and impart en- 
thusiasm. 



The Traveling Secretary to the Alumnae 



Winston-Salem, K C, October 7, 1911. 
St. Mary's Alumnce: 

At a meeting of St. Mary's alumnae held at the School last Com- 
mencement, the honor of Traveling Secretary was conferred upon me. 

As for the work of this position, I wish to say that I am willing to do 
my part provided I have the co-operation of the Alumnae Association. 

By co-operation I mean this chiefly. When letters are sent to differ- 
ent towns, asking some one to collect the alumnae there, that you will 
respond by asking the alumnae to an informal tea where I, as a direct 
messenger from the School and one intimately associated with the work- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 85 

ings of the School, may meet the different alumna? and tell you how the 
School stands, what it needs, what you could do to help it, and answer 
any questions you may see fit to ask. In other words, this work of the 
Traveling Secretary's will bring you in close touch with the School. 

We need the sympathy and lenity of the alumna?, without which we 
shall lack force. 

In conclusion, I will say that I shall ask for no money. You will, 
however, save the Association some expense if one of your Chapter will 
be able to entertain the Secretary — even that is not necessary. 

Trusting in your interest and hoping to see a great many of you in 
November, Faithfully yours, 

AxNA 1ST. Buxtox, 
Traveling Secretary of the Alumnoe Association, 1911-12. 



The Government of the Alumnae 



In accordance with the Constitution adopted by the Alumna? Asso- 
ciation at the Commencement meeting in 1910, the general management 
of alumna? affairs is vested in an Alumna? Council, consisting of the four 
officers ex officio and six other alumna?, two elected each year for a term 
of three years. 

The President of the Association for the year ending at Commence- 
ment (May 27th), 1912, is Mrs. A. W. Knox (Eliza Smedes, '79), of 
Raleigh; the Vice-President, Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson (Annie Phil- 
lips, '84), of Richmond, Va. ; the Secretary, Miss Kate McKimmon, of 
St. Mary's; and the Treasurer, Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank (Margaret M. 
Jones, '96), of St. Mary's. Mrs. Cruikshank was appointed by the 
Council in October to succeed Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger (Lucy Garrett), 
of Raleigh, whose resignation was at that time regretfully accepted. 
The other members of the Council are Miss Mary F. Henderson, '03, of 
Salisbury; and Mrs. Albert L. Cox (Arabel Nash), Mrs. R. C. Strong 
(Daisy Horner, '90), Miss Annie G. Root, '03, Mrs. Win. E. Shipp 
(Margaret Busbee), and Miss Sarah Cheshire, all of Raleigh. The 
Council has authority to act for the Association in the period between 
the annual meetings. 



86 The St. Mart's Muse. 



The general Alumnae Association is intended to be a central body for 
cementing together the local bodies, the Chapters, and the growth and 
success of the Association depends very largely on the development and 
growth of these local Chapters. The Constitution authorizes the forma- 
tion of a Chapter in any locality where there are three or more resident 
alumnae, and enjoins no further responsibility on the Chapter than 
loyalty to the School ; the holding, if practicable, of two meetings each 
year, on or about Founders' Day, November 1st, and Alumnae Day, May 
12th; and the payment of a per capita dues of fifty cents. The Council 
aims to keep in touch with each Chapter through the Muse, by corres- 
pondence, and more especially by the visits of the Traveling Secretary, 
who is this year Miss Anna N. Buxton, of Winston-Salem. Miss Bux- 
ton tells of her purpose in the letter published above. 



The DuBose Memorial in Asheville 



The following letter will be of interest to a large number of alumnae, 
and the Rector of St. Mary's hopes that all those alumna? who knew Mr. 
DuBose, and the valuable work that he did at St. Mary's, will send their 
contributions, whether large or small, to the Secretary of the Society in 
Asheville in order to aid in the erection of this memorial to our late 

Rector : 

2 Charlotte St., Asheville, N. C, Oct. 30, 1911. 
Rev. G. W. Lay, Raleigh, N. C. 

Dear Sir: — The Rector's Aid Society of Trinity Church, Asheville, is, with 
the permission of the Vestry, raising funds for the purpose of erecting in our 
new church the altar which is to be a memorial to the late Rev. McNeely 
DuBose, for so many years the dearly loved Rector of this parish. 

Knowing that he was as greatly loved and highly honored at St. Mary's as 
he was here, we believe his many friends there would like to contribute to the 
beautiful memorial to a splendid Christian life. 

We would appreciate it if you would bring the matter to the notice of your 
School. Any funds sent us would be immediately added to the six hundred 
dollars we have in hand for the altar. 

Thanking you for your kindness, 

I am, cordially, (Mrs.) Mary L. Cheatham, 

Secretary "Rector's Aid." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 87 



Alumnae Weddings 



MiKell— Eldredge 

Mr. Frank William Eldredge 

requests the pleasure of your presence at the 

marriage of his daughter 

Margaret 

to 

Mr. Beverly Mikell 

on Wednesday evening the first of November 

at eight o'clock 

"Goodie Castle" 

Camden, South Carolina 



Harris — Crews 

Mrs. Walter J. Crews 

requests the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of her daughter 

Juliet Sutton 

to 

Mr. William Clinton Harris 

on Wednesday evening, November the eighth 

nineteen hundred and eleven 

at eight o'clock 

Christ Church 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Harney— Cape hart 

Mrs. William Rhodes Capehart 

requests the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of her daughter 

Clara Cotton 

to 

Mr. William Selby Harney 

on the morning of Wednesday the eighth of November 

at eleven o'clock 

at Avoca, North Carolina 



88 The St. Maky's Muse. 



Carr-Boylan 

Mrs. James Boylan 

requests the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of her daughter 

Margaret Jordan 

to 

Mr. Claihorn McDowell Carr 

on the evening of Wednesday the fifteenth of November 

nineteen hundred and eleven 

at nine o'clock 

Christ Church 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Reception immediately after ceremony, 753 Hillsboro Street. 



Whichard-Carroll 

Mrs. Owen Judson Carroll 

requests the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of her daughter 

Pattie Lawrence 

to 

Mr. Henry Walter Whichard 

on the afternoon of Wednesday the twenty-fifth of October 

at half after five o'clock 

at the Church of the Good Shepherd 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



READ !— MARK, !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 185S 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

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THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography', 



We may live without poetry, music and art; 
We may live without conscience, and live without heart; 
We may live without friends, we may live without fads, 
But The Muse to be sure can not live without ADS! 



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I met a goat and said to him, 
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Quoth he, "Because I chews." 



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OYSTE RS 

DAILY 
Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St. Both Phones 356 


J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 






ROBERT SIMPSON 

DRUGGIST AND PRESCRIPTIONIST 


H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 

For Toilet Requisites and 
Colds Drinks 


GOOD THINGS ALWAYS AT 


BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 


EAT 
BETTS' ICE CREAM 


RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the onlv perfect heater 

maae. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Fayetteville St. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRLG STORE 



AND SODA FOUNTAIN 



Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, 
Secretary. 



R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



Thinly it Over 

If Johnny Jones has seven dogs 

And every dog is white; 
And fourteen cats came chasing 'round, 

Each one as black as night; 
Each two cats have eighteen lives 

Less three destroyed by rats, 
How many lives must three dogs take 

Before they kill eight cats? 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 

Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



1 ROSENTHAL 
XCO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING NOTHING 
EXCEEDS THE 

GAS RANGE 

Always Ready. No Dirt. No Ashes 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Weisbach, "The Light th&t Does 
Not Flicker." 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO, 

8 West Martin Street. 



Advertisements. 



DARNELL &. THOMAS 
Music House 

Established 1887 

Pianos, Organs, Small Instruments, Sheet 
Music and Instruction Books 



Raleig\h. 



North Carolina 



MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 
OF RAI.EJGH, N. C. 

Capital 8100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

4®* Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 



:dward3 
(broughtc 



W/PRLSTLNG *COAW 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 

Both Phones: | Hfi 



THE HOTEL RALEIGH 

INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 



"Why is it you call money dough.?" 
Asked a fair maiden of her beau; 

And grinning wide 

The youth replied, 
"Because I knead it so." 



K I NG' S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO. 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

INSURANCE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 
THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 
Fayetteville Street 



SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 

YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. J. T PULLEN, 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson 



F. H. Briggs 



PRESIDENT CASHIER 

THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round steps bank" since 186.5 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly &- Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

DR. F. D. CASTLEBURY 



AYCOCK & WINSTON 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW RALEIGH, N. C. 

JOHN C. DREVYRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

Dr. D. E. EVERETT 

dentist 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
millinery 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY-GROCERIES 

BE8T OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

22 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 
Garments at our store because we sell better goods 
for loss money 

THE FASHION 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

Why is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular? 
ASK THE GIRLS 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



C. E. HARTGE— ARCHITECT 



RALEIGH, N. C 



MRS. FRANK REDFORD-MILLINERY 

13 West Hargett St. Phone 632 

10% off to Faculty and Boarding Pupils 

SHOES 

12 East Martin Street 
PEEBLES & EDWARDS 

DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON 

DENTIST 

116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 



BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Books and Stationery 

113 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

GREEN & WATSON 

Art Store 

11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 

Phone 953-R 

21 714 Fayetteville Street 



N. H. MOORE 

Repairer of Fine Shoes 

Fayetteville Street 



MISS SMITH 

DRESSMAKER 

Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing promptly done 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store. 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Stf., Washington, D. C, Is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparlng 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



St. Mary's Calendar, 1911 



September 21, Thursday. 



9:00. 



October 


5, 


Thursday, 


6:45. 


October 


6, 


Friday, 


4:30. 


October 


7, 


Saturday, 


8:00. 


October 


9, 


Monday, 


8:30. 



October 12, Thursday, 



October 14, Saturday, 



October 17, Tuesday,* 



October 18, Wednesday, 

*12:30-5:00 



October 21, Saturday, 



October 26, Thursday, 



November 1, Wednesday. 



November 



4:30 
1, Wednesday,* 8:30, 



September-December, 1911. 

70th Session opened at 9:00 a. m. 

Brief Service in the Chapel. Opening re- 
marks by Bishop Cheshire. 

Student Mass Meeting in the Schoolroom. 

Reception to the Seniors at the Rectory. 

Mr. Karl Jansen, Impersonator and Reader, in 
St. Mary's Auditorium. 

First Faculty Recital. Miss Crafts, Violinist, 
assisted by Miss Luney, Pianist. 

Thursday Talk. The Rector, on Ignorance 
and Knowledge. 

Annual Reception of the Epsilon Alpha Pi 
Literary Society to its new members in the 
Parlor. 

Opening of the Raleigh Auditorium. Speeches 
by Governor Harmon and others. 

State Fair Day. Holiday. 

Visit to the State Fair. 

Annual Reception of the Sigma Lambda Lit- 
erary Society to its new members. 

Thursday Talk. Dr. R. H. Lewis on The Care 
of the Eye. 

Founders' Day; All Saints'; Holy day. 

All Saints' Service; sermon by Bishop Parker 
of New Hampshire. 

Student exercises, under the auspices of the 
Literary Societies, in the Parlor. 

Raleigh Chapter of the Alumnae in the Parlor. 

Thomas Jefferson in Rip Van Winkle at the 
Academy of Music. 



6:45. 



8:00. 



8:30. 



8:30. 



6:45. 



11:00. 



1:45. 



November 2, Thursday, 6:45. 



November 3, Friday,* 
November 9, Thursday, 



November 11, Saturday,* 

November 13, Monday, 

November 16, Thursday, 

November 18, Saturday, 
November 23, Thursday, 



November 30, Thursday. 



December 2, Saturday, 
December 7, Thursday, 

December 9, Saturday, 
December 11, Monday, 



8:30. 
6:45. 



3:30. 

8:30. 

6:45. 

8:00. 
6:45. 

8:30. 



November 27, Monday,* 8:30. 



11:00. 
6:45. 

8:15. 
8:30. 

8:30. 
8:30. 



December 14, Thursday, 8:00. 

December 15, Friday. 
January 3, Wednesday. 



Thursday Talk. Dr. Hubert Royster on The 
Sin of Inaccuracy. 

Marine Band in the Raleigh Auditorium. 

Thursday Talk. Mr. R. D. W. Connor, Secre- 
tary of the State Historical Ccmmission, on 
Some Famous Women of North Carolina. 

A. & M.-Washington and Lee football game at 
A. & M. grounds. 

Second Faculty Recital, in the St. Mary's 
Auditorium. 

Thursday Talk. Miss Dowd, Director of the 
Music Department. 

St. Catherine's Chapter. 

Thursday Talk. Mrs. T. P. Harrison, Presi- 
dent of the Woman's Club of Raleigh. 

First Peace-St. Mary's Concert, series of 1911- 
'12, in the Auditorium. Miss Louise Barn- 
holt, Contralto. 

Meeting of the N. C. State Literary and His- 
torical Association in the Raleigh .audito- 
rium. Speakers: Prof. C. Alphonso Smith 
and Prof. E. K. Graham. 

Thanksgiving Day. St. Andrew's Day. Holiday. 

Thanksgiving Service. 

Thursday Talk. President Howard E. Rond- 
thaler of Salem Academy and College. 

The Dramatic Club in Pantomime. 

Third Faculty Recital. Miss Luney, Organist, 
in the Chapel. 

The Dramatic Club in St. Mary's Auditorium. 

Glee Club of the University of North Carolina 
in St. Mary's Auditorium. 

Pre-Christmas Entertainment under the aus- 
pices of the Muse Club. 

Christmas Recess begins at 3:15. 

School Duties resumed at 7:00 p. m. 



(The functions marked with a star (*) are held outside the School, but are 
open to those of the student body who care to attend.) 









Location Central for the Carolina*. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary's School, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



{for girls and young women) 



70th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1911. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1912. 



St. Mary's 

offers instruction in these 
Department* : 



\ 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 
h. THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1911-12 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 



Rev. George W. Lay, 



Rector. 






Zt>t 



£>t. Jtlarp'a jWuae 



©Member, 1911 



JfaU Jjtam&er 



fcaletgf), 3i C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



FALL NUMBER. 



Vol. XVI. December, 1911. No. 4 



The Origin of Thansgiving Day 



Caroline Jones. 



The Pilgrims, fond as they were of social enjoyment, during their 
first winter, knew no day of rest except the sacred day of worship. 
But in 1621, (the year after their landing from the Mayflower); as 
the summer had passed and the harvest had ended, they determined to 
have a period of recreation, combined with thanksgiving, for their 
many mercies. The Governor therefore sent out four huntsmen, who 
in one day secured enough game to supply the Colony for nearly a 
week. They invited Massasoit to attend this feast and he accepted 
and brought with him ninety people. The guests remained three days, 
during which time they captured five deer to add to the larder of their 
hosts, and also brought with them some roast dogs, which they con- 
sidered a great delicacy. The motley company indulged in a round of 
amusements and the Colonists entertained their visitors with military 
tactics and evolutions. Without doubt, religious services opened each 
day, for the Pilgrims were cheerful Christians, who carried religion 
into all their affairs. Thus heartily and regally was inaugurated the 
great New England festival of Thanksgiving. For two centuries it 
continued to be a peculiarity of the Eastern States ; but it has now 
become national, its annual return finding a welcome along the Lake 
shore and the Gulf, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 



90 The St. Mary's Muse. 



An Eccentric Character 



Mary Hancock Owen. 



He was the most eccentric person I have ever known ; the first time 
I saw him he was standing in our sitting-room door, his saddle bags 
thrown over one shoulder, his white cloth hat pulled over his eyes, his 
khaki riding togs and leggings sadly mud-bespattered. And this was 
the abrupt manner of his appearance and the strangeness of his atti- 
tude. At the sight of my mother, he jerked off his remarkable hat and 
introduced himself as Robert Berket, in tones which labeled him 
English. That was the beginning of our acquaintance, but not the end, 
for Mr. Berket stayed with us from that day on for two years. He 
never did a stroke of work, he never mentioned his home or his family 
or how he came to travel or where he had traveled before. 

He always wore a khaki suit and leggings except at dinner, when he 
changed into a white drill suit and leggings. Leggings at dinner! 
White leggings and shoes. That was our first great shock. Our next 
was when he appeared with his wonderful golden hair cropped off. 

"Mr. Berket!" we exclaimed. 

"Aw — it was too pretty for a man, don't you know," he answered. 

I found him in the kitchen one day borrowing a frying pan from 
the cook. That evening he said : 

"Aw — Mrs. Blank, I tried eating polliwigs today." 

"Really," said mother, by this time not to be taken by surprise, 
"how did you like them ?" 

"They were rather er — er — gritty." 

Two of his eccentricities bothered me not a little. At night when 
all were in bed he would walk up and down the porch and recite Shake- 
speare and the Rubaiyat. "To be or not to be ; that is the question" — 
he would repeat over and over. And I would wonder, "To be what or 
not to be what" ? Then, he would insist upon riding in the pouring 
rain coatless and hatless and I would think now he is going "not to 
be" and I won't see him. 

Mr. Berket was always chary of displaying his talents. After a good 
deal of work and trouble he published a very creditable grammar of the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 91 

Kexi, the Indian dialect of the place. The first copies were no sooner 
out than he had them recalled. We never found out why. My mother 
had a very beautiful picture of Mignon which she wished Mr. Berket 
as a connoisseur to criticize. 

"I should say," he drawled after long deliberation, "I should say she 
was dressed in rags." 

He rode away at the end of two years and spent six months with our 
neighbor, Signor Rossie. Signor Rossie's household, however, did not 
seem to please him, for he came back and is still living on our place. 



Autumn 



Patsey Harry Smith. 



If I were only endowed with the power, to me miraculous, of writing 
poetry, I should burden the world with endless odes, sonnets, and odd 
verses of all kinds dedicated to — Autumn. Perhaps the very fact that 
I choose Autumn in preference to Spring is proof positive that I have 
no poetry in my soul, for poets have ever written of 

Spring, sweet Spring, the year's pleasant king, 
When the attic warbler pours her throat, 
Responsive to the cuckoo's note 
The untaught harmony of Spring. 

It is true that Thomas in his Seasons devotes one portion of his 
poem to Autumn ; yet the most striking feature in His Autumn is "The 
Storm in Harvest," which surely sets forth, not one of the superior 
characteristics, but one of the defects of the most perfected part of 
the year. I say most perfected because never have I been able to think 
of Autumn as the "Fall" of the year, when 

the leaves, dead, 
Are driven like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing, 
Yellow and black, and pale and hectic red, 
Pestilence-stricken multitudes! 

The very word Autumn suggests to my mind a "season of mists and 
mellow fruitfulness, close-bosom friend of the maturing sun," when 



92 The St. Mary's Muse. 



nature with her "red-lipped fruitage/' harvest sheaves, rich stored 
granaries and flamboyant splendors of hill and plain seems to have 
reached the very zenith of her glory. 

Spring, the season of blossoming, reawakening, rebirths, with its 
freshness and soft beauties is wonderful indeed, and makes an appeal 
to the fancy so subtle and delicate as to be altogether indefinable; but 
in considering Autumn, the English language in its entirety seems 
inadequate to describe the mellow loveliness, glowing coloring, rich ma- 
turity and characteristic vividness of the season's sumptuous bounty. 
If there is any one particular poet who seems to have been qualified to 
write of Autumn, it is Keats. The brevity of his Ode to Autumn is 
the poem's only imperfection, for had he written three times three as 
many verses the well chosen subject would not be exhausted and there 
would still be a great deal left unmentioned. Keats, with his wonder- 
ful ability for creating images that glow with light and color, had the 
further power of weaving atmospheres around his created images, but I 
do not believe that even Keats would have been able successfully to 
convey to the minds of readers anything like a definite idea of the 
impression made upon one when in an Autumnal forest. Nor is it 
strange or to be wondered at that pen has never been able to describe 
such an impression. You feel rather than hear the "noiseless noise" 
of the falling pine needles, and the eye is unable fully to take in and 
appreciate the varying lights, shades, golden browns and reds, purples, 
scarlets and blended greens of foliage of such wondrous coloring that 
no painter has ever yet been able to portray it. 

I think the Autumn roses have a fragrance superior to that of the 
flowers of Spring and Summer, and the goldenrod which becomes so 
abundant is especially indicative of the season's character. Along with 
the goldenrod and later flowers Autumn brings the Harvest, Hallowe'en 
and Thanksgiving: All Hallowe'en with its yellow pumpkin jack-o- 
lanterns, rosy apples, nuts, and "hazel shells" that have been "plumped 
with sweet kernels" ; and Thanksgiving with its abundance of Har- 
vest's fruitage. 

When to think of Autumn is to call to mind the abundance of nature's 
productiveness, maturity, and ripened beauty, how is it possible to con- 
nect with it the ideas of gloom and sadness, as if by it the season's 



The St. Mary's Muse. 93 

death knell had been sounded ? When the leaves are all colorless and 
dead and the trees stark and bare; when at early morning there is a 
chill bitterness in the air and at nightfall a sombre greyness over the 
earth, it is no longer Autumn ; Winter, "dread deity" and "power of 
desolation" with its ice and snows is upon the world. 



The Chronicle of a Thanksgiving Turkey 



Elizabeth Atkinson Lay. 



I am the finest, fattest turkey in the whole barnyard. Everybody 
says so. W T hy, the lady whom I belong to, spoke of me the other day 
as the largest turkey she'd ever seen. I am not alone in this large 
yard, for there are several of my kinsmen here, but they spend all their 
time trying to get thin. A very silly way to spend your time — dis- 
agreeable, too, and yet it seems to be a great fad, for the two girls who 
have come from boarding school to spend Thanksgiving in that white 
house over there were looking at me the other day, and one of them 
said, "My, but I am glad I'm not as fat as that turkey. Don't you 
really think, Bess, that I am decently thin now ?" The other one, who 
was rather short, dumpy, and plump to say the least, answered in quite 
a snappish manner, "There are worse things than being fat, and as 
for that turkey, you'll be glad enough to see him on the dinner table 
Thanksgiving!" This last quite aroused my interest. Aha! I thought, 
so I am to be invited to dine with them, and am to be indeed given, 
for my very stoutness, the seat of honor. I shall sit upon the table. 
Well, it would have to be a pretty large table to hold me, I surmised, 
all the while proudly preening my feathers, and strutting around in the 
sun's rays at a great rate. 

A week has passed, and I have hardly strength enough to write this 
poor chronicle. I am the thinnest turkey in the barnyard. Everybody 
says so. But my thinness is of small moment to the weight of sorrow 
that bows me down. iSTot once have I made a fan of mv beautiful tail 

t/ 

feathers, and strutted in the sunlight. No, riot I. What is the sun — 

what is life — mortals eat turkeys on Thanksgiving! Ah, well I re- 
2 



94 The St. Mary's Muse. 

member now how my mother told me to fear all human beings and, 
above all, to get thin near Thanksgiving. Why do you know I just 
escaped being served upon the table Thanksgiving in the very house 
with whose inmates I understood I was to have dined. Yes, the little 
short girl who was plump, to say the least, alone saved me from such a 
fate. She says I am her Turkey and would not let me be killed. She 
has gone away now and so I have to keep thin to keep my life. Ah, 
where is the joy I once found in turkeydom, where are my jaunty, 
mincing steps of other days ? All, all are gone ! I, ye turkeys that 
follow me and for whom I write, take warning — know that vanity is 
one of the greatest of all evils and that pride surely cometh before a fall. 



All Saints' Day at St. Mary's 



Margaret Strange Broadfoot. 



"Hm , 7 :30 ! Another half-hour to sleep, thank fortune." And 

suiting the action to the word, the slumberer turns over, and knows 
practically nothing more until breakfast time. For one's early morn- 
ing thoughts are, if not vague and indefinite, at least anything but keen. 

What a strange mixture of the week today seems ; this holy day, of 
All Saints. Half the subdued quiet of Sunday, and yet the drowsy, 
day-after-a-frolic feeling still lingers in the air. 

Last night was Hallowe'en and in proof of this, girls in gay attire 
flock out into the Autumn sunshine in merry groups ; and laughing, 
chattering, and swinging kodaks, gather to have their pictures taken; 
paper dolls, witches, Indians, cadets, ghosts, stately ladies and gentle- 
men, all mingle together. Other girls are seen strolling idly around 
the grove, enjoying the nothing-is-hanging-over-me feeling of a holiday. 
Still others are seen hurrying busily back and forth from chapel, filling 
vases, or looking for "Miss Katie" to ask directions of her; plainly 
bespeaking the Altar Guild. 

Then the bell rings for the eleven o'clock service, and the girls 
assemble, form, and march toward the chapel. They pass the covered- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 95 

way, and the notes of the organ swell out on the air; the choir takes 
up the words of the hymn and gradually down to the end of the line 
girl after girl joins in the triumphant song: 

Hark, the sound of holy voices, 

Chanting at the crystal sea, 
Alleluia, alleluia, 

Alleluia, Lord, to Thee: 
Multitude which none can number, 

Like the stars in glory stands, 
Clothed in white apparel, holding 

Palms of victory in their hands. 

The last girl has passed on, over the threshold of the chapel and into 
the holy quiet within. 

The crown over the altar and the lighted candles burn with a white 
light ; the bunches of chrysanthemums filling the chancel form soft 
masses of color ; and now the silence and stillness grows in intensity, 
until it seems as if the solemn hush pervading the chapel could be felt, 
by a congregation made one, by the words of the Bishop: "I believe 
in the communion of saints" — 

At length the organ sounds the recessional and one by one the chapel 
is deserted, and the music fades until the words : 

Oh, blest communion, fellowship divine, 
We feebly struggle, they in glory shine; 
Yet all are one in Thee, for all are Thine. 

Alleluia! 

drift and linger, then die away at last, and are succeeded by quiet for a 
minute, but only for a minute, for a jolly babel breaks out as soon as 
the girls pass the silence bounds. 

Assembly over, they disperse into groups, wander out on the grass 
and fall into a discussion of last night's events. Snatches of sentences 
are caught by the passer-by: "Didn't she look simply dear?" and "I 
never would have known who she was" ; "Oh how funny, I knew her 
voice right away !" Well, I had the time of my life bobbing for apples, 
but it certainly was disastrous to my water-color complexion." "Surely, 
bun, you don't indulge — " The ringing of the lunch bell just then 
proves an interruption as well as a welcome sound. 



96 The St. Mary's Muse. 

After lunch a joint meeting of the 2 A and E A P Literary Societies 
commemorates Founders' day ; and after the program is over, as the 
afternoon is a cloudy one, it suggests to a luxurious few kimonos, the 
last magazine, mayonnaise on crackers, made by two or three cooks, 
but not spoilt like the proverbial broth, while other energetic girls may 
be found with either enough surplus enthusiasm or courage of their 
convictions to do their social duties in the way of formal calls. Some 
with athletic ambitions even brave the chill and snappiness of the air 
for a game of tennis. And those in their rooms either "Beg your par- 
don for not writing sooner" or "Promise faithfully never to be so 
mean again." 

At any rate, all unite in a groan when the bell clangs at night for 
evening study-hall, and they know that All Saints' Day has passed. 



The Tide 



Patsey Harry Smith. 



I love the pale dawn on the slow ebbing tide, 
I love the low moan as the weary waters chide; 
And the grey-green swells into faint rosiness dyed 
As the day bursts forth on the slow-ebbing tide. 

I love the shining ripples of the incoming tide; 
I love to see the boats as the tiny waves ride 
And the sun's bright beams iridescently glide 
O'er the softly lapping waters of the incoming tide. 

I love the full moon on the full risen tide, 
With the heavens reflected in their glory and pride. 
And the moonbeams aslant on an anchored ship's side, 
Making phosphorescent lights on the full-risen tide. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 97 



SCHOOL NEWS 



SUSAN PORTER RAWLINGS, Editor. 



Dr. Lewis' TolK 

Thursday evening, October 26th, Dr. Richard H. Lewis, a member 
of the Board of Trustees, spoke to us, in the schoolroom, about the 
treatment of the eye. Dr. Lewis described the delicate mechanism 
of the eye and gave, as the chief means of protecting the eye, the im- 
portance of not straining it in any way. It was good advice and we 

hope to profit by it. 

Mr. Connor's TalK 

Thursday evening, November 9th, Mr. R. D. W. Connor, one of the 
State's leading educators, talked to us in the schoolroom about leading 
women in the history of the State. He mentioned the ladies of the 
Edenton Tea Party ; Mary Slocomb, the heroine at Moore's Creek 
Bridge ; Mrs. Elizabeth Steele, a Fayetteville woman, prominent in the 
Revolutionary War ; and also Margaret Gaston, Dorothea Dix, and 
Mrs. Spenser. Mrs. Spenser has done a large work in the State, help- 
ing the University and the State Normal. We all enjoyed Mr. Con- 
nor's talk very much ; and were thoroughly interested in hearing about 

our famous women. 

Dr. Royster's TalK 

Thursday evening, November 2d, Dr. Hubert Royster made a short 
talk, in the schoolroom, upon "The Sins of Inaccuracy." This was a 
well chosen subject for most of us ; and we listened with interest to 
Dr. Royster's points. We expect this talk to be of great benefit to us ; 
and help us all to be free from "The Sins of Inaccuracy." 

Bishop Partner's Visit 

Tuesday, October 31st, the Rt. Rev. Edwin Parker, 73ishop Co- 
adjutor of New Hampshire and an "old friend and teacher" of Mr. 
Lay, came down to visit him. Bishop Parker was present at the Hal- 
lowe'en festivities ; he delivered the sermon All Saints' Day ; made a 
short talk, about the value of school songs, at the Founders' Day Inter- 



98 The St. Maky's Muse. 

Society meeting; and held services on Saturday of that week and Sun- 
day and Monday of the next, while Mr. Lay was away at the Convo- 
cation at Burlington. The Bishop remained at the Rectory until the 
9th. Mr. Lay invited the Seniors to meet him at different meals; and 
almost all of the girls met him at one time or another. His visit was 
indeed a very great pleasure to the whole school, and we sincerely hope 
that it will not be long before he comes again. 

The Hollowe'en Party 

The Hallowe'en Party, one of the great events of St. Mary's, was 
held on Tuesday night, October 31st. At seven-thirty a jolly crowd, 
in fantastic costumes, assembled in the schoolroom for the grand march. 
The merry throng then proceeded to the parlor, which was decorated in 
autumn leaves and jack-o-lanterns, suggestive of the season. The cos- 
tumes were fine, but were too numerous to be described. A few, that 
were especially good, must be mentioned, however; the "St. Mary's 
Pennant," "the Suffragettes," "the Gold Dust Twins," and the 
"Colonial Couple." After a very hilarious grand march, the party left 
the parlor for the attractions downstairs. The "Old Dining Room," 
lighted by jack-o-lanterns and electric bulbs, shaded with green, red 
and orange, produced a wierd and truly Hallowe'en-like effect. Every 
one had a thrilling time bobbing for apples in tubs of water, and biting 
for them on swinging strings. Then the mysteries of the future were 
foretold by a bejeweled fortune teller, and "the mystic wheel of for- 
tune," sealing the fate of those who entered the magic booth, was pre- 
sided over by two ghosts. The refreshments, consisting of plenteous 
quantities of apples, candies, and nuts, added greatly to the enjoyment 
of the occasion. 

The Music Faculty Concert 

Monday evening, November 13th, a concert was given in the Audito- 
rium by the Music Faculty. It was a delightful concert and, in addi- 
tion to hearing the members of the Faculty, whom we have heard 
before and always enjoy, we had the pleasure of hearing Miss DeRosset 
for the first time. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 90 



The charming program is given below 



1. Etude Op. 41 Prudent 

Miss Martha A. Dowd. 

2. (a) A l'Inconnue Chaminade 

( b) Berceuse Chaminade 

Miss Zona Shull. 

3. A Reverie Struoe 

Miss Blanche L. Crafts. 

4. A la bien Aimee Schiitt 

Miss Lina De Rosset. 

5. Tarantelle, Op. 27, No. 2 Moszkowski 

Miss Ella Dorroh. 

6. Concert Waltz Song Luders 

Miss Zona Shull. 

7. Fantasie-Impromptu, Op. 66 Chopin 

Miss Hermine R. Scheper. 

8. Spanish Dance (Habanera), Op. 21 Sarasate 

Miss Blanche L. Crafts. 
Miss Bertha M. Luney, Mr. R. Blinn Owen, Accompanists. 

The News and Observer reported the concert as follows : 

The concert by the Musical Faculty of St. Mary's School, given last Monday 
evening, was a brilliant success. The program was an interesting one, and each 
number was well rendered, receiving hearty applause. 

Miss Ella Dorroh, whose certificate recital of 1910, and diploma recital of May, 
1911, are remembered with pleasure by all who heard them, made her first ap- 
pearance in concert as a member of the faculty. The promise of her student 
days was more than fulfilled, for her rendering of the Moszkowski Tarantelle, 
Op. 27, No. 2, showed with no loss of brilliant tecnique a distinct gain in musical 
interpretation and poise. 

Miss Lina DeRosset gave the Schiitt "A la bien Aimee" with a style and confi- 
dence which make one look forward to her own recital in January. 

Miss Zona Shull also appeared for the first time as a member of the Music 
Faculty, winning success and hearty applause by her interpretation of two 
exquisite Chaminade songs, "A l'Inconnue" and "Berceuse," and a brilliant 
"Waltz Song" by Luders. 

Miss Scheper, Miss Crafts and Miss Dowd acquitted themselves as usual with 
credit to the department and added greatly to the interest of the program. Miss 
Luney and Mr. Owen as accompanists were at their best. 

The next in the series of faculty concerts will be an "Organ Recital," by Miss 
Luney, after which will be an evening of Liszt music, complimentary to the cen- 
tenary of the great virtuoso — this will be under the direction of Mr. R. Blinn 
Owen. 

In January Miss DeRosset will give a piano recital, and later in the school 
year there will be an evening with American composers, by the Music Faculty. 
The public is cordially invited to the series. 



100 The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



Bessie Peace was called home on account of the illness of her grand- 
father. We hope that he will soon be well enough for her to return. 

We will be very sorry to lose Kathleen Moses and Ria Alston, who 
are going home. Kathleen's father has been stationed at an army post 
in Maine, and this necessitates her leaving us. 

Elizabeth Leary, a last year's girl, spent a day and night at the 
School during the month. 

Mary Belle Stevenson enjoyed a short visit from her mother. 

Jeannette Bruce enjoyed having with her a friend from Portsmouth. 

Marguerite Gugner spent a few days at the School. 

Marguerite Springs, an "old girl" from Charlotte, spent a few hours 
at the School on the 11th. 



In Lighter Vein 



Caroline Ashe Lockhaet. 



The Best Medium 

An "ad" upon some lonely rock 

May business boost, 
Set forth where crows delight to flock 

Or herons roost. 

Such enterprise is well for those 

Who would supply 
A line of merchandise that crows 

Or weasels buy. 

But if you're catering to man, 

We must confess, 
No medium is better than 

The Muse's press. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 101 



•psaq aaq uo puBjs 0} pBq aqs ji 

'Aioqaraos 51 }b }o§ s.aqs mouji i 
— PB8J ^pB9J[B s,9q3 8i2uiC siqx 

'^U8D 8U0 ;Stlf 0^ JBHOp B J9§BM. [|J M0.N 

•A\.oqs b jo }tq jsb8{ aqj sjaS aqs ji 
'Aioqaraos mo pug n.aqs jaq i ma 
lAiou^ oj mu jqSno aqs §uiq;auios s.n 

IJlS B S8IJJ0AV }Bq} §UiqjXUB S.ajaq} ji 



Good girls love their brothers; 

So good have I grown, 
That I love other girls' brothers 

Better than my own. — Ex. 



They tell how fast the arrow sped 
When William shot the apple; 

But who can calculate the speed 
Of her who's late for chapel? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription. One Year = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies = a = a s Fifteen Cents. 

A Magizine published monthly except iu July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the Interest of the students and Alurms, undsr the editoriil management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1911-1912. 

Patsey Harry Smith, Editor-in-Chief. 
Nellie Hendricks, Mary Hancock Owen, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart, Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Evelyn Cameron Maxwell, Susan Porter Rawlings. 

Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon, Business Manager. 
Caroline Clarke Jones, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIALS 



Smile! Why Not ? 



There is a very old song which begins: "Old Grumbler is dead 
and laid in his grave, 0, Hio, Hio !" I have no doubt that the death 
of one meriting the name of "Old Grumbler" was reason enough for 
giving utterance to the joyful expression of "O, Hio," but what ade- 
quate manifestation of satisfaction could we make if with him "Old 
Grumbler" had taken into his grave all the grumblings current every- 
where ! The very word "grumble" has a disagreeable sound, but one 
who forever grumbles is far more disagreeable than even "Grumbler" 
could possibly suggest. 

When you come to think about it, does grumbling really better mat- 
ters ? Doesn't it rather enlarge the importance of either the real or 
the supposed grievance ? There is a great difference between grumbling 
and stating a complaint. If you really have a complaint you will make 
it known, or rather, you should make it known to that person whose 
duty it is to see that the cause of displeasure be removed as far as pos- 
sible. One gains nothing by promiscuously grumbling to all with 
whom we come in contact, regardless of the other person's connection 



The St. Mary's Muse. 103 

with your alleged grievance. Grumbling is a habit easily acquired and 
dangerously contagious ; he who grumbles, as a rule, grumbles at all 
things indiscriminately, and when grumbling about the work of others 
never once asks the question, "Could I perform the same work better ?" 
Therefore, all things considered, why grumble ? Why not exchange 
grumbles for smiles — smiles are much more becoming as regards one's 
self and far more pleasing from the standpoint of others. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

Sfc Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

( Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - < Mrs. I. McK. Pittonger. Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

President .... Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh. 

Vice-President ... - Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem. 



EDITORIAL 



As has been announced in previous issues of the Muse, it is the hope 
of the Alumnae Association that the various chapters "hold if practi- 
cable two meetings each year, on or about Founders' Day, November 
first, and Alumna? Day, May twelfth." The Muse has also asked that 
reports of these meetings be sent in as early as possible. At present we 
are able to report only two of these meetings: one at Chapel Hill and 
one at Raleigh. The Chapel Hill Chapter met on All Saints' Day and 
reported six active members, Mrs. George McGehee, Mrs. J. L. Holmes, 
Miss Mary Manning, Mrs. Collier Cobb, and Misses Louise and Cantey 
Venable. The Treasurer, Miss Louise Venable, sent with her report 
$6 to go into the general Alumnae fund. 

The Raleigh Chapter held its meeting at St. Mary's on November 
first with about thirty members present. The meeting was an interest- 
ing one. The President, Miss Annie Root, announced her plan of 
raising funds for the Alumnse by means of a play given some time after 
Christmas. Her idea is to give a play of Bernard Shaw, which will be 
preceded by a short talk on Shaw's work by Mr. Archibald Henderson. 
The plan was heartily approved by those present and Miss Root intends 
to begin at once to get things under way. Mrs. Watkins Robards gave 
an interesting talk, suggesting the aims and needs of the Alumnse Chap- 
ters. At the close of the business meeting Bishop Parker, of New 



The St. Mary's Muse. 105 

Hampshire, addressed the meeting, speaking of the work of the Alumnae 
body in his own school of St. Mary's in New Hampshire. A short 
service in the Chapel followed, which gave a feeling of added inspira- 
tion and of closer fellowship to the bonds that hold the members 
together. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Cordon — London 

The following invitation has been issued to friends of the contract- 
ing parties: 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Armand London 

invite you to be present 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Bettie Louise 

to 

Mr. James Henry Cordon 

on the evening of Thursday the seventh of December 

nineteen hundred and eleven 

at half after eight o'clock 

St. Bartholomew's Church, Pittsboro, N. C. 



Boiley-Loane 

On the 25th of October Miss Katie Loane and Mr. I. B. Bailey were 
married at Grace Episcopal Church in Plymouth, N". C. 

Miss Loane was at St. Mary's in 1912. The Muse extends to her 
the sincerest wishes for her happiness. 



READ !— M ARK !— ACT ! 



The Elitors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



' It's worth the difference" 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography" 



"Are men as black," she queried, 
"As they are painted, do you think?" 

In Yankee style I answered her, 
"Are girls," I said, "as pink?" 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE CO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery 
Tailored Costumes 
Gloves, Hosiery 
Handkerchiefs 
Fancy Goods 
Underwear 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly 



FAYETTEVII/LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Herbert Rosenthal 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 


LADIES' FINE SHOES 


131 Favetteville Street, 




Raleigh, N. C. 


INSURE IN THE 

Jefferson Standard Life Ins. Go. 

RALEIGH, N, C. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 


COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 


Strongest in the South 


122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINNA CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 

CANDY CHINA — TOYS 

PICTURES STATIONERY 



Here's to the girl that gets a kiss 
And runs to tell her mother — 

May she live for forty years 
And never get another. 



NORFOLK 

OYSTE RS 

DAILY 

Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St. Both Phones 356 


J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 






HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 






ROBERT SIMPSON 

DRUGGIST AND PRESCRIPTIONIST 


H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 

For Toilet Requisites and 
Colds Drinks 


nnnn things always at 


BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 


EAT 
BETTS' ICE CREAM 


RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything In Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the onlv pet feet "heater 

niaae. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Fayetteville St. 



KIN G-CRO WELL'S DRLG STORE 



AND SODA FOUNTAIN 



Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 



CHAS. E. JOHNSON, 
President. 

G. H. DOKTCH, 
Secretary. 



A. A. THOMPSON, 
Treasurer. 

R. S. BTJSBEE, 
General Manager. 



A maid with a duster 
Once made a great bluster, 

A dusting a bust in the hall; 
And when it was dusted, 
The bust it was busted — 

That is all. 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 
Office 20934 Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



L ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCTCRS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING NOTHING 
EXCEEDS THE 

GAS RANGE 

Always Ready. No Dirt. No Ashes 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Welsbach, "The Light that Does 
Not Flicker/' 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

8 West Martin Street. 



Advertisements. 



DARNELL &. THOMAS 
Music House 

Established 1887 

Pianos, Organs, Small Instruments, Sheet 
Music and Instruction Books 

Raleierh, - - North Carolina 



MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 
OF RAJ.KIGH, N. C. 

Capital 8100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. \ V. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

4S* Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
design? and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 




CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 



Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones 



■■{ 



174 
226 



THE HOTEL RALEIGH 

INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 



A great amount of bluffing, 
Lots of air quite hot, 

Make a recitation 

Seem like what it's not. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



INSURANCE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 
THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 



SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 
YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. PULLEN, 
Pres.. Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



Chab. E. Johnson 

PRESIDENT 



F. H. Briggs 

CASHIER 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round steps bank" since 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS. Raleigh, N. C — 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly dr Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

DR. F. D. CASTLEBURY 

DENTIST 

AYCOCK & WINSTON 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW RALEIGH, N. C. 

JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

Dr. D. E. EVERETT 

D ENTI8T 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

dry goods, notions and shoes 
210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY- GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 



22 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 
Garments at our store because we sell better goods 
for less money 

THE FASHION 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

Why is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular ? 
ASK THE GIRLS 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO. 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

C. E. HARTGE— ARCHITECT 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD-MILLINERY 

13 West Hargett St. Phone 632 

10% off to Faculty and Boarding Pupils 

SHOES 

12 East Martin Street 

PEEBLES & EDWARDS 

DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON 

DENTIST 
116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Books and Stationery 

113 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

GREEN & WATSON 

Art Store 
11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 

Phone 953-R 

217J^ Fayetteville Street 



N. H. MOORE 

Repairer of Fine Shoes 

Fayetteville Street 



MISS SMITH 

DRESSMAKER 

Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advektisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs. Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 
Rich Jewelry and Silverware 

Repairing promptly done 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store. 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th St?., Washington, D. C, la now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and Imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



Location Central for the C arolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



70th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1911 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1912. 



\ 1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's I 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these > & THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: [ ^ TRE ARJ1 qqjjqq^ 

THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



\i 



In 1911-12 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and otlier information wldress 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



{Efje 



ftt iBarp's Jffluae 



1912 



January* 




&aietgfj, it C 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Vol. XVI. January, 1912. No. 5 



New Year, the King 



Virginia Randolph Boixing Pickel. 



I. 

Today I answer to a king's high call, 
Princely his mien, bearing in his train 

Treasures past telling, which he gives to all 
Who truly seek within his one-year reign. 

II. 

And offices he has that he bestows 

On all who live, whether they fain would frown 
Upon their charge or smile. He gives all those 

Function, as serf or knight or witless clown. 

III. 

Yet 'tis we must choose our gifts from out his store, 
For free though binding is this great king's rule, — 

And we must say by high or humble score 
Whether we be his knight or jesting fool. 



After the Holidays 



After the morning service in the Chapel, school began just as if it 
had never ended and teachers and girls returning, and those for the 
first time entering, alike ushered in the New Year with resolutions to 
make fruitful the months of study and play that stretched before them. 
All boarders were to have arrived by Wednesday, January 3, 1912, so, 
nearly all greetings, welcomings and interchanging of stories of Christ- 
mas holiday joys having taken place upon the previous night, there 
was nothing to keep the work upon Thursday from taking its regular 
course. The day's routine was not altogether unchanged, however, for 



108 The St. Mary's Muse. 



the first hour of school usually devoted to the Bible classses was taken 
up by an address made by the Eeverend Wilbur F. Crafts, uncle of 
Miss Crafts, of the Faculty, and former pastor of the Brick Presbyte- 
rian Church in New York. 

Starting out with the purpose of forwarding the extermination of 
the importation and use of alcoholic drinks in Africa and opium in 
Asia, Dr. Crafts in 1906 for fourteen months traveled in Europe 
and Asia and since his return to America has been giving lectures 
in which he tells of his experiences and his personal interviews with 
the great men in whose countries he sojourned. The address was very 
interesting. 

The News and Observer of the next day gave the following account : 

Yesterday morning Dr. Wilbur F. Crafts, superintendent of the International 
Reform Bureau, gave an interesting lecture to the young ladies of the school, 
descriptive of his fourteen months tour of four continents in promotion of the 
crusade to suppress the traffic in opium and liquors in missionary lands. 

He also gave an account of an hour's interview with Count Okuma, the "Grand 
Old Man" of Japan, on the problem of moral education in schools representing 
a variety of religions. 

Dr. Crafts suggested that the Lord's Prayer might be appropriately used in 
such schools, not only as an expression of devotion and brotherhood, but also as 
an ethical outline, since it was approved as "The Universal Prayer," and so used 
by representatives of all the great religions at the Congress of Religions at the 
Chicago World's Fair. The Ten Commandments was also urged as suitable for 
universal use as an authoritative outline of ethics, in that it is the basis of the 
Christian civilization which Japan and China and all other lands are adopting 
as the best civilization. "You can't keep the fruits without the roots," Dr. 
Crafts said in this connection to Count Okuma, a Confucian, but appreciative of 
the good influence of Christianity in Japan. For further development of ethical 
details, Dr. Crafts showed the Count that resort might be had to modern science, 
which gives its mighty sanction to Sunday rest, total abstinence, and personal 
purity. The Count cordially approved the municipal poster method of making 
known to everybody on the very streets, the perils of even the most moderate 
home use of the purest beer and wine. Dr. Crafts said that it was most sur- 
prising that while Great Britain and Australia had adopted this poster method 
of scientific temperance extension, Canada and the United States, otherwise in 
the lead, had so far failed to do so. He regarded the poster as the best means 
to stem the receding tide of temperance sentiment, and send it forward again, 
not this time as a "wave," but as a resistless tide, to which there should be no 
ebb because based on scientific anti-alcohol certainties. 

P. H. S. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 109 



Epiphany 



Elleneen E. Checkley. 



By high stars led, 
With great hopes sped, 
From East to West, 
On glorious quest 
The Wise Men tread! 

Thro' desert sand, 

And alien land, 
Their star abides, 
And onward guides 

That Hope-drawn band! 

Nor fray, nor stay, 

Nor devious way, 
Can turn aside 
Their seeking wide, 

Befall what may! 

Beyond each bar, 

They follow far 
The beckoning gleam, 
The Heavenly beam, 

Their fair great Star! 

Until at last, 

The long way past, 
By stable door, 
O'er manger floor, 

Their star stays fast! 

******* 

With great light led, 
With rare gifts sped, 

Is this the end 

To which they wend?- 
A stable shed! 



110 The St. Mary's Muse. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



NELLIE HENDRICKS and MARY HANCOCK OWEN, Editors. 



The Spirit of Christmas Love 



Harriet Lakneb. 



This is a story for those prosaic mortals who are unable to conceive 
of fairy people ; a story of the time when I was one of the little men. 

We all change form, in the passing of centuries, and I was about as 
long as a pretty woman's ring finger. They called me Neil, and I 
wore the traditional "green jacket, red cap, and white owl's feather," 
the very smallest feather of the very smallest owl, too. 

Well, one Xmas Eve long ago was just slipping into a Xmas Day 
when I left the banquet given by his Elfship of Pinminster. I felt 
dissatisfied with things in general. A Xmas festival, true enough, 
but the guest of honor was not there, — the Spirit of Xmas had not 
been invited. There were hordes of fair ladies at the banquet, — the 
so irresistible Spirit of Revelry, the Spirit of the Plum Pudding, the 
sister Spirits of Wit and of the Dance, and many more, some coarse, 
some attractive to the eye. Together, they thought they well took the 
place of the true Spirit of Xmas love, but there was something want- 
ing, and I went alone into the purple night, bored and unsatisfied. 

Soon I felt so dull, and my head ached so that I could not go on, but 
went to sleep in the hollow of a lady's slipper. Then there came the 
dream, of the kind that come true, among us Little Men ; I saw a Pixie 
girl, deep in the mosses and ferns that edged a river. She was asleep, 
and I knew her to be the Spirit of Xmas, for the Spirit of Xmas had 
been sleeping for many years. 

When I awoke I went to see the lepracaun, or fairy shoemaker — 
for he knows all about these things. And when I had told him about 
it, he gave me a shoe, made of the four leaves of a shamrock, and told 
me to start out, anywhere, and I would see what I would see. 

I followed my nose, which is a remarkably straight one, and finally 
came to the Columbkill River. I was tired, and I knew not how to 



The St. Maey's Muse. Ill 

cross, so I made some crispy pancakes of the yellow tide foam, and 
accidentally dropped my little green shoe in the water. When I recov- 
ered it, I found a dense bridge of white mist spanning the river, and I 
crossed over. 

Right in my path there lay a wounded lady-bug. She made no reply 
when I addressed her, and on looking more closely at her I found that 
she had one of her poor little feathery wings torn, and was fluttering 
helplessly. I thought that one could scarcely refuse help to a suffering 
lady — even though she be a bug — so I pulled out several strands of hair 
and bound up her wings, and then took her up, to put her on a violet's 
petal, out of harm's way. 

But when I turned — why, I fairly ran into the waking Spirit of 
Xmas ! Yes, she awoke, at the first kind deed done near her, — and 
the first golden light of Xmas Day was slowly dawning in the east. 
The Xmas Spirit of love, once aroused, is always young and on the 
alert, and her popularity has increased a thousandfold yearly among 
us fairy folk. 



A Christmas Dream 



Margaret Strange Broadfoot. 



Elsie snuggled down among the pillows on the divan in the library 
and drew the steamer rug which covered her even closer. A bright 
wood fire glowed and crackled in the open fireplace, and she had been 
lying watching it for some time trying to believe she saw all sorts of 
hidden secrets revealed there ; for would not tomorrow be Christmas 
Eve ? Christmas Eve, she thought with a delighted little start ! The 
time to hang up one's stocking "by the chimney with care" and prepare 
for old Santa Claus, who was surely coming. She could almost hear 
the crunching of snow as his reindeer carried him swiftly from house 
to house, and see his sleigh overflowing with holly, mistletoe, sweet- 
meats and toys of all kinds ; and yes, surely there was the tinkle of dis- 
tant sleigh-bells, and the echo of a Christmas carol. 

The fire, which a moment before was crackling and sparkling with 
parti-colored flame, had filled the room with a drowsy warmth, and now 



112 The St. Mary's Muse. 

it bad burned until it seemed to Elsie to be merely a glowing mass of 
red coals. No, not red coals, sbe tbougbt, wonderingly, but — wbat did 
it look like ? A bouse ? No, not a bouse, besides, bow could a bouse 
be in a fire ? Nobody bad ever seen sucb a very queer tbing before ; 
and yet tbat was just exactly wbat it was, a bouse, or rather a log 
cabin, for Elsie remembered now, baving seen one just like it in one 
of ber bistories. It was built out of trees, bewn down and put together 
in tbe rougbest way; and was so very little and plain. Inside tbe 
bouse tbe cracks in tbe wall were only stopped up, and it didn't look 
a bit pretty eitber. Wby, bow funny there wasn't any furniture like 
tbey bad in tbeir house, but only some rude benches and a table or two, 
and bow could people have a house without any pictures on the walls 
and without many rooms with carpets on the floors and curtains at the 
windows ? It was Christmas and yet, why, there was not a single 
stocking hung from the crude cbimneypiece. What a dismal house 
indeed, without even a pantry in which to store the Christmas pud- 
dings, pies and cakes. Surely the wretched inmates of this still more 
wretched dwelling did not know bow to really celebrate Christmas. 
Christmas, a real Christmas, meant a turkey, everything good to eat, 
presents, firecrackers, Christmas trees covered with candles and tinsel, 
the chimes of the great city churches ringing out the tidings of "Peace 
on earth, good will toward men," and the singing of the Christmas 
carols that were like the songs the angels sang when the Christ child 
was born in a manger at Bethlehem. Before fully realizing how dreary 
Christmas day spent in this cabin would have been, her attention was 
attracted by a company of about twenty men walking soberly along 
with guns swung over tbeir shoulders. How strange ! They were with 
ladies, too, and were going towards another queer little log building 
tbat was a church and a church with neither bell nor steeple. These 
people were dressed in the quaintest manner imaginable and greatly 
resembled pictures in ber American history. But why were they tak- 
ing guns to church on Christmas when peace was over all the earth? 

"Elsie, Elsie, you've slept so long, child, and supper is nearly ready ; 
do wake up, dear !" and her mother gently shook her by the shoulder. 

"Well, if I didn't have the queerest dream in the world," Elsie mur- 
mured, and when her mother had heard her dream she decided that it 



The St. Maky's Muse. 113 

must have been of that first Christmas on American soil, long, long ago, 
when ears were strained to catch sounds of lurking foes and hands 
tightly gripped belligerent rifles even while through the quiet of the 
little church the words "Peace on earth, good will to men" fell from the 
lips of the old and revered leaders of the little band. 



Christmas Morning 



Irma Deaton. 



The earth is sleeping 'neath the starry sky, 
No sound disturbs the stillness of the night; 

The moon looks calmly from her throne on high, 
The slumb'ring world is bathed in silent light. 

Hark! from yon tower that pierces the clear sky, 
A little bell rings through the stilly air; 

The morning dawns — the blessed Christmas morn — 
And never morning dawned on earth more fair. 

Now, one by one the little stars grow dim, 
The moon fades slowly in the dawning light; 

The drowsy world awakes — is full of life, 
The Christmas spirit in each heart glows bright. 

Hail, happy day! hail, blessed Christmas morn! 

Whereon the angels sang our Saviour's birth; 
When rang the heavens with their songs of praise, 

And joy: "Good will to men, and peace on earth!" 



A Santa Claus by Proxy 



Patsey Harry Smith. 



Christmas was certainly in the air. In truth, it seemed to pervade 
the very atmosphere — that is, to nearly every one it seemed to, — to 
John Charles Derlane it did not. The holly wreaths with their fes- 
tooned ribbons, fresh greenness and scarlet berries were a warning to 
all to hasten forward the last preparations for the Christmas of 1911, 



114 The St. Maky's Muse. 



now but two days distant ; while the toys in the shops and great depart- 
ment stores defied the thick moisture on the glasses of their windows 
to hide their many wonders from those who passed upon the snowy 
pavements in the gloom and mist of the early December morning. 
However, the Christmas decorations might just as well never have been 
fashioned and the toys might just as well have remained unfinished in 
the factories for all that John Charles Derlane either noticed or cared. 
As he sat in his office opening his morning mail one might have taken 
him for a second Scrooge, and yet not one. A Scrooge in that he had 
no Christmas in his soul, but money enough to give Christmas to many 
who would care so much for the Christmas joys. Not a Schooge either, 
because he was young, tall, not altogether displeasing to the eye and 
would have made three of the original Scrooges. That John Charles 
Derlane was bored with life, the world, and himself was evident to the 
most casual observer. Never had he been more bored than upon this 
morning. It seemed to him that the world in which he moved was 
made up of social forms, polished surfaces, and was utterly lacking in 
sincerity. There was no real interest anywhere. If only there was 
something that it was necessary for him to do. He worked because it 
was one of the means to make the long days shorter, just as he danced, 
frequented the clubs, attended dinners and gave theater parties to pass 
away the evenings. Wealth seemed to dog his steps at every turn, and 
so used was he to the manifold luxuries that his mind was deadened to 
the fact that there were vast numbers in the great city in daily need of 
the bare necessities of life. Upon this particular morning he wished to 
forget everything connected with Christmas. It made him almost ill 
to hear the young people of his set flippantly babbling of the "spirit of 
Christmas." "Spirit of Christmas," bah ! What did they mean by it ? 
Nothing, unless perhaps that a forced energy would be added to the 
usual round of festivities. There was no real happiness in it. Long 
ago, it seemed ages, when he was a very little boy, he remembered 
spending a Christmas in the country with an old aunt of whom he was 
very fond. He was very happy then, but that was before the vast for- 
tune of his Uncle Poncelet had descended upon his family, revolu- 
tionizing the simple home life held by him so dear and making social 
butterflies of his mother, his two sisters and himself. He gloomily 



The St. Mary's Muse. 115 



decided that he was no better, no worse than his associates — the only 
difference being that they could fool themselves into believing that they 
were really happy, he could not. 

So he sat. opening his morning mail with a very Scrooge-like expres- 
sion of discontent on his exceedingly unScrooge-like features. 

A very tiresome affair it was, opening one dry business letter after 
another, and it seemed that the task was an unending, one. At last 
when the large pile of mail had been almost level with the desk top, 
upon opening one letter the face of the man became alive with interest. 
Picking up the empty envelope, he re-read the address, glanced at the 
unfamiliar writing, hesitated and frowned as if weighing some per- 
plexing question in his mind, and then turned again to the contents of 

the letter: 

Almont, Dec. 23, 1911. 

Dearest John: — Oh, I am in such a dilemma! If only I might see you — I can 
never make you understand how much depends on you by merely writing. You, 
my, Lord, John Charles, are to descend from your lofty pinnacle and be — a 
Santa Claus! I know I'm writing just as I feel, all confused and excited and 
that your head is already in a whirl and that you fear your brilliant sister has 
lost her mind, so I'll try to be more calm and as for you, I beseech thee to both 
hearken unto and obey my words. 

You know how I simply adore my work down here and how I've striven to 
bring joy as well as learning into the lives of these poor factory people. Con- 
ditions are better than ever before, but goodness knows there's room for im- 
provement still. I like teaching better every day, and Thanksgiving I gave 
my pupils the nicest, biggest dinner they'd ever enjoyed and it was such fun, 
although I did miss being home dreadfully. Of course I know you don't 
approve of my working and becoming so engrossed in the narrow little life of 
this place, but what good, pray, is my college education if not to help me help 
others? Don't laugh at my "extremely ultra notions," as you call them, and 
you know very well that I could not enjoy myself half so much if I knew that 
you were using the money needed for your law course to enable me to be "La 
femme attractive de societe." 

Well, now haven't I rambled far from my subject, though? Loquacity thou 
wilt be the death of woman yet! 

To begin all over again for the third time, there is to be a wonderful, a per- 
fectly wonderful, Christmas tree in my school, Christmas eve. Tall, jolly Will 
Atkins was to have been Santa Claus, and I've had such a time teaching him 
his role. Today he got hurt while manipulating one of the machines in the 
central factory and so is out of the question for tomorrow night. To attempt 
to train another Santa Claus out of these solemn, work-absorbed people is not 
to be thought of, so you are to come and be a substitute. You needn't shake 

2 



116 The St. Maey's Muse. 



your head, for it won't do any good. You are to be Santa Claus. It is all 

settled. You are to get your suit at and bring with you the toys and 

"funds" I've ordered from the same place. You're to be just your funny, ridicu- 
lous self and you'll make the finest Santa Claus ever. 

The Christmas tree begins at 7:30 and you can arrive on the 7:00 train. At 
10:45 we'll take the train that will put us in the city an hour later, and then 
Christmas day we'll lark until there's no end to it, — you, mother, Emily and I, 
and we'll ask that poor lonely old man who stays in the flat across the street 
and who plays the violin so beautifully to take Christmas dinner with us. Why 
I can hardly wait until day after tomorrow! 

I'm not considering for a moment that you'll say no. If you write I'll not 
open the letter, so heavy, heavy hangs over your head. 

Love, Ruth. 

Twice did the erstwhile bored John Charles read this letter, seeming 
to find new satisfaction from each perusal, and then for a second time 
he fingered the envelope and looked closely at its inscription. Imme- 
diately he started and a dark flush suffused his face, for although the 
address paid the initials were the same, the rather blurred surname 
might stand for Merlahe as well as Derlane. So the letter was intended 
for the young lawyer, J. C. Merlane, whose office was in the same 
building. Hastily replacing the letter in its envelope he started for 
the door, when suddenly he stopped, retraced his steps, and with a 
look upon his face that quite transfigured it softly soliloquized: "I 
know its dead wrong and nervy until you can't think, but I can't resist, 
I've got to know the writer of that letter — By Jove, I'll be a Santa 
Claus by proxy!" 

******* 

It was Christmas Eve, and all was bustle and excitement in the little 
factory settlement of Almont. By a little past seven a crowd had 
already begun to gather in front of the schoolhouse. Within this build- 
ing in the very center of its large square room was such a tree as to 
make those not accustomed to Christmas visions fairly gasp with aston- 
ishment. A tree, glittering and sparkling throughout its cone-shaped 
spaciousness, with its brilliancy enhanced by the glow cast from the 
red-shaded lamps in the four corners of the room. Putting a last few 
touches to this tree stood a graceful young woman, clad in a dress of 
some dark stuff which brought out effectively the rich coloring of her 
very expressive face. In her dark hair was a spray of holly red with 



The St. Maby's Muse. 117 



berries and in her grey eyes, shadowed by the long black lashes, was a 
look of childlike anticipation and delight. More than once she glanced 
at the large clock upon the schoolroom wall, a look of anxiety crossing 
her face each time. Could it be possible that her letter had not reached 
John, or could his train be late, or could John, after getting the letter, 
have decided not to come ? Surely not this last ; and again she tried to 
busy herself with an imagined defect in the tinsel trimmings. Just as 
she turned almost despairingly for a last look at the clock the sound of 
sleigh bells growing less faint fell upon her ears and sent a thrill of 
exultation through her whole being. Catching up her long cloak, she 
wrapped herself in it and stepped out among the crowd of men, women 
and children, all of whom were eas-erlv pazino- toward the bend in the 
road around which glided a sleigh whose lamps made paths of light 
upon the snow and brought into bold relief the six strange creatures 
drawing it. Creatures, I say, because as to antlers they were certainly 
reindeer, while in other ways they showed unmistakable signs of once 
having been horses. Was there ever such a sight ! And in the sleigh 
sat a real Santa Claus whose broad shoulders seemed to bend beneath 
the weight of the enormous bulging sack he lifted from the depths of 
the sleigh upon arriving at the schoolhouse door. 

If, when passing through the crowding groups of wondering parents 
and breathless, frightened and excited children, this Titan Santa Claus 
experienced in his inmost depths a feeling very near akin to stage 
fright, and if, when the wonderfully radiant young lady with the still 
more wonderful grey eyes laid a light hand upon his own and whis- 
pered, "You're a perfect dear," his heart thumped to really an alarm- 
ing extent, there were no outward manifestations of anything not suit- 
able to the bearing of a jovial St. Nick. Gayly he assisted Ruth in 
ushering in the people, now almost beside themselves with excitement. 
When all had entered there began such a Christmas Eve as never before 
was seen. With quips, jests and kindly greetings John Charles began 
his role as Santa Claus, distributing presents from a seemingly unend- 
ing store, amidst shrieks of delighted wonder, cries of surprise and 
hearty guffaws of deep-felt merriment. Twice was the huge sack re- 
plenished from the waiting sleigh, and fruits, candies, nuts, toys of all 
kinds, mittens, gloves, hoods, sweaters, coats and mufflers, the practical 



118 The St. Mary's Muse. 

vying with the frivolous were showered upon the wide-eyed inmates of 
the room until the young believed themselves in Fairyland and the old 
that they had made a mistake and were less wise than their children 
in refusing to believe in the existence of a real Santa Claus. 

Ruth never looked more lovely, as with shining eyes and glowing face 
she made adequate responses to such exclamations as "Miss Ruth, do 
come see my red sled"; "Mis' Ruth, just see my beautiful sweater"; or 
"Will yez look, Miss Ruth, at the foin coat my Peter has to keep the 
wind from himself, thanks to yez and yon kind Santa." At length, 
when the pockets of all were filled well nigh to bursting and the hands 
and arms of each and every one full to overflowing, she seated herself 
at the rude piano and led in the singing of the Christmas hymn which 
was to end the night's festivities. All sang with a vim, but when from 
the tall Santa Claus there rolled forth a full, rich tenor, Ruth's hands 
almost jangled the keys and her voice nearly failed her, for never in 
her whole life had she known her brother to utter a tune. Why he 
couldn't sing! He never had sung! Then who was this usurping 
Santa Claus ? Why, oh why, had not her suspicions been aroused at 
once by the number of presents which far exceeded those she had 
ordered ? Could she possibly wait a moment longer before trying to 
solve the mystery. She glanced up at the unsuspecting John Charles, 
but he was singing as never man sang before. He was singing with his 
whole soul. Later he would explain everything to the owner of the 
fresh, sweet voice that was giving unconscious inspiration to his own. 
He would plead unceasingly until he'd received forgiveness and an 
invitation to be an invited guest along with the lovely old violinist at 
the Christmas dinner at her home upon the morrow. Sing ! Why he 
could shout from the very joy of it all. Henceforth he would have a 
duty, for he had found the true worth to which wealth could be turned. 
There was real happiness, real sincerity in the great world. Tomorrow 
was Christmas and he had found that for which he had long sought — the 
spirit of Christmas. In Ruth he found it in its loveliest form — the 
spirit of Christmas incarnate. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 119 



Christmas Stories from the Primary School 



Once upon a time there was a little girl and her name was Jenny. 
She was very poor and her father was a poor farmer. "Tomorrow will 
be Christmas," said Jenny, "and I won't have any Christmas presents 
because my father is so poor," and she began crying. 

"Don't cry any more," said her sister, who was nine years of age, 
"I will give you my little doll for a Christmas present." 

So she (Jenny) woke up on Christmas morning and she found that 
Santa Claus had been to her house and brought her a new doll, and so 
she was very happy Christmas. She thought she would have an un- 
happy Christmas, but she didn't. Her sister gave her her doll for a 
Christmas present and she said it was the happiest Christmas she 
ever had. Virginia Page Royster (Aged 9). 



Once upon a time there were (two) twins, named Thomas and Susan, 
and for short they were called Tom and Sue. 

One day Sue was sitting on the back door steps. It was the day 
before Christmas. 

"Oh, Tom," said Sue, "tomorrow is Christmas and we have not fixed 
the Christmas tree and mamma has forgotten everything about it too." 
So Tom and Sue ran upstairs to their mother and told her about it and 
mamma said they could fix it, and it was in the parlor waiting for 
them, and so they put all sorts of things on it. Pretty soon it was fin- 
ished and they went upstairs, and had supper and then hung up their 
stockings and went to bed. Pretty soon it was morning and the twin? 
woke up. "Merry Christmas, mamma, Merry Christmas," said the 
twins, and mamma let them get in her bed, and they opened their 
stockings and found that Santa Claus had been very good to them. 

Anna Rogers Lay (Aged 10). 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 1911-1912. 

Patsey Harry Smith, Editor-in-Chief. 
Nellie Hendricks, Mary Hancock Owen, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart, Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Evelyn Cameron Maxwell, Susan Porter Rawlings. 

Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon, Business Manager. 
Caroline Clarke Jones, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



The joys of memory have been called "bitter-sweets" and the present 
more distasteful on account of past pleasures; but is that altogether 
true ? Of course it is hard to come back from the many delectable fes- 
tivities of a Christmas holiday spent at home or at the home of a friend 
and face study, work and the dreaded call of the rising bell in the chill 
gloom of early morning; and yet was it not this very "rising at seven," 
study hall and dormitory hours, that made the joys of the Christmas 
vacation of twice as much value and pleasure ? Then, too, when you 
come to think about it, is it so unbearable to be back again ? Oh, you 
may not admit outright that you are really glad, but in your heart of 
hearts — Why it reminds me of the perplexed old German professor 
who cried in his deep distress : 

" The girls, the girls, they pother me so, 
They cry when they come, and they cry when they go." 

So while remembering, not yearning for past pleasures, let us make 
the best of what in reality is not an evil but a good, and by taking ad- 
vantage of all opportunities afforded in the months to come, make our- 
selves more worthy to appreciate the summer joys sure to follow a 
school term full of diligent work and honest endeavor. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 121 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Susan Porter Rawlings, Editor. 



Patsey Smith Entertains, Nov. 18th 
On Saturday, November 18th, Miss Patsey Smith entertained the 
Muse Club and a few of her intimate friends and teachers with a very 
novel dinner. After all the guests had been cordially greeted by Mrs. 
Smith and Mrs. Maxwell, they entered the dining room, where they 
were dumbfounded by the sight of eight or nine Raleigh and A. and M. 
boys dressed as waiters. 

The small tables which accommodated four each were attractively 
decorated with pumpkins surrounded by fruit, the turkey place cards 
corresponding with the small turkeys which were perched upon the 
pumpkins. A most delicious Thanksgiving dinner was served ; and 
afterwards each person was given a small basket decorated with smilax 
and filled with candied fruits. After doing ample justice to the "feast" 
the girls waited upon the boys. The punch, which was served by Miss 
Olivia Smith, was in the hall. This was decidedly the most original 
and entertaining "party" that could have possibly been imagined. 

Mrs. Jarley's Wax-worKs, Nov. 18th 
Saturday evening, November 18th, St. Catherine's Chapter of the 
Junior Auxiliary gave, in the School Auditorium, a most enjoyable 
performance of "Mrs. Jarley's Wax-works." The identity of Mrs. 
Jarley herself was kept secret, so that a burst of surprised applause 
greeted the appearance on the stage of Miss Thomas in full costume of 
hoop skirt, poke bonnet laden with flowers, and cork-screw curls. 
"Slum" and "Little Nell" were kept very busy dusting and winding up 
the figures, which presented a remarkably stiff and wax-like appear- 
ance. Mrs. Jarley skillfully connected the past with the present by 
"getting off hits" on various girls, thus keeping the audience in a con- 
tinual roar of laughter. Ella King made an excellent "Little Nell," 
while Mary Owen, always a favorite, was particularly good as "Slum." 
One of the features most enjoyed was the fancy dance, in Egyptian 
costume, by Patsey Smith, the "Dancing Doll." 



122 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The whole performance was thoroughly entertaining, and one could 
not help wishing that the wonderful Mrs. Jarley, to whom so much 
credit is due for such an evening of fun, would show us even more of 
her "wax" figures. C. C. J. 

Mrs. Lyon's Lecture, Nov. 20th 

Nine o'clock, Monday morning, November 20th, found the student 
body and various members of the Faculty assembled in the schoolroom 
to hear the promised delightful talk by Mrs. Lyon on the subject of 
"Health." Naturally every one was quite interested in such a subject, 
especially on account of the subtle hints concerning Beauty that were 
thrown out, and the audience was unusually attentive. 

Mrs. Lyon spoke particularly of the influence of fresh air upon the 
general good health, and, for the benefit of those who are not prone 
to consider so much their physical good, upon the complexion. To go 
a step farther, she taught the proper manner in which to breathe a full 
amount of life-giving oxygen, which, if carried out, will insure, as 
well as perfect lungs, the good figure which every girl covets. 

Mrs. Lyon, who is a lecturer of true merit and rare interest, came 
to Raleigh under the auspices of the Woman's Club, but very kindly 
consented to give one of her charming lectures to the St. Mary's girls. 

L. A. L. 

Miss Dowd's Talk Nov. 23d 
Thursday evening, November 23d, Miss Dowd, "one of St. Mary's 
shining lights," spoke in the schoolroom about "Economy." Miss 
Dowd brought in very strongly the application of "Economy" here at 
St. Mary's and we were all thoroughly interested. Many occasions will 
arise when Miss Dowd's advice will be most helpful, and so we hope 
to profit by it; and, as she said, do our work well and cheerfully. 

Peace-St. Mary's Concert, Nov. 23d 
On Thursday night, November the twenty-third, in the St. Mary's 
Auditorium took place the first of this year's Peace-St. Mary's Concert 
Series. There was an unusually large audience to hear Mile. Barnolt 
sing, for her praises were heralded long before her arrival, and it is 
assured, by every one who heard the concert, that Mile. Barnolt is 
another singer in the field whom we must hold in deep respect. When 



The St. Maey's Muse. 123 

she sings, her audience realize her to be a woman with imagination to 
picture, brains to study, and skill to convey the thought and feeling 
to her hearers. 

The Page's Song from "Les Huguenots" was charming — full of 
magnetism and grace. One could picture the magnificently dressed 
page singing to the nobles. The song which pleased, while not the best, 
was the Mammy's song. This number was repeated by request. Mile. 
Barnolt was dressed in a French robe and every move was typically 
"Frenchy." 

Mr. Owen was the accompanist. His talent and ability is always 
appreciated by his hearers, but Mile. Barnolt seemed particularly con- 
scious of having an unusually wonderful accompanist. 

The program was as follows : 

I. a. Habanera (from Carmen) Bizet 

b. Separazione Sgam bati 

G. Der Nussbaum Schumann 

d. Meine Liebe ist Grun Brahms 

II. a. Nobles Seigneurs Salut (Page's Song from "Les Huguenots") . .Meyerbeer 

b. Les Jeunes Fillettes Old French 

c. Chanson du Tigre (from Paul et Virginie) Victor Masse - 

d. Als die Alte Mutter Dvorak 

e. Schmied Schmerz Van Eyeken 

III. a. Vergeblicbes Standchen Brahms 

b. Die Post Schubert 

c. The Monotone Cornelius 

d. Der Erlkonig Schubert 

IV. a. How's My Boy? Homer 

b. Love in a Cottage Ganz 

c. Banjo Song Homer 

Mr. R. Blinn Owen at the Piano. 

A. C. W. 

The Inter-Society Meeting, Nov. 28th 

Tuesday evening, November 28th, a Thanksgiving Inter-Society 
meeting was held in the parlor, presided over by Elizabeth Hughes, 
president of Sigma Lambda. The meeting was opened by singing the 
hymn, "Our Father's God, to Thee" ; after which Patsey Smith recited 
a Thanksgiving recitation, and Kate Smith sang "Cupid's Kiss." 
Then Caroline Jones gave the origin of Thanksgiving, followed bv a 
duet, "A Lover and His Lass," sung by Miss Shull and Mr. Owen. 



124 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The songs were most attractive, receiving enthusiastic encore. The 
meeting was exceedingly entertaining, and quite thrilled us over the 
prospect of Thanksgiving. 

The Meeting of the Schools, Nov. 29th 
Wednesday afternoon, November 29th, the student body and several 
members of the Faculty went down to the Raleigh Auditorium to a 
meeting of all the institutions of learning in the city, presided over by 
Governor W. W. Kitchin, of North Carolina. The meeting was opened 
with a prayer made by Rev. H. M. North, of the Edenton Street Metho- 
dist Church, followed by the singing of "Carolina.'' Then an address 
of welcome was delivered by Honorable J. Y. Joyner, State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction. Mr. R. D. W. Connor, Secretary of the 
Historical Association, and Mr. F. M. Harper, Superintendent of the 
City Schools, made announcements about the Teachers' Association, 
after which "O, Holy Night" was sung by the pupils of the School 
for the Blind. The Governor then announced Mr. Champ Clark's 
speech for Thursday evening; and the meeting was closed by the sing- 
ing of the National Hymn, "America." 

This is the first meeting of its kind that has been held in Raleigh, 
and it was a great success. There were about four thousand represen- 
tatives from the schools and colleges in the city, and about three hun- 
dred superintendents from the State. 

Dr Harrison's TalK. Dec. 7th 
Thursday evening, December 7th, Dr. Harrison, of the A. & M. 
College, spoke to us upon "The Influence of Women in the Home and 
in the Community." Dr. Harrison suggested as an aid to success in 
the home the study of Domestic Science, and the practice of thrift; 
while striving to be a leader will bring influence in the community. 
Dr. Harrison was very interesting, and we enjoyed his talk thoroughly. 

" The Revenge of Shari-Mot-Su " 

Saturday evening, December 9th, the Dramatic Club appeared in 

"The Revenge of Shari-Hot-Su." The play was presented in the 

Auditorium to a large and appreciative audience. Margaret Bottum, 

Frances Pinnix, Maude Reynolds and Anne Turpin made their first 



The St. Mary's Muse. 125 



appearance before the St. Mary's girls, and their success promises them 
great popularity in the future. Elizabeth Tarry, as leading lady, 
proved a veritable "star" ; while Mary Owen and Fredrika Gilbert 
fulfilled the expectations of the audience by their remarkably good 
portrayal of the character parts. The whole play did great credit to 
Miss Davis, of whom many more such entertaining evenings are ex- 
pected in the future, as she has shown her ability and talent in this line. 
The cast was as follows : 

Shari-Hot-Su Sanaa (a learned Japanese) Margaret Bottom 

Kiota (a young Japanese) Prances Pinnix 

Harold Armstrong (a young American) Mary Owen 

Mrs. Beaconstreet (from Boston) Fredrika Gilbert 

Nina (her daughter) Maude Reynolds 

Moig-ui-fa (called "Cherry Blossom") Elizabeth Tabby 

Toy-ama (the mother of Moig-ui-fa) Anne Ttjrpin 

Mr. Lay's TalK 
Thursday evening, December 7th, in the schoolroom, Mr. Lay spoke 
to us about "Examinations and Marks." He made this talk in order 
that all the girls might understand about their marks in the approach- 
ing examinations. We hope and believe that his ideas will be of great 
benefit to us. 



Our Last Night at School Before the Holidays 



Mary Hancock Owen. 



The fun began at dinner over the fried oysters and mince pie. The 
dining-room, bright with red bells and tiny Christmas trees, told its 
own story — "Christmas and you are going home tomorrow." 

After dinner Mr. Lay put us in a somewhat more serious mood by 
his helpful talk. But all serious thoughts were soon forgotten when 
we went to the Auditorium. The program told us we were to see 
"Alice in Wonderland." Alice, the White Kabbit, the Duchess, the 
Queen and King, all the familiar Wonderland names were there, but 
not a suggestion of who was to take the parts. 

But, Oh ! When the curtain went up there was Miss Hey ward as the 
prettiest little Alice asleep in Wonderland. Then, girls, it can not be, 



126 The St. Mary's Muse. 



but yes it is — Miss Thomas as the White Rabbit ! A new girl leaned 
over to a Senior, as one possessing great knowledge, and in an awed 
voice asked, "Did you know she could hop like that ?" 

The whole thing was fine, just fine! Many a girl was heard to 
say, "Wasn't it grand of the teachers to do all that for us ? We don't 
deserve it a bit." 

The programs, with their little water-color sketch of the White Rab- 
bit, gave us the following information: 

ALICE IN WONDERLAND 
As dramatized by Mrs. Burton Harrison from the story of Lewis Carroll. 



The characters in the order of their appearance in the play: 

Alice, 
The White Rabbit, 
Tho Duchess, 
The Cook, 
The Cheshire Cat, 
The Queen of Hearts, 
The King of Hearts, 
The Knave of Hearts, 
The Executioner, 
The March Hare, 
The Hatter, 
The Dormouse, 
The Mock Turtle, 
The Gryphon, 

Guards, Pages, Ladies and Gentlemen of the Court, etc. 

Act I: A Wood in Wonderland. 
Act II: The Mad Tea Party. 
Act III: The Knave's Trial. 

SYNOPSIS. 

Act I. — Alice awaking finds herself in Wonderland, meets the White Rabbit, 
the Duchess and Cook, and the Cheshire Cat, and is present at the Court Proces- 
sion, which ends in the Queen's Quadrille. 

Act II. — Alice uninvited joins the Mad Tea Party, fails to guess the Hatter's 
riddle, hears the Dormouse's story, and becomes acquainted with the Gryphon 
and the Mock Turtle. 

Act III. — Alice is an interested onlooker at the trial of the Knave of Hearts. 

From the Auditorium we went to the Christmas tree. There each 
of us got a present in shape of a hit. A loaf of bread for the hungry 



The St. Mary's Muse. 127 

girl, a mirror for the vain one, and for Mr. Lay a magnet to help 
him draw the girls back to school on time. 

However, the best of things must end, so our happy evening closed 
with Christmas hymns and carols. 



Christmas at St. Mary's 



There was a small number of girls who spent the holidays at this 
school this year, but enough to have a very bright, merry time of it 
The girls who stayed all the time were Harriet Larner, Elsie Brown 
and Penelope Gallop, with Fredrika Gilbert and Bessie Green here 
part of the time. Miss Limey, Miss Lillian Fenner, Miss Shull, Mr. 
and Mrs. Cruikshank, and Mr. Lay's family, which included George, 
home for the holidays, and Mrs. and Miss Balch made up the rest of 
the vacation family. A decided change in the usual holiday order was 
the use of "Senior Hall" instead of Main Building as a home for those 
who stayed. Two of the lower rooms in Main Building were used, 
one as dining room, one as kitchen, and were heated by gas stoves, but 
the rest of the building was closed, and all of the other houses except 
East Rock. 

The first part of the vacation was spent by every one in getting off 
Christmas packages and receiving large quantities which arrived by ex- 
press, generally quite late at night, and by mail in huge sacks, long 
after the regular hours. But with all of this business there was time 
for games and reading, for a whole evening given up to decorating the 
dining room for Christmas. The result of this was a room bright with 
Christmas bells and holly, and gleaming with festooned trees. The 
Christmas service was a short one, held in the Chapel at ten o'clock. 

There were a number of little entertainments given of the informal, 
pleasant kind. There was an evening at the Rectory, a chafing dish 
party in Fredrika Gilbert's room, a Mother Goose party given by Mr. 
and Mrs. Cruikshank, an afternoon tea party — with cards — by Miss 
Limey and Miss Shull. and of course Christmas boxes having come, there 



128 The St. Maey's Muse. 

were feasts at all hours of the night and day — and so it all went on very 
happily and everybody felt "at home and free," and certainly not more 
than half sorry when the first girls began arriving on Wednesday after- 
noon and the school year of 1912 was really here. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN— CLIPPINGS 



Lina Lockhaet, Editor. 



They're coming at an early date, 
To make us cram and jam our pate 
And mournfully await our fate, — 
Examinations! 

I wish I were a Hottentot, 
And lived in some secluded spot, 
Where thro* the ages there come not 
Examinations. 



A wise old owl sat in an oak, 

The more he saw the less he spoke, 

The less he spoke the more he heard, 
Why can't we be like that old bird? 



As James was going out one eve, 
His mother questioned, "Whither?" 

And James, not wishing to deceive, 
With blushes answered, "With her." 



We laugh at our teacher's jokes, 
No matter what they may be; 

Not because they're funny jokes, 
But because it's policy. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 129 



A Tale of the Mistletoe 

Now he is six and she is four, 

And there is mistletoe over the door. 

"Kiss me," she says, with a toss of her curls. 

But — "No, indeed, I don't kiss girls." 

Ten years have passed, again they stand 
Under the mistletoe, hand in hand. 
"Kiss me," he says; but his hope she destroys, 
For — "No, indeed, I don't kiss boys." 

Five years go by, and now once more 

Under the mistletoe over the door. 

"Kiss me," he begs, but does not wait 

For the whispered "Yes," which comes too late. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS, 

. . Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - < Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

President - Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - - - Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem. 



EDITORIAL 



The Muse is still without further reports of November meetings 
held by Alumna? Chapters. The Raleigh and Chapel Hill Chapters are 
the only ones from whom anything has been heard. We wish to urge 
the other Chapters to let us have at once reports of any meet- 
ings that may have been held this winter. 

In the last issue the Muse reported that the Raleigh Chapter, headed 
by Miss Annie Root, planned to raise funds for the benefit of the 
Alumna? by means of a play. We are glad to state that this plan is 
being carried out, and we wish to announce the title of the play as 
"You Never Can Tell," a brilliant, comedy of Bernard Shaw, to be 
given about February 20th in the Academy of Music. We are sure 
all of the Alumnse will be interested in this, and will hope for its 
success ; and we feel that our local members will do all in their power 
to aid in its success by their cooperation. 



The St. Maby's Muse. 131 



Alumnae Weddings 



Boykin-BoyKin 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Whitaker Boykin 

request the honor of your company at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Meta Cantry 

to 

Mr. Bolivar de Saussure Boykin 

Wednesday evening, December the twenty-seventh 

at eight o'clock 

Pine Grove 

Boykin, South Carolina 



Jacobs-Gibbs 

Miss ISTina Farrow Gibbs and Mr. Harry M. Jacobs, both of Oriental, 
N. C, were married on January 4th in the First Baptist Church of 
Oriental. 

"Itfina Gibbs" was a student at St. Mary's in 1909-'10, and again in 
1910-'ll, so that many of her schoolmates are still at St. Mary's. They 
wish through The Muse to send the heartiest of good wishes. 



Ehringhaus-Maughton 

Miss Matilda Bradford Haughton, of Washington, N. C, and Mr. 
John Christoph Blucher Ehringhaus were married on Thursday even- 
ing, January 4th, in Saint Peter's Church, Washington, North Carolina. 

All three of the Haughton girls, "Bettie," "Matilda" and "Fannie 
Lamb," have been at St. Mary's, so the Muse feels an especial interest 
in this marriage, and sends the best of good wishes. 



READ !— M ARK I— ACT I 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH. 



NORTH CAROLINA 



" It's worth the difference " 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography" 



"Are men as black," she queried, 
"As they are painted, do you think?" 

In Yankee style I answered her, 
"Are girls," I said, "as pink?" 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OE AH KINDS 



MILLINERY 



-ssSSf^ee- 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery 
Tailored Costumes 
Gloves, Hosiery 
Handkerchiefs 
Fancy Goods 
Underwear 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly 



FAYETTEVII/LE AND SALISBURY ST8. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



Herbert Rosenthal 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILOR ED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 


LADIES' FINE 5HOE5 


131 Favetteville Street, 




Raleigh, N. C. 


INSURE IN THE 

Jefferson Standard Lite Ins. Go. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 


COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 


Strongest in the South 


122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 

CANDY CHINA — TOYS 

PICTURES STATIONERY 



Here's to the girl that gets a kiss 
And runs to tell her mother — 

May she live for forty years 
And never get another. 



NORFOLK 

OYSTE RS 

DAILY 
Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St. Both Phones 356 


J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 






HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 






ROBERT SIMPSON 

DRUGGIST AND PRESCRIPTIONIST 


H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 

For Toilet Requisites and 
Colds Drinks 




BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 


EAT 

BETTS' ICE CREAM 


RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Fayetteville St. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 



AND SODA FOUNTAIN 



Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, 

President. 

G. H. DORTCH, R. S. BTJSBEE, 

Secretary. General Manager. 



A. A. THOMPSON, 
Treasurer. 



A maid with a duster 
Once made a great bluster, 

A dusting a bust in the hall; 
And when it was dusted, 
The bust it was busted — 

That is all.' 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 



Office 209% Fayetteville St. 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowel! 



(.ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON <fe HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING NOTHING 
EXCEEDS THE 

GAS RANGE 

Always Ready. No Dirt. No Ashes 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Welsbach, "The Light thai Does 
Not Flicker." 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

8 West Martin Street. 



Advertisements. 



DARNELL & THOMAS 
Music House 

Established 1887 

Pianos, Organs, Small Instruments, Sheet 
Music and Instruction Books 

Raleigh, - - North Carolina 

MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 

OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital $100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

^Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 



I 




CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 



Electric Light 
and Power 



Both 



Phones:^ 



174 

226 



THE HOTEL RALEIGH 

INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 



A great amount of bluffing, 
Lots of air quite hot, 

Make a recitation 

Seem like what it's not. 



K I N G 'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

INSURANCE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 
THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 



SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 

YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. PULLEN, 
Pres.. Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson 

PRESIDENT 



F. H. Briggs 

CASHIER 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round STEPS bank" SINCE 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C.— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

Jolly £r Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

DR. F. D. CASTLEBURY 

DENTIST 

AYCOCK & WINSTON 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW RALEIGH, N. C. 

JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

Dr. D. E. EVERETT 

DENTIST 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY-GROCERIES 

BEST OP EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

22 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 
Garments at our store because we sell better goods 
for less money 

THE FASHION 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

Why is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular ? 
ASK THE GIRLS 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 




St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 
127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N C. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

C. E. HARTGE— ARCHITECT 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD-MILLINERY 

13 West Hargett St. Phone 632 

10% off to Faculty and Boarding Pupils 

SHOES 

12 East Martin Street 

PEEBLES & EDWARDS 

DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON 

DENTIST 
116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Books and Stationery 

113 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

GREEN & WATSON 

Art Store 

11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 

Phone 953-R 

217J^ Fayetteville Street 



N. H. MOORE 

Repairer of Fine Shoes 

Fayetteville Street 



MISS SMITH 

DRESSMAKER 

Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 


SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 


T. W. BLAKE 
Rich Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing promptly done 


watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 


Ds. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 





Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

70th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1911. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1912. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's ( 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these ) & THE BL SI NESS SCHOOL. 



Departments . 



I .4. THE ART SCHOOL. 
J 5. THE PREPARATORY 



SCHOOL 



In 1911-12 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

liftlw . 



tEfje 



g>t. JWarp'g JWuse 



^rtnwrp, 1912 



<$» 



fcaUtgt), JL C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Vol. XVI. Febeuaby, 1912. No. 6 



Father Valentine 



IRMA DEATON. 



In all the country 'round about, 

Where'er the sun did shine, 
Was never seen so kind a man 

As Father Valentine. 

He fed the hungry, clothed the poor; 

And went from door to door 
To comfort those who labored there 

With heavy hearts and sore. 

And then to gladden their sad lives, 

The good man used to send 
To them some kind and thoughtful verse 

Which he himself had penned. 

But when he told them of the Christ 

And of His Wondrous love, 
How to a lost world He had come 

Down from His home above, 

The people, jealous for their gods 
Of bronze and wood and stone, 

To anger roused, straightway forgot 
The good that he had done. 

And in a damp, dark cell they shut 

Poor Father Valentine, 
Where never breathed the air of Heaven, 

Nor came the bright sunshine. 

And when, one day, the people came, 

Remorseful, to his cell, 
To free him whom they had betrayed, — 

Though he had loved them well, — 



134 . The St. Mary's Muse. 



Their torches showed them, on the floor, 

A sight sad to behold, — 
The body of good Valentine, 

In death, all still and cold. 

Then they bewailed him loud and long, 

And swore that every year, 
Upon the day on which he died, 

To friends and kindred dear, 

Some little verse of loving thought 
Each one of them would send, 

As long as he lived on the earth, 
In memory of his friend. 

And this is why today we send, 

Upon the good saint's day, 
Tokens of love to all our friends, 

Both near and far away. 



February 22d, IT99 



Alice Lacy, '13. 



General Washington was standing on the front steps of his beautiful 
home, Mt. Vernon. It was in February, and the cold breeze which 
blew up from the Potomac and chilled him through and through, caused 
him to realize that he no longer possessed the warm blood of youth 
which had sustained him through so many trying experiences during 
his early surveying days in the West. 

Tomorrow would be the twenty-second day of the month — his sixty- 
seventh birthday! The thought saddened him, despite his philosophi- 
cal way of looking at things. Just then Mrs. Washington's grand- 
daughter, Nelly Custis, ran gaily across the lawn, waving to him a 
cheery greeting. She seemed to be in a very great hurry, and he 
smiled as he noticed how active she was — just as he had once been. 
He went over in his mind the years which she had spent in his home, 
gladdening it with her bright presence, and her brave straightforward- 
ness — product of his own teaching. He thought, too, with grave ten- 
derness, of the love which had grown up between her and his own 



The St. Mary's Muse. 135 

nephew, Lawrence Washington ; and of the satisfaction which it would 
be to him, when he might entrust her to the protecting care of this boy. 
The arrival of his saddle horse about this time put an end to his 
soliloquy. He set out for Alexandria in a very cheerful frame of 
mind, and spent the rest of the day there, arriving home about dark, 

******* 

The next day there were elaborate preparations going on in the 
kitchen at Mt. Vernon, in anticipation of a grand dinner to be given 
that evening in honor of the birthday of the master. There were to be 
many guests, and the General noted with amusement that the ladies of 
his household seemed to be in a state of such suppressed excitement 
that they hardly knew what they were doing. Especially did Miss 
Custis seem unlike herself; and every few minutes she disappeared 
within her room, only to reappear shortly, blushing rosily. As the 
day wore on, the guests began to arrive — some coming from Alexandria 
in coaches — others from neighboring plantations^ until at length, when 
all had arrived, dinner having been announced^ the General, with a 
courtly bow, offered his arm to one of the ladies, and led the way into 
the dining room. 

When dinner was over^ the General, who had missed Nelly Custis, 
inquired of Mrs. Washington if it were possible that she could be 
walking alone in the moonlight (a favorite pastime of hers). Mrs. 
Washington only smiled mysteriously, and as sudden strains of musie 
were heard, hurried into the living room, followed by her husband. 
Then a sudden hush seemed to have fallen upon all of the guests. 
There seemed to be a note of expectation in the air, which was inten- 
sified, as Mrs. Washington left the room as suddenly as she had entered 
it. She soon returned, leading her granddaughter by the hand. Fair 
Nelly Custis ! How lovely she looked, clad in purest white ! From an 
opposite door Lawrence Washington appeared. He was followed by a 
tall gentleman whom all recognized as the rector of St. Paul's Church, 
in Alexandria. A sweet, solemn stillness pervaded the room as these 
four advanced to the middle of it, where Mrs. Washington laid the 
hand of her granddaughter in that of Lawrence Washington, and going 
to the side of her husband, said : "As a loving surprise for the General, 



136 The St. Maey's Muse. 

my granddaughter and his nephew will celebrate, on this, his birthday 
night, their marriage, to which both he and I have long looked 
forward." 

Somewhere in another room the same soft strains of music which 
had been heard before recommenced ; and surrounded by relatives and 
friends, these descendants of illustrious forefathers were united. 

As Washington stooped to kiss the happy little bride, he whispered: 
"Who was it who told me that the youths of the present day had no 
charms for her?" 



Reclaimed 



Patsey Harry Smith. 



As the winter night approached, a man, tall and broad of shoulder, 
made his way along the fast darkening streets of the city that had 
sprung from the small college town of Bruton. Evidently he was a 
stranger, for there were no signs of recognition or exchanges of greeting 
with the hurrying passers-by, and yet for an utter stranger he walked 
with steps surprisingly sure and unerring towards the college square, 
asking directions from no one. Reaching this square he stopped, and, 
to all outward appearances he was perfectly oblivious to the chilling wind 
that swirled around the corners and flapped his great coat around him ; 
he stood taking in every detail of the majestic college, its supplemental 
buildings and extensive campus, varying and conflicting emotions ex- 
pressing their fleeting existence upon his mobile features. First came 
an expression of unmistakable reminiscence, quickly followed by one 
of wistfulness, and then as snatches of school songs, whistle calls and 
other sounds, indicative of student activities, fell upon his ears, his 
whole being seemed to assume another self, the shoulders squared them- 
selves of their deceptive stoop and unsuspected fires kindled in the 
somber eyes of the man. As if forgetting the lapse of years, he moved 
towards the main entrance, erect, with head thrown back, but suddenly 
he checked his movements, and with his entire bearing suggesting 
dejection and with a look of ineffable sadness, he turned to continue 



The St. Mary's Muse. 137 

his now aimless walk through streets once so familiar to him. On the 
next corner he cast one swift, all-encompassing glance at the home of 
the college president, which from the visible hurrying of servants to 
and fro within and from the coming and going of florists' carts and 
delivery wagons without, seemed to be undergoing preparations for 
that night's festivities. Probably there was to be a dance there, a 
reception or party, for in all Bruton there was no more hospitable or 
sought after social center than the home of the college president. But 
surely no passing thought of dance or dinner party could have made the 
man pass with averted face, after the first furtive glance, expressing a 
bitterness more distressing than its former sadness. Could this 
strangely mystifying person have had any previous connection with this 
house or its inmates ? If so, no further evidence was given and he 
hurried on until he was made to pause by that which might, well have 
caused any one who chanced to see it stop as did this man. Through 
a long window whose shutters were thrown back and which opened 
upon the street but a few feet above the pavement could be seen a 
most surprising figure — that of a man fully dressed in high boots, coat, 
knee breeches, three-cornered hat and long cape that any man of the 
Colonial period would have considered his complete and befitting attire. 
Most certainly it was a dress suitable for the Revolutionary era, but 
in the twentieth century what could it mean ? Why nothing more or 
less thrilling than that the fine gentleman that so startled one at first 
is just ready for attending a Bal Poudre, and as if to prove this sur- 
mise to be correct, he picked up a black mask from the table before him. 
From the same table he also took an envelope, from which he drew a 
card and this he began to read, glancing at the clock upon the mantel 
as he did so. After thrusting the card and its envelope into one of his 
numerous pockets, he was about to wrap his long cloak around him 
preparatory to leaving the room when a man, from his dress a servant, 
entered and handed a second envelope to the evident master of the apart- 
ments, who, laying his mask back upon the table, hastily read the con- 
tents of the letter handed him. After this he gave some hurried direc- 
tions to the waiting servant, threw cape, hat and gloves aside, and with 
an expression of keen disappointment and unsuppressed chagrin walked 
into a smaller room leading into the one in which he had been standing, 



138 The St. Maky's Muse. 



and pulled the door to after him. In what seemed but the passing of 
a quarter of an hour or little more he emerged, this time dressed as a 
young man of means of the present day. He took the suit case which 
the servant at that moment brought to him, switched off the lights of 
the room and next was seen as he left the house and entered a cab that 
was waiting for his orders outside the door. 

While all this was happening, the man whose lonely walk had been 
interrupted by the episode had stood without any prickings of his con- 
science gazing into the apartments now left in darkness. Surely now 
he might move on ; but no, — why, can it be possible ? ]STo sooner had 
the sounds of the disappearing cab died away than he ruthlessly stepped 
near to the casement, raised the window, a feat not difficult on account 
of his height and the window's lowness, and entered the room he had 
just seen left by its owner. With a boldness almost unbelievable he 
swung on the lights and then unhesitatingly crossed over to and entered 
the room before spoken of, which was an adjoining one to the apart- 
ment. In an incredibly short time the door of this inner dressing room 
was opened and the man who had entered it such a short while pre- 
viously advanced to the table in the outer room, making a handsome, 
almost a distinguished figure in complete Colonial costume ; and stand- 
ing in the light given by the central chandelier he calmly drew the 
envelope and card from the pocket into which the one for whom they 
were intended had thrust them, and hastily scanned their contents. 
Then, after casting a hasty glance at the clock, he snatched up the mask 
and long cloak from the chair upon which they had been thrown, turned 
off the lights and left the apartments by means of an adjoining vesti- 
bule which led to an outer door. 

******* 

At the home of the President of Bruton College all was excitement. 
Young people in wonderful costumes of 1776 and with faces carefully 
masked were arriving in breathless bevies or in smaller groups of twos 
and fours. In the long dance hall, fairly ablaze with lights, the musi- 
cians were testing treacherous strings and stops to see if at last all was 
in order. Just within the wide door of a front parlor, impatiently tap- 
ping her fan, stood Mrs. Marbery, the hostess of the night and mis- 



The St. Maky's Muse. 139 

tress of the Marbery home. More than once she noted the time upon 
the placid face of the tall hall clock with an expression of increasing 
annoyance upon her pleasant features, murmuring the while : "Why 
doesn't he come ? It is inexcusable for him to be so unpardonably late 
tonight." When at length the waiting footman presented the card of 
one Richard Seelney, and ushered in a tall masked figure in the full 
costume of a Colonial gentleman, she well nigh swooped upon him, 
exclaiming, ''Oh, you dreadful fellow! Were you ever on time in your 
life ? Well, I'll never forgive you for this, because you knew the dance 
couldn't begin until you came. Such behaviour for one who repre- 
sents the 'Father of his Country' on his birthday night ! Here comes 
your partner now and little do you deserve such a privilege. She is 
my niece, you know, Molly Coventry, and she is also the guest of honor." 

Surely there was some grievous mistake. This man was not Rich- 
ard Seelney. Oh, why of course, he was masquerading in the clothes 
of the man whose card he presented as his own. What of him anyway ? 
Could it be possible that he was going to attempt to lead a dance to 
which he came as an unknown intruder ? 

Oh ! if you could only have really known more of him you would 
have understood the deadly pallor that followed the flush which suffused 
his masked face at the mention of the name of the girl who was to be 
his partner. Yet, as he came forward, with a self control of which one 
would scarcely believe any man capable, he forced himself to utter a 
low "Pleased to know you and to have this pleasure I am sure," after 
which with infinite grace he led her across to the dance hall, where, the 
music already having begun, this man opened the dance in a house that 
he'd sworn never to enter again and with the one woman whom he could 
ever have loved and whom he had vainly tried to persuade himself was 
blotted from his memory forever. 

******* 

Does the story end here ? you ask. Well it might, but if any one 
really cares to know more let him on an off day take a train to Bruton. 
When there let him ask to be directed to the well known law offices of 
Carlton & Seelney, and when introduced to the senior member of the 
firm he will at once recognize the supposed stranger who in stolen 



140 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Colonial attire usurped the role of his present partner and former col- 
lege mate, Richard Seelney, and was reclaimed by the woman who later 
became his wife and by the life in which he was by nature, training 
and birth fitted to take a part and become a leader. He will make 
an interesting story of it, telling how he was once a graduate and then 
a law student at Bruton College, where during his law course, through 
an unavoidable blunder, damning evidence pointed to him as the culprit 
of a misdeed which he was unable to prove to be the result of the actions 
of a fellow student. In a few short days he lost popularity, the friend- 
ship of the Marbery household, with each member of which he was a 
great favorite, and his engagement with Molly Covington, the Presi- 
dent's niece and a frequent visitor at the Marbery home, was a thing of 
the past. This train of circumstances so embittered him that he re- 
fused to return to Bruton and to accept the pleadings of his friends 
who were distressed at the grievous error they had made when the truth 
concerning the unfortunate affair was known. For seven years he 
wasted opportunities and spent most of his small inheritance at the 
races and in traveling wherever his whim led him until, drawn by a 
force he was unable to resist, he returned to Bruton upon that February 
night, which turned out to be the most important of his life. 



A School Girl's Lot 



Maky Butleb. 



Why, when it is so very hard, 

How can we all be good? 
It seems as if we never can 

Do all the things we should! 

At every corner that we turn 

We meet in iron rule. 
"Such things," they say, "are good for girls 

When they're at boarding school." 

Now, it is very terrible, 

As each of us knows well, 
To get up in a cold, cold room 

As you hear the rising bell. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 141 

To Clement Hall at seven-thirty, 

We all run in a flurry, 
Completely dressed, with hair quite smooth, 

As if we never hurry. 

Three "units" must he done each day, 

No matter what the weather; 
And if we keep on at this rate, 

We'll soon be just a feather. 

Another rule, quite hard to mind, 

Is "Lights out one and all" — 
This cry each night at ten o'clock 

Comes ringing down the hall. 

But since I've told this mournful tale 

Of what we do each day, 
I should keep on and tell you how 

We always keep so gay. 

For, in spite of rules, in spite of books, 

That bring with them such sorrow, 
Who would these happy days forego 

When too soon comes "Life's tomorrow"? 



Comparison of Wordsworth's and Shelley's " To a SKylarK' 



Mary Hancock Owen. 



So totally different are the conceptions of Wordsworth and Shelley 
in regard to the skylark that they seem to be picturing two different 
birds. Wordsworth makes of a lark a sage, Shelley idealizes an un- 
bodied joy into a bird, 

Wordsworth loves the lark, for it is to him a connective link between 
man and nature; Shelley loves it, for it embodies for him images of 
beauty and joy. Wordsworth's poem, therefore, is made more inter- 
esting on account of its association with human life ; Shelley's poem 
is beautiful on account of its aesthetic qualities. Wordsworth says: 

Types of the wise who soar, but never roam; 
True to the kindred points of Heaven and Home. 

Shelley says: 

From the earth thou sprlngest 
Like a cloud of fire. 



142 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Furthermore, Wordsworth stays on earth with his lark, he longs not 
for the unattainable ; but Shelley soars with his and longs to be as 
free, as ignorant of pain as it is. Surely, then, he thinks he would 
sing so sweetly that the world would sit and listen. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Susan Pokter Rawlings, Editor. 



Thursday evening, January 11th, Mr. Lay gave us an interesting 
and instructive talk on "Protection Against Fire." He showed us 
various fire extinguishers and told us how to use them, and also told us 
of sundry other methods of putting out a fire. We enjoyed the talk 
very much and expect to profit greatly by it in case we have need of 
such knowledge. 

Miss Thomas's Talk 

One of the most charming and instructive of our Thursday evening 
talks was made by Miss Thomas, January 18th. Her subject was 
"Manners and Customs of the English Language," and she dealt with 
it in her usual interesting manner. She told us how to avoid incor- 
rect English and "slang," and, lastly, "bad language." Every word of 
her talk was thoroughly enjoyed; and we sincerely hope that it will not 
be long before Miss Thomas talks to us again. 

Mr. Lay's Talk 

The regular Thursday evening talk, on January 25th, was made by 
Mr. Lay, his subject being "Excellence." We all feel that this sub- 
ject is far above our heads, and that it will be a long while before we 
attain any degree of excellence; but Mr. Lay told us of many prac- 
tical little things, where we might do a great deal of good by striving 
hard for this virtue. We hope to apply Mr. Lay's remarks to our 
lives here, and become more useful in school. 



The St. Maky's Muse, 143 

Miss Stone's Lecture 

Saturday evening, January 20th, Miss Stone lectured in the Audi- 
torium on "Crete." Miss Stone is the sister of "our" Mr. Stone, and 
she has lived in Greece a good many years. Her lecture was illus- 
trated by the most interesting stereopticon views of Crete. The school 
attended in a body; the girls seemed to enjoy the lecture thoroughly, 
and voted Miss Stone most charming and delightful. 

A Children's Party 

Saturday evening, January 13th, the Muse Club gave a children's 
party in the parlor. Everybody was requested to come costumed either 
as a little boy or a little girl and prepared to play children's games. 
Mary Owen was the "grown up" hostess of the evening, Patsey Smith 
being the honoree of the occasion. After merry games of blind man's 
buff, going to Jerusalem, drop the handkerchief and other time- 
honored amusements, stick candy was given to the hungry children. 
Aside from the jolly time that every one seemed to be enjoying the 
Muse Club realized a sum of money that will be helpful to them in 
their student publications. 

"The Fair" 

One of the most delightful evenings of the year was spent Saturday, 
February 3d, when St. Anne's Chapter of the Junior Auxiliary and 
the Muse Club held a Fair in the old Dining Room. The "Hot-dogs" 
were sold by Mary Owen and Elizabeth Hughes ; the ice cream by 
Laura Clark, Frances Walker, and Mary Smith ; the sandwiches by 
Lina Lockhart, Mary Butler, and Susan Rawlings; the fruit by Patsey 
Smith and Evelyn Maxwell ; the lemonade by Caroline Jones, Beverly 
DuBose, and Laura Margaret Hoppe ; and the candy by Nellie Hen- 
dricks and Myrtle Warren. The booths were most artistically deco- 
rated in ivy and vari-colored crepe paper. It was a jolly party, and 
every one had a thrillingly good time. 

Mrs. Shipp's Reading 

On Tuesday evening, January 30th, the two literary societies met 
jointly in the parlor to hear a reading by Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp. 
Mrs. Shipp had been asked to read one of her own stories, and her 
3 



144 The St. Maby's Muse. 

choice was one of her most charming ones, "Paul Fat," the story of a 
fat little girl named "Pau-Zme/' who had the humiliating nickname of 
"Paul Fat" given her by her teasing playmates. It is very amusing 
and very real, and poor Paul Fat comes out all right in the end 
and triumphs at a children's party by being chosen the prettiest little 
girl there. 

The societies are greatly indebted to Mrs. Shipp, and hope that they 
may have a similar pleasure again this year. 

Deaconess Goodwin's Visit 

Wednesday evening, January 17th, Deaconess Goodwin, of the 
Church Mission's House in New York, arrived at the school to be a 
guest at the Rectory. Mr. Lay presented us to the Deaconess in the 
schoolroom the evening she came and she said a few words to us. 
Thursday night she made the usual talk, her subject being the "Life of 
Service." Her remarks were most applicable to every one, and espe- 
cially to us here at St. Mary's, and we were quite interested in what 
she said. Saturday night she met a number of the girls and offered 
them suggestions as to the auxiliary work. Then Sunday night again 
she met all of the girls and told us more of the "Life of Service." She 
left Sunday night, after having won all of our hearts. We sincerely 
hope that it will not be very long before Deaconess Goodwin pays us 
another visit. 

Miss Luney's Recital 

Those of the St. Mary's girls who were so fortunate as to have been 
present at one of Miss Luney's organ recitals previously, looked for- 
ward with eager expectation to the one of 1912, which was given on 
the evening of January eighteenth. The girls were seated in the 
transept of the Chapel and the pews were filled with Raleigh guests, 
all attesting their keen interest in and enjoyment of the program by 
their careful attention. Miss Luney was assisted by Miss Crafts, vio- 
linist, and Miss Shull, soprano, both of the St. Mary's Faculty, and 
by Dr. Hubert Royster, baritone, of Raleigh. All of these artists had 
appeared before the St. Mary's audience on other occasions, so that 
their numbers on the program were delightful fulfillments of pleasur- 
able anticipation. Even those who are familiar with Miss Luney's 



The St. Maby's Muse. 145 

musical gifts agreed that they had never before heard her play so well, 
her selections showing to perfection her skill and natural instinct as 
an organist and a musician of the highest type. 
The program is given below: 

1. Theme (Varied) in E Flat Faulkes 

Miss Luney. 

2. Nur Wer Die Sehnsucht Kennt Tschaikowsky-Elman 

Miss Cbafts. 

3. The Christ Shelley 

Db. Roysteb. 

4. (a) Le Cygne Saint-Saens 

(&) Gavotte Martini 

Miss Luney. 

5. Aria from Elijah — Hear Ye, Israel Mendelssohn 

Miss Shuix. 

6. (a) Prelude to Lohengrin Wagner 

(&) Military March Schubert 

Miss Luney. 

7. Romanze Converse 

Miss Cbafts. 

8. Ninety and Nine Huhn 

Db. Roysteb. 

9. Concert Overture Faulkes 

Miss Luney. 

Miss Parlow's Recital 

Monday evening, January 29th, the second of the Peace-St. Mary's 
Concerts took place in the St. Mary's Auditorium, given by Miss Par- 
low, the greatest woman violinist of the world. 

Miss Parlow's playing was marvelous and her audience enjoyed her 
to the fullest. 

Her program was as follows : 

1. Devil's Trill Sonata Tartini 

2. Concerto B Minor Saint-Saens 

1. Allegro non troppo. 

2. Adantino quasi Allegretto. 

3. Allegro non troppo. 



146 The St. Maky's Muse. 

3. (a) Air Goldmark 

(ft) Menuett Debussy 

(c) Zephir Hubay 

4. (a) Caprice Viennois Ereisler 

(&) (c) Two Hungarian Dances, Nos. 20 and 21 Brahms- Joachim 

Harold Osboen Smith, Accompanist. 

Miss Tillinghast's TalK 

Miss Tillinghast, who is now teaching the deaf and dumb in Dur- 
ham, paid us a visit Sunday night, February 4th ; and gave us a short 
talk, telling of her work in that town. She spoke on the "Education 
of Deaf Mutes," showing how they are taught to go through all forms 
of the church service; and also how they are made to feel that they 
are a part of this world. Miss Tillinghast showed us the different signs 
used to express the prayers, the creed, and the hymns. It was an in- 
teresting talk, especially as her subject was one which most of us know 
very little about. 

Miss Thomas's TalK 

Thursday evening, February 8th, Miss Thomas told us, in her most 
charming way, of her own visit to Oberammergau and the "Passion 
Play." She described the house in which she stayed, and the enclosure 
in which the play is given ; and then described the play and the charac- 
ters. The talk was thoroughly interesting ; and when Miss Thomas had 
finished, we all felt as if we had had a glimpse of Oberammergau and the 
"Passion Play." 

The Circus 

We were very much surprised and delighted on February 10th when 
we found that Mr. Lay had given his permission for us to go to a "real 
live circus" that afternoon. As a general rule such permissions are not 
granted, but this one was unusual in every respect, since the perform- 
ance took place in the new Auditorium and was under the auspices of 
Colonel Johnson and the proceeds were given to the charity organiza- 
tion of Raleigh. About seventy-five St. Mary's girls went and voted it 
a splendid circus, although there were no lions, pink lemonade or pea- 
nuts. The actors were of interest because the circus originated in this 
State. Three generations of one family were represented in the ring 
and the program was original in every particular. The clowns and 



The St. Maey's Muse. 147 

acrobats were above the average, but the most interesting act was that 
of the girl who sped from the dome of the auditorium to the stage, 
hanging by her teeth. The modern circus is an improvement on the 
old one, in both refinement and interest. A. C. W. 

"An Unlucky Tip" 

Saturday evening, February 10th, a most attractive play was given 
in the Auditorium, for the benefit of the Muse Club. Three of our 
favorites appeared, Kate Smith, Elizabeth Tarry, and Mary Owen, 
and, as always, they were just "perfectly fine." In addition to them, 
we had the pleasure of seeing Elizabeth McKenzie for the first time, 
and she was charming. The play was under the direction of Miss 
Urquhart, and it showed her ability in that direction. 

The program is given below : 

Scexe I. Living room in the Clifford's house. 
Scene II. Dining room in same. 

Time: Morning. 

Cast: 

Mrs. Clifford Elizabeth McKenzie 

Hilary Burroughs, Mrs. Clifford's sister Elizabeth Tarry 

James Clifford Mary Owen 

Frederic Ker Kate Smith 

Rev. Mr. Hunter's Lecture 

Thursday evening, February 15th, was the occasion of a most de- 
lightful and instructive lecture, accompanied by stereopticon views, on 
Switzerland, given by the Rev. A. B. Hunter, of St. Augustine's 
School. 

Mr. Hunter and his wife have traveled in Switzerland a great deal, 
and he told us of how wonderful and charming the country was to them, 
while the beautiful pictures made it even more real. By the time he 
had finished his lecture, we were all talking of going to Switzerland to 
see for ourselves the glories of that country. 

Miss Davis's Faculty Recital 
Miss Davis made her public debut in Raleigh in the St. Mary's 
Auditorium on February 17th. Even those of us in the School who 
knew most of her ability were agreeably surprised at her work in the 
recital. 



148 The St. Maky's Muse. 

The News and Observer said next morning: 

The fifth of the season's series of Faculty Recitals was given in the Auditorium 
at St. Mary's last evening, when Miss Florence Davis, the Director of Elocution, 
appeared for the first time in Raleigh, and delighted the audience with her 
excellent rendition of Israel Zangwill's comedy, "Merely Mary Ann." 

Mary Ann, first maid of all work in a London lodging house and in the last 
act changed by a turn of fortune into the wealthy young mistress of an English 
country estate, is a charming character, and Miss Davis interpreted her charm- 
ingly. The plot of the play centers in the heroine, but there are ten other 
characters appearing in the four acts, and Miss Davis handled them all ably and 
appreciatively. The lines are good and were well rendered, and throughout the 
hour and twenty minutes required for the reading the interest was fully sus- 
tained, a high tribute to the reader's ability. 

The comedy was a good instrument for displaying Miss Davis's versatility as 
an elocutionist, and she used it very skillfully. Those who heard her will look 
forward with very pleasant anticipation to her next appearance. 

The program was as follows: 

"MERELY MARY ANN." 

A Comedy by Israel Zangwill. 

Dbamatis Persons: 

Mr. Lancelot A young music composer 

Mr. Peter, his friend A wealthy young man in business 

Herr Brahmson A music publisher 

Rev. Samuel Smedge A country vicar 

Mrs. Ledbatter A lodging house keeper 

Rosie Her daughter 

Lady Chelmer A poor peeress 

Lady Carolyn Countess of Foxwell, her friend 

Lady Gladys Foxwell The Countess's daughter 

Lord Valentine Foxwell The Countess's son 

Mary Ann The maid of all work in Mrs. Ledbatter's lodging house 

Act I. The scene is laid in the hallway of Mrs. Ledbatter's lodging house 
in London. 

Act II. Several months later. Mr. Lancelot's sitting room in Mrs. Ledbat- 
ter's house. 

Act III. The same scene a week later. 

Act IV. Six years have elapsed. The scene is laid in the reception room at 
Mead Hall, now the home of Mary Ann. 

School Notes 

School has opened again with several new girls. They are Helen 
Hartridge and Winifred Rogers from Jacksonville, Florida; Bessie 



The St. Maky's Muse. 149 

Sasser from Bowden, ET. C. ; Mary Conger and Anne Fagan from 
Edenton ; Virginia Gregg from Salisbury, who was a student here two 
years ago, and Lady Harris, who was here part of last year. 

Frances Bottum, Margaret's sister, who was here several years ago, 
has returned to graduate. 

We regret very much that Willie Willis, Shepherd Leak, Lily Bern- 
hardt, and Lloyd Bond did not return to school after Christmas. 

Elizabeth Morris will be late in returning on account of sickness. 

Olive Smith has the sympathy of the entire school on account of the 
death of her mother. She was called home January 10th. 

We are glad to welcome Mary Tyson back in school and are glad to 
see that she has entirely recovered from her recent illness. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year ■ ■ ■ ■ One Dollar. 

Single Copies ■ a ■ = m Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1911-1912. 

Patsey Harry Smith, Editor-in-Chief. 
Nellie Hendricks, Mary Hancock Owen, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart, Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Evelyn Cameron Maxwell, Susan Porter Rawlings. 

Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon, Business Manager. 
Caroline Clarke Jones, As3t. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



Facta Non Verba 

How easy it is to tell any one how to do a thing ; how infinitely diffi- 
cult to demonstrate by your own actions just the right way a particular 
task may be successfully accomplished. Virtues in the abstract make 
very beautiful ideals and high flown speeches and ornate poetry abound 
in them ; but of much greater value in this world of realities are prac- 
tical applications than the most eloquently delivered theories. 

Charles Lamb professed to believe that man was out of his element 
when at work — being by nature fitted for the' contemplative life. 
Browning, on the other hand, declares that life is active, and, when we 
come to consider the thing, do we not wish to share our lives with liv- 
ing proofs of this last rather than with passive adherents of the former 
statement ? 

Life may be but "a sleep and a forgetting," but concerning life there 
is certainly one unchanging truth, for as you give so shall you receive, 
which is only another way of saying — as you work, so shall you enjoy. 
There is no more comforting thought than to know that the normal 
person who labors most earnestly will have a capacity for enjoyment 
far exceeding that of the man who makes no use of his capabilities or 
the resources he has at hand. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 151 

So, when preparing oratory of flowery eloquence to move admiring 
hearers to undertake great things, let us suppress such grandiloquence 
whatever the effort called forth in doing so, get the "great things" done 
by doing them ourselves, and thus inspire others to do likewise. 

Be an active producer of the world's goods rather than a selfishly 
passive receiver of bounties which you have not deserved. 



The Lenten Services 



The Chapel Services Dubing Lent. 

Holy Communion: First and Third Sundays in the month at 11:00. Other Sun- 
days at 7:50 a. m. Saints' Days at 7:00 a. m. 

Sundays: Morning Service at 11:00; Evening Service at 5:00. 
Morning Prayer: Mondays at 8:00; other days at 8:30. 
Evening Prayer: Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30. 
Special Lenten Services: Shortened Evening Prayer with Address: Wednesdays 
and Fridays at 5:30. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN-CLIPPINGS 



Twr 

Mr. Wr. wooed Miss Phr. 

And he kr. 
When Miss Phr. left, then Wr. 

Kr. sr. 
Then Miss Phr.'s haughty sr. 

Slapped bold Mr. Wr. — 
Mr. Wr.'s cheek now wears a 

Painful blr. 



Nature Stories 
Algy met a bear; 
The bear was bulgy; 
The bulge was Algy. 

Percy thought the lion cute; 
He went too near the stage; 
And so was Persecuted. 



152 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Yet Are Ali^e in Their Limitation^ 
Who first called a woman "a cat" 

Was neither observing nor nice; 
There's a very wide difference, I'm sure, 

In the views that they hold about mice. 

Of course, both are purring and soft, 
And alike they will scratch you, but still 

A woman can't run up a tree, 
Nor a cat up a milliner's bill. 



Explanatory Paraphrase 
Much valuable literature is almost unread today on account of its obsolete 
phraseology. We have attempted to elucidate some of the most famous of these 
classics, in order that they may be read and loved as they deserve by every child 
who knows his letters. — Ed. 

Minute Miss Muffet placed herself on an 

Irregular terrestrial excrescence, 
Meantime did she regale her appetite 

With Borden's white coagulated essence. 

A fierce arachnid of ungainly mien 

Descended near her on his dangling thread. 

Our heroine evacuates the scene, 

Affrighted by the rampant octoped. ; 



Study Hall 
If x plus y are 46, 

And the moon don't shine all day, 
And sixty minutes make an hour, 

And May Day comes in May; 

If I am tired as tired can be, 
And gold is found in a rock, 

How long do you suppose 'twill be 
Before it's nine o'clock? 



Oddities of the Great 

Such was the attitude of Julius Caesar toward tobacco that not one cigarette 
was smoked in Rome during his entire lifetime. 

Abraham Lincoln would never set foot in an automobile. 

Napoleon Bonaparte would not have a telephone in his house. 

Although several times elected to the Senate, Cicero would not be seen in a 
frock coat at even the most formal sessions of that body. 






The St. Maey's Muse. 153 

So great was his dislike for electrical contrivances of all sorts that George 
Washington would not even use the telegraph to transmit news of the Yorktown 
victory to Congress. 

Nero, fond as he was of music, refused to allow a phonograph or self-playing 
piano to be brought into Italy during his long reign. 

Christopher Columbus pointedly omitted all mention of Roosevelt's name in 
his report of famous Americans he had met. Nor could he be induced to visit 
New York. 



Hoot and Toot Hottentot 
If a Hottentot taught a Hottentot tot 
To tot ere the tot could totter, 

Ought the Hottentot tot 

To be taught to say "aught" 
Or "naught," or what ought to be taught her? 

Or— 

If to hoot and to toot a Hottentot tot 
Be taught by a Hottentot footer, 

Should the footer get hot if the Hottentot tot 
Hoot and toot at the Hottentot tutor? 



Lines to a Crush 
thou, my Crush! Being beloved afar, 

Loveliest of all the maids that meet my view, 
What word breaks from thy lips, my guiding star, 
Addressed to thine adorer fond — 
"Skidoo!" 

Rapturous I gaze upon thy charms and sigh, 
"Thy slightest word upon my heart is writ. 

Dost love me in return? Reply, reply, 
Angelic one!" And echo answers, 
"Nit!" 



Lithpth 

Thuthie and Thaddie and Thethelia were thitterth! Thuthie wath thad and 
thober. Thaddie wath theerful and thmiling. Her thitherth thought the wath 
thilly. 

And one day Thethelia wath walking home from thurth with Thamuel Thimp- 
thon, and Thuthie and Thaddie were thitting on the fenth thwinging their 
thlipperth. 

Then Thuthie and Thaddie thaid, "Oh, Thethelia, why do you thmile tho 
thilly?" 

But Thethelia kept on walking with Thamuel Thimpthon, and Thuthie and 
Thaddie are thill thitting on the fenth. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - < Mrs. I. McK. Pittcnger, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham. 

President .... Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem. 



EDITORIAL 



The Raleigh Chapter's Alumnae Play 

The very successful production of Bernard Shaw's comedy, "You 
Never Can Tell," under the auspices of the Raleigh Chapter of the St. 
Mary's Alumnse, is not only of value and importance in itself, but even 
more so as showing the possibilities to other Chapters. 

It may be taken for granted that every Alumnse Chapter would like 
to do all in its power to further Alumna? interests ; the cause for inac- 
tion is found in the difficulty of finding a workable plan. It would 
seem that the Chapter Play might furnish this workable idea to a num- 
ber of Chapters and prove not only a means of helping along the Schol- 
arship Fund but of awaking a greater interest in Alumnse and Chapter 
affairs. In almost a score of the Carolina towns conditions are as favor- 
able for a successful carrying out of this idea as in Raleigh, if not on 
the same scale yet with the same spirit. 

There are two requirements at the outset — the hearty support of the 
plan by the Chapter, and the finding of the Chapter member who will 
manage the plan and carry it out, and the second is the more important. 
The Raleigh Chapter had just the person for the work in Miss Annie 
Root, the Chapter President, and other Chapters are indeed fortunate 
if they possess members with the ability, the energy and the persistence 
of Miss Root, but every Chapter should have at least one member who 



The St. Mary's Muse. 155 

would shoulder the responsibility and bring success to the undertaking. 
For the work is worthy of the worker. 

Let no chapter mistake. Miss Root was very fortunate in having 
Mr. Owen to give his no small talent as Stage Manager and Director 
to the Raleigh production, in being able to gather an exceptionally 
talented company of amateur actors, and in having the energetic and 
effective help of a number of her fellow-alumnae in attending to the host 
of details involved in planning for, advertising and arranging the play, 
but the all-important element that pervaded everything was work. 
Every one worked and worked hard, and the result was success. The 
actors felt repaid, the assistants felt repaid, the manager felt repaid, 
the audience was highly pleased, and the Scholarship Fund is $200 bet- 
ter off as a result of the work. 

Why not have echoes of the Raleigh success from the Alumnae in 
other places this spring? The Scholarship Fund has remained almost 
dormant the past two years. Most of the original pledges are paid up 
and yet the total amount available is not more than $2,500 of the $6,000 
required. We have rested on our oars now for two seasons. Can we 
not all pull together for a further steady advance forward toward the 
goal ? And do it now. 



Alumnae News 

The Alumnse are ever welcome at St. Mary's, and it is our wish and 
hope that each "old girl" will try to make it a part of her life to return 
to her Alma Mater sufficiently often to feel at home here and to keep in 
touch with present day matters. Many of the Alumnae are very good 
about returning and their visits give great pleasure. 

Miss Harriet Bowen, '96, of Jackson, E*. C, was here for the State 
Teachers' Assembly in November. She is an enthusiastic teacher in 
the Jackson schools and an enthusiastic member of the Assembly. Dur- 
ing the session of 1904 she was a teacher at St. Mary's. Her sisters, 
also all of them St. Mary's girls, are all in Jackson this winter — Miss 
Ellen, Mrs. C. G. Peebles (Julia Bowen), Miss Josephine, who taught 
for several years at Fassifern, and Miss Bland. 



156 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Miss Mildred Cuningham, '00, of Madison, was also here for the 
Assembly, and earlier, brought her cousin, Lucinda Martin, to School in 
September. 

"Ida Rogerson," of Edenton, and "Mary Shuford," of Hickory, grad- 
uates of '10, and too well known to St. Mary's girls to seem other than 
of them, paid one of their very pleasant visits to the School just before 
the holidays. They "ran" the Muse in their Senior Year and were 
high in student favor and dignity, and their visits are events. On 
leaving St. Mary's Miss Rogerson accompanied Miss Shuford to her 
home for a brief visit, and Miss Shuford is now spending the later 
winter with relatives in Philadelphia. 

"Minnie Leary," of Elizabeth City, also of the Class of '10, was 
here for a day in January. She taught up to Christmas and is now 
making a round of visits. Many old friends were glad to welcome 
her back. 

The School lost one of her very best friends among the Alumnae in 
the death in Florence, S. C, in January, of Miss Mary Emma Tarrh. 
Miss Tarrh, a St. Mary's girl of the '80's, kept up her active interest in 
everything connected with the School to the very last. Though she had 
been a great sufferer from rheumatism for several years her death at 
the time was quite unexpected. 

The lastest addition to the missionary workers in the domestic field 
has been Miss Anna Barrow Clark, '95, of Scotland Neck, who resigned 
the principalship of the Scotland Neck Schools at the beginning of this 
session to teach in the schools of Spray, N. C, and assist in the work 
of the mission there among the mills. 

"Rebe Shields," '10, of Scotland Neck, who is this year assisting Miss 
Pixley in the Music Department of Fassifern, at Lincolnton, writes 
very enthusiastically of her work there and of the school. She stopped 
at St. Mary's on her way to Fassifern and hopes to be with us for 
Commencement. 

The Rector recently enjoyed a very pleasant visit to Charleston, 
S. C, at the meeting of the Men and Religion Forward Movement, and 
while there had a very pleasant call on Mrs. McNeely DuBose, who is 
this winter at the Porter Military Academy as Matron. Mrs. DuBose 



The St. Maky's Muse. 157 

bas St. Pierre and St. John with her, and Rainsford is still at school 
at Fairmount, Monteagle, Tenn. McXeely DuBose, Jr., is in his 
Senior Year at the A. & M. College in West Raleigh, and is an assist- 
ant in Electrical Department. 

"Eugenia Woodruff" ('04-05) and "Del Burbank," of Wilmington, 
spent a day with Miss Eugie's sister, Jennie, at St. Mary's in January, 
and "Mary Seddon," of Portsmouth, Va., stopped in to greet her friends 
on the first Sunday in Lent. 

Mrs. Kate Hawley Bacon ('98) and Miss Mary Hull McKimmon 
were guests for luncheon at St. Mary's on January 31st. 

Miss Bessie Arthur made a short visit to St. Mary's February 2d and 
3d, as she passed through Raleigh on her way to Union, S. C, from 
Harrisonburg, Virginia. Miss Arthur was a student here for several 
years, 1910 being her last, so there are many girls here who, as her 
schoolmates, were especially glad to welcome her. 



The Raleigh Chapter's Presentation of "You Never Can Tell " 

"YOU NEVER CAN TELL." 

A Comedy in Four Acts, by Bernard Shaw. 
Cast. 

Furgus Crampton Mr. King 

Bohun, Q. C Mr. Brawley 

Finch McComas Mr. Culbreth 

The Waiter Dr. Horton 

Valentine Mr. Nestor 

Philip Clandon Mr. Orr 

Parlor Maid Miss Grey 

Mrs. Clandon Miss Urquhart 

Dolly Clandon Miss Haskins 

Gloria Clandon Mrs. Satterfield 

Scenes. 
Act I. Dentist's operating room in London. 
Act II. Terrace at the Marine Hotel. 
Act III. The Clandon's sitting room in the Marine Hotel. 
Act IV. Same, in the evening. 
Dramatic Manager — Mr. R. Blinn Owen. Business Manager — Miss Annie Root. 



158 The St. Maky's Muse. 

The production of "You Never Can Tell" at the Academy of Musie 
in Raleigh on the night of February 20th was the most satisfactory 
Chapter entertainment in years. The play had been well advertised 
and an excellent audience greeted the company, which acquitted itself 
exceedingly well. The comedy is one of Shaw's best, which means that 
it only required adequate interpreters to insure its success, 'and the 
actors, individually and collectively, were equal to the occasion. 

Miss Haskins, of Peace Institute, as Dolly, and Dr. Horton, as the 
Waiter, were special stars, while Mr. Nestor, as Valentine, the "five 
shilling dentist" and wooer of Gloria, and Mrs. Satterfield, as Gloria, 
the "twentieth century maiden," carried off trying parts very success- 
fully. The fun making of the "twins," Dolly and Philip, was very real 
and a very essential part of the play, and Mr. Orr ably seconded Miss 
Haskins in it. And Mr. Culbreth, Mr. Brawley and Miss Grey did 
their lesser parts very acceptably. Of course the personal interest of 
St. Mary's girls, and they were there a hundred and fifty strong, was 
centered on Miss Urquhart, of the Faculty, and Mr. E. H. King, of 
"the Little Store," and they thoroughly appreciated them in their parts. 

The merchants of the city had cooperated in showing their good will 
in a very actual way by furnishing practically all of the ladies' cos- 
tumes and hats, some of them prepared especially for the occasion, and 
they made a very satisfactory display. The Boylan-Pearce Company, 
the McKimmon Dry Goods Company, the French Hat Shop, the 
Royall & Borden Company, the Dobbin- Ferrall Company, Cross & Line- 
han, and the Office Stationery Company joined in this display of cour- 
tesy and good will. 

The giving of the play was the idea of Miss Annie Root, '03, the 
President of the Raleigh Chapter, who brought it before the Chapter at 
the Founders' Day meeting when it was endorsed by the Chapter. Miss 
Root was in full charge of the arrangements and the chief credit for 
the success is due her. Mr. R. Blinn Owen, of St. Mary's, acted as 
Dramatic Manager, and added to his already high reputation in that 
direction. The members of the Chapter cooperated with Miss Root, 
wherever possible, throughout the arrangements and in the attending to 
the final details Mrs. W. W. Robards, Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank and 
Miss Sarah Cheshire were especially active. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 159 

The boxes in the theater were decorated with St. Mary's banners and 
pennants and were occupied by the patronesses of the occasion — all 
prominent members of the Alumnae and of the Chapter: Mrs. A. B. 
Andrews, Mrs. F. H. Busbee, Mrs. Jas. Boylan, Mrs. Jos. B. Cheshire, 
Miss Jennie Coffin, Mrs. Delia Gray, Mrs. Iredell, Mrs. R. H. Jones, 
Mrs. A. W. Knox, Mrs. W T m. Little, Mrs. Bessie S. Leake, Mrs. Geo. 
Lay, Mrs. John W. Hinsdale, Miss Kate McKimmon, Mrs. W. A. Mont- 
gomery, Mrs. Annie H. Ruffin, Mrs. Chas. Root, Mrs. Geo. H. Snow, 
Mrs. W. E. Shipp, Mrs. V. E. Turner. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Bellamy— Bridgers 

Mrs. Preston Louis Bridgers 

announces the marriage of her daughter 

Lucy 

to 

Dr. Robert Harlee Bellamy 

on Thursday the twenty-eighth of December 

one thousand nine hundred and eleven 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

Hairs ton — George 

Mrs. Thomas Morduit Nelson George 

requests the honor of 

your presence at the marriage of her daughter 

Margaret Elmer 

to 

Mr. Peter Wilson Hairston 

on the evening of Wednesday the seventeenth of January 

at six o'clock 

at St. James's Church 

Marietta, Georgia 

Huntley — Davis 

Mrs. James C. Davis 

announces the marriage of her daughter 

Minnie Rieger 

to 

Mr. George William Huntley 

on the nineteenth of February 

nineteen hundred and twelve 

Beaufort, North Carolina 



160 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Wohlford — Emery 

A marriage which was a surprise to the friends of the bride and 
groom was that of Miss Margaret Rebecca Emery, daughter of Mr. J. H. 
Emery, and Mr. Herbert William Wohlford. It occurred Thursday 
night in Concord at seven o'clock. Rev. W. H. Ball performed the cere- 
mony in All Saints' Episcopal Church, of which he is rector. Miss 
Nellie Picard and Messrs. Charles Bowers and Joe MacKay accompa- 
nied him to Concord Thursday evening, and the party returned that 
night. Mr. and Mrs. Wohlford are at the Leland. 

The bride is a young woman of unusual attractiveness and vivacity. 
Eor the past two years she has been a student at St. Mary's School, Ra- 
leigh, where she was exceedingly popular. Mr. Wohlford is a grandson 
of Capt. and Mrs. A. Thies, of Myers Park, and is highly regarded and 
a promising young man. He is manager of the order department of 
John M. Scott & Co., wholesale druggists. — From the Charlotte 
Observer. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



" It's worth the difference " 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography" 



The memory of our gradutes, 
As they leave to join the rest, 

Still may linger with us 
By their initials on the desks. 



THE OOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES MP SLIPPERS 



THEBOYLAN-PEARCEGO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery 
Tailored Costumes 
Gloves, Hosiery 
Handkerchiefs 
Fancy Goods 
Underwear 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly 



FAYETTEVIL'LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N". C. 



Advertisements. 



Herbert Rosenthal 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES* TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 


LADIES' FINE SHOES 


131 Favetteville Street, 




Raleigh, N. C. 


INSURE IN THE 

Jefferson Standard Life Ins. Go. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 


COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 


Strongest in the South 


122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOYS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



'Shall I brain him?" said the Soph., 
And the victim's courage fled. 

'You can't; he is a Freshman. 
Just hit him on the head." 



NORFOLK 

OYSTE RS 

DAILY 

Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St. Both Phones 356 


J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 






HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 






ROBERT SIMPSON 

DRUGGIST AND PRESCRIPTIONIST 


H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 

For Toilet Requisites and 
Colds Drinks 


OOOT) THTNOS A17WAYS AT 


BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 


EAT 
BETTS' ICE CREAM 


RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 

105 Fayetteville St. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, R. S. BTJSBEE, 

Secretary. General Manager. 



A man in the city of Sioux 

Called on a young widow he knioux: 

"Mrs. Weeds," said he, 

"How happy I'd he, 
If you would take me for number tioux." 



Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 
Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



t. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



FOR QUICK COOKING NOTHING 
EXCEEDS THE 

GAS RANGE 

Always Ready. No Dirt. No Ashes 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Welsbach, "The Light that Does 
Not Flicker." 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

8 West Martin Street. 



Advertisements. 



DARNELL & THOMAS 
Music House 

Established 1887 

Pianos, Organs, Small Instruments, Sheet 
Music and Instruction Books 



Raleigrh, 



North Carolina 



MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 
OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital 1100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturer of Greek Letter Fraternity 

Jewelry, 213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 

Factory: 213 Little Sharp St. 

flfS^Memorandum package sent to any fraternity 
member through the Secretary of Chapter. Special 
designs and estimates furnished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic meets, etc. 




CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 



Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones 



■{ 



174 
226 



THE HOTEL RALEIGH 

INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 



When the donkey saw the zebra 

He began to switch his tail; 
"Well, I never!" was his comment, 
"Here's a mule that's been in jail." 



K I N'G ' S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

INSURANCE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE 
Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 
THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 



SEND TO 

Plummer's Stables 

For Riding and Driving Horses 
YOUNG & HUG HES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. PULLEN, 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Advertisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson F. H. Brigos 




PRESIDENT CASHIER 


•■MWL-Jin JH jq;}& >aamr>' 


THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round steps bank" since 186.5 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 


^jjj^ 


THOS. H. BRIGGS&SONS. Raleigh, N. C — 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 


St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N C. 


Jolly &■ Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 


WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 


117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 






DR. F. D. CASTLEBURY 

DENTIST 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 


AYCOCK & WINSTON 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW RALEIGH, N. C. 


safely Headache in all its forms. 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 


C. E. HARTGE— ARCHITECT 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 




MRS. FRANK REDFORD-MILLINERY 
13 West Harnett St Phone 632 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


10% off to Faculty and Boarding Pupils 


SHOES 


Dr. D. E. EVERETT 

DENTIST 


12 East Martin Street 
PEEBLES & EDWARDS 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 


DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON 

DENTIST 

116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 






HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 






J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY- GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

22 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Books and Stationery 

113 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 






It will wpII pay you to buy your Ready- to- Wear 
Garments at our store because we sell better goods 
for less money 
THE FASHION 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 


GREEN & WATSON 

Art Store 

11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 


WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 

Phone 953-R 

217H Fayetteville Street 






Why Is Brantley's Fountain the Most Popular? 
ASK THE GIRLS 


N. H. MOORE 

Repairer of Fine Shoes 

Fayetteville Street 


ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 


MISS SMITH 

DRESSMAKER 

Fayetteville Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 


SALVATORE DESIO, who Is now located at 
at his new store. 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th St?., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 


T. W. BLAKE 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware 
Repairing promptly done 


watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Claps pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 


DR. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 





C f~\ 






ru&T \c\\X 



Location Central for the Carolina*. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



70th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1911. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1912. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's f *- TUB MUJ5IG SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these ) & THE BbSI?i ESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: I ^ THE ART SCHOOL. 

J 5. THE PREPARATORY' SCHOOL 



In 1911-12 are enrolled 250 students from 10 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention lu the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

Fur Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Reetor. 



%\)t 



&t. jWarp's Jffluse 



Jflarcf), 1912 



® 



ftaletsl), it C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

LENTEN NUMBER. 
Vol. XVI. March, 1912. No. 7 

A Lenten Thought 



Prances R. Bottum. 



In the midst of our busy day let us pause for a moment and give 
another thought to the season of Lent. 

First of all, when we think of Lent, each asks of herself "What can 
I give up during these forty days ?" And then we decide upon the 
sacrifice of other pleasures in which we indulge from day to day. We 
also resolve to use a part of our time in attending the afternoon Lenten 
services. These things we do as a matter of course. We know, but 
often lose sight of the fact, that in making small sacrifices voluntarily 
one may learn to make greater ones strongly and completely when called 
upon. But above all, let us make our self-denials lovingly, that is, let 
us strive for the spirit of self-sacrifice which comes with prayer, intro- 
spection and repentance. 

In the words of Wm. Wordsworth: 

Give unto me, made lowly wise, 

The spirit of self-sacrifice; 

The confidence of reason give; 

And, in the light of Truth, thy bondman let me live. 



162 The St. Mary's Muse. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



NELLIE HENDRICKS and MARY HANCOCK OWEN, Editors. 



Bines' Valentine Party 



Anna Cowan Strong. 



He couldn't go to the old party! He just couldn't do it — and he 
wouldn't! 

Considering how he hated parties, it looked as if people would not 
insist on giving them — and even if they felt that they had to do a 
thing like that, why they might at least not invite him. 

Why were parties, anyway ? Binks dug his grimy little hands 
deeper into his short brown hair and pouted and pondered. Purely 
and simply to worry the souls of small boys ! And what were they ? 
Giggling little girls with curls and pink and blue ribbons, grumpy little 
boys in starched suits, and silly games, and pink ice cream and cake. 
Everybody knows little boys are much nicer in rumpled suits than in 
starched ones — they're so much more comfortable. And Binks loathed 
all little girls. And he didn't particularly care for pink ice cream and 
cake. All of that misery was in just a plain party, like you had any 
time. This party was different. Mother had read from the little red 
heart that came through the mail that it was to be a Valentine party. 
Oh, the horrors of such a party ! It meant all the little girls running 
after the little boys for kisses, and if there was one thing Binks hated 
more than girls it was kisses. It was shameful to be kissed bv a little 
girl. The boys never forgot anything like that and he — well he 
couldn't go. 

Maybe he could talk to mother about it some more. Maybe he could 
reason with her about it. But then Binks remembered how nice she 
had seemed to think it was, how lovely it was, and how she had said 
that he mustn't miss such a good time. Good time, indeed ! He was 
not of that opinion. You never seemed to be able to tell about mothers, 
anyway. They thought all parties were lovely and hated billy goats — 



The St. Mary's Muse. 163 

called them "ugly brutes." Fathers were indeed more sensible when it 
came to such things. Mother must not love him very much if she 
always made him do what he didn't want to. In fact, she must not love 
him a bit. And Binks began to feel exceedingly sorry for himself. 

There was mother in the door now. She did look at him as if she 
loved him, even if down in her heart she really didn't. She was pretty, 
too, Binks thought. She was much prettier than anybody else he knew. 
Her eyes were so twinkley, and her hair so soft and gold and — . But 
wasn't she speaking to him ? 

"What's my boy thinking so deeply over ? Stop looking so growly 
and come kiss your mother and tell Jane to dress you for the party." 
Kiss ! Jane ! Party ! Binks' heart, if possible, sank lower than 
before. He walked down the steps and dug his toes in the gravel 
"Mother," he said, "If I was your mother and you were my little boy, 
I wouldn't make my little boy go to a party — to a Valentine party." 

"But, dear," broke in mother. 

"And," continued Binks firmly, quite disregarding the interruption, 
I-m-m not going!" 

"Binks !" Mother looked perfectly astounded. 

"I'm not!" said Binks, carefully avoiding her eye. "I'm not! and 
I'm not ! So there !" 

"William Randolph Justice, do you realize what you art saying, and 
to whom you are saying it ?" (Mother's voice sounded dreadfully 
queer — didn't sound that way hardly ever.) "Come into the house 
immediately and go to Jane." 

Binks shied a pebble at the steps and went. When they called him 
anything but silly names like "Wee Willie Winkie," or "Billy Binks," 
or just plain "Binks," he generally went. But all the way up stairs he 
muttered : "I won't go to the old party — I won't !" 

It did seem as if Jane would never get through with him. He knew 
she was taking twice as long as she generally did. Perhaps she and 
mother were trying to — but no ! Even if mother didn't love him he 
didn't believe she'd treat him' that way. 

At last ! Jane was really through with him. And as he strolled down 
stairs to wait for mother he saw the carriage out in front, of the house. 



164 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Of course lie had been forbidden to go near the horses by himself — had 
been, as he remembered "expressly forbidden." And he went out into 
the yard. But that looked like — yes, he was sure there was something 
hanging undone from Prince's head, and he shouldn't think it ought to 
be left like that, because James was a slow man sometimes, and Binks 
couldn't see him anywhere. He knew how to do it, and it was easy to 
do, and he guessed he'd better fix it himself. Prince's eyes did roll 
sometimes and James had to pull the horses hard when they met a car, 
but — A little nervously he reached for the strap. Prince rolled his 
eyes at sight of this unsual thing, and then jerked his head back and — 

Oh dear ! His arm felt so queer ! ! And what was that awful smell- 
ing stuff ! And that big lump on the side of his head ? And could that 
be mother in a heap by his side ? He'd see. 

"Mother." She raised her head. "Mother, I'm sorry, but I — I 
don't guess I can go to the party, now," he said. 



Past and Present 



Patsey H. Smith. 



O, the brave old days of long ago! 

When chivalry was at its height; 

When men wore love-locks, plumes, and lace, 

And jeweled swords with hilts so bright; 

When gallants donned their baldrics bold 

For fierce bouts in the duel field, 

Their chief ambition e'en to fight 

Where'er there was a cause to right, 

In the brave old days of long ago. 

O, woeful days of modern times! 

When fashion's rule is at its height; 

When maids wear bought locks, plumes, and lace, 

And hats so big and skirts so tight; 

When matrons leave their homes awry 

To woo fame in the suffrage field, 

Their chief ambition "woman's right," 

No matter what the chaotic plight, 

In these woeful days of modern times. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 16i 



The Testing of Miguel 



Frances R. Bottum. 



There is a story told that when the great and good Padre Junipero 
Serra came, after a long and arduous "journey to our country to teach 
Christianity to the peaceful Indians of the Pacific coast, an Indian child 
was brought to him to be baptized. The Padre, standing by a rude 
wooden cross, planted in the hard barren ground, was naming the child 
"Miguel." But a strange fear suddenly came to the parents of the 
child and rushing from a near-by clump of sage brush, whither they had 
retreated for shyness, they snatched the child from the gentle Padre's 
arms and disappeared. 

Twelve years later Miguel came back to Father Serra, and, instead 
of the wooden cross he saw a great "Mission," a chapel with bells that 
rang every hour, a wall with long arched corridors within, that enclosed 
many acres of land, a whole village of low red tiled and adobe huts 
where Indian men and women worked and lived together with the Padre 
who taught them the ways of white men. 

Here Miguel had come to live and work, first grinding beans and corn 
with the women, later tending the goats, making brick, or journeying 
with the men off to the mountains for logs of wood from which new 
rafters for the sanctuary were to be carved in fantastic design. Most 
of the Indian boys were naturally indolent, but Miguel applied himself 
diligently to every task that was given him. 

Xothing escaped the notice of Father Serra, who, seeing Miguel's 
industry, wished to reward him befittin2.lv. He therefore taught him 
to copy many books and to read ; he began to have hopes that Miguel 
would became a learned man and a priest as no one from the Peaceful 
tribes had ever done. Miguel loved the Padres and seemed to wish to 
become even such a man as Father Serra himself. 

Xow it happened that there came to the Mission from Spain a friend 
of Father Serra's, a tall young man with the most wonderful long cape 
of lace and velvet that Miguel had ever seen. They called him Don Jose 
and I think his last name was Bandini. Mia*uel soon became friendlv 



166 The St. Mary's Muse. 

with Don Jose, for the Spaniard loved to tell many stories of the splen- 
dor of the court in Spain, and of the learning of the wise men. 

After many weeks it came time for Don Jose to return to Spain. 
One day Father Serra called Miguel to him and said: "My son, Don 
Jose leaves the mission tomorrow. You are to go with him. By dili- 
gence in study and by uprightness in conduct you will become a great 
man. In Spain you will learn many things and will, in four years, 
return to teach your people." So it was that Miguel, after making 
many sincere promises to the old Padre, was taken by the magnificent 
Don Jose in a great ship to Spain. 

A year passed, a long hard one for Father Serra. No news had come 
from Spain. Supplies and more skilled workmen were needed to estab- 
lish other missions in the north. Finally one winter day an Indian 
brought the Padre word that a great ship was lying at anchor in the bay. 
The Padre accordingly had all things ordered in readiness for the 
arrival of guests, and hurried to the shore to welcome the newcomers. 

In small boats the strangers came to land, a few were gay in costly 
attire, a few soldiers in glittering armor, some artisans and many sail- 
ors who were busy unloading the cargo. A sumptuous feast was held at 
the old mission that night after the benediction and many curious 
adventures were related. 

Timidly Father Serra inquired for news of Miguel. The merry 
laughter and talking went on and no one heeded his question, and no 
one noticed when Father Serra left the gay company to seek elsewhere 
for word of Miguel. Out into the moonlight he went, meeting no one, 
hearing nothing but the sounds of revelry and the weird songs of a 
group of Indians and sailors. Past the sheep fold he went, past the 
great adobe ovens, out to a round arched entrance in the wall. Standing 
within the. arch, gazing outward over the valley toward the ocean, was a 
stoop-shouldered, dejected looking figure. "My son !" quietly ex- 
claimed the Padre. Miguel, for he it was, turned toward him, his face 
cast always downward, daring not even so much as to lift his eyes, "O 
Father Serra ! Take me back ! Great sickness came, great wishing for 
friends, and I return, for I was much afraid" — 

"Come," said the Padre, shortly, " 'Tis not long before morning, 



The St. Maky's Muse. 167 

when you must go tend the goats/' and with the firm energetic steps of 
a strong man he strode off in the direction of the dying sounds of revelry. 
Miguel, with his countenance downcast and full of shame, followed fal- 
teringly. At the door of a quiet dark room the Padre halted and sigh- 
ing turned slowly toward the Indian and said, "Come, child, and sleep 
while you may." And the next day, satisfied, Miguel returned to caring 
for the goats. 



The Monthly Muse 



Elizabeth Hughes. 



A modest little Muse am I, 

Not like the ones of old, 
Who, when invoked by man or maid, 

Were often wont to scold. 

But just a happy messenger 
I'm sent the country through, 

To search for old acquaintances, 
Our friendship to renew. 

My verse and stories give them joy; 

They find out even more, 
For with great care I tell them news 

Of girlhood friends of yore. 

When thus I win the hearts of all, 
I promise monthly meetings; 

But if, dear friends, I'm not on time, 
Be sure of later greetings. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Susan Porteb Rawlings, Editor. 



The Thursday Afternoon Recitals 
Soon after work gets under way each fall the regular recitals given 
by the Music pupils are begun, and are given every Thursday after- 
noon throughout the year. All pupils in the Music Department must 

2 



168 The St. Mary's Muse. 

attend these recitals and before the year is out practically all of them 
have taken part in the recitals. The ones held this year have showed 
some good work and have been very interesting. The program of the 
recital which was held on the 29th of February is a typical one, and is 
given below. 

1. Witches Dance Schytte 

Georgia Fuller. 

2. Barcarolle Ehrlich 

Susan Rawlings. 

3. Danza Chadwick 

Olivia Smith. 

4. Danse negre Cyril Scott 

Elizabeth Tarry. 

5. Quartette, Rosary Nevin 

Misses Brigham, Blakeley, Gilbert, and Erwin. 

6. Arabesque Schumann 

Ada Burfoot. 

7. Couple Valsante Poldini 

Flora McDonald. 

8. Spring Song Ellmenreich 

Nancy Lay. 

9. Revery Francheux 

Dorothy Budge. 

10. Madrigale Simonetti 

Marion Pickel. 

11. Burgmuller. 

Ellen Lay. 

12. Les Mytes— Waltz P. Wachs 

Fannie Miller. 

13. Praeludium and Toccato Lachmer 

Sarah Fenner. 

14. Slumber Song Gurlitt 

Annie Bowen. 

15. Etude Wollenhaupt 

Eleanor Mann. 

Statistics 
Great excitement always prevails on the occasion of the annual "tak- 
ing of statistics" and this year was no exception. The friendly contest 
ended with the following choice : 

Handsomest — Amy Winston. 
Most Popular — Patsey Smith. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 169 

Most Attractive — Amelia Sturgeon. 

Best Dancer — Mary Polk McGeh.ee. 

Most Amusing — Susan Rawlings. 

Wittiest — Mary Owen. 

Most Athletic — Jeannette Bruce. 

Most Pessimistic — Ruth Rosser. 

Most Optimistic — Kate Smith. 

Most Talented — Elizabeth Tarry. 

Prettiest — Amelia Sturgeon. 

Most Coquettish — Mary Polk McGehee. 

Most Sentimental — Margaret Erwin. 

Daintiest — Patsey Smith. 

Most Sincere — Margaret Erwin. 

Best Student — Mary Butler. 

The Annual Inter-Society Debate 
The exact date for the annual debate between the Sigma Lambda and 
the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Societies has not yet been determined, 
but it will be about the middle of April. The Sigma Lambda debaters 
will be Lina Lockhart, '12, and Mary Butler, '13, while Epsilon Alpha 
Pi will be represented by Patsey Smith, '12, and Mary Owen. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



Mary Gaither and Elizabeth Winslow were welcome visitors at the 
school during the first week of Lent. They were both at St. Mary's last 
year, so found numbers of old friends who enjoyed their visit thor- 
oughly. 

Liluer Beal paid a short visit to the School on the 5th. She was only 
here for dinner, and a very small part of the evening, but it was a great 
pleasure to have her with us again. 

Mrs. Margaret Busbee Shipp and her sister, Mrs. McBee, spent the 
evening of the 5th at St. Mary's. Mrs. McBee was at one time in 
charge of the preparatory classes at St. Mary's, but has been for some 
time associated with her sister, Miss Kate Shipp, at Fassifern. 

Master Carol Lamb Maim, Jr., and his mother ("Miss Cribbs") spent 
a day at St. Mary's recently. Lie was greatly appreciated and admired 
and we hope he cared enough for us to come again soon. 

Irwin McGee enjoyed a visit from her mother recently. 



170 The St. Mary's Muse. 

We extend a hearty welcome to Marion Alston, the "new girl" from 
Texarkana, Tex.-Ark. 

Mary Lamb has enjoyed a short visit from her sister, Olivia, during 
the month. 

On the evening of the 19th Georgia and Lorna Hales paid a short 
visit to the school, which was very much enjoyed. They are both at 
home in Wilson this year and are finding "out of school life" very 
pleasant. 



Life 

Life is lovely to the lover, 
To the player life's a play; 

Life is but a load of trouble 
To the man upon the dray. 

Life's a picture to the artist, 
To the rascal life's a fraud; 

Life, perhaps, is just a burden 
To the man beneath the hod. 

To the musician life's an echo 
Of the "last trump's" welcome blast. 

When we'll drop all work and worry 
And will have our rest at last. 

To the preacher life's a sermon, 

To the joker life's a jest, 
To the miser life is money, 

To the loafer life is rest. 

To the man upon the engine 
Life's a long and heavy grade; 

It's a gamble to the gambler, 
To the merchant life is trade. 

To the one who writes the romance 

Life's a story ever new; 
Life is what we try to make it — 

Brother, what is life to you? 



The St. Mary f s Muse. 



Subscription. One Year = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies = s = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at .St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 1911-1912. 

Patsey Harry Smith, Editor-in-Chief. 
Nellie Hendricks, Mary Hancock Owen, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart, Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Evelyn Cameron Maxwell, Susan Porter Rawlings. 

Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon, Business Manager. 
Caroline Clarke Jones, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



The Petition of the Poetryless 



The plight of Richard III on Bosworth field when he vehemently 
cried, "A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse !" was trite indeed as 
compared with that of the Muse when in very anguish of soul goes up 
the cry, "Some poems, even one poem, all Musedom for some poetry !" 

Is it possible that those who do not know, picture the Muse Board 
as an august body that meets monthly, whose members sit around a 
table in the Muse room with intellectual brows unpuckered and in the 
course of an hour or two turn out with utmost ease stories, sketches, edi- 
torials, and — poetry ? Perish such a picture if it ever existed in the 
mind of any. If the Muse is not poetical it is in very fact most truth- 
ful, and therefore must confess that the aforementioned Muse Board 
is a group of poor, harassed mortals who, with infinite difficulty, grind 
out monthly stories and editorials and humbly beg from others articles 
and sketches beyond their capability to produce. 

So when any of you toss the Muse aside and are about to say, "What 
a publication — not a line of poetry except what was written and pub- 
lished years ago in old Muses," stop a minute, call before you the 



172 The St. Maky's Muse. 

stooped shoulders and wan face of a Muse Board member sitting until 
the last light flash, trying to write even a simple couplet and change 
your words into ''the Muse never has any poetry ; it is a shame ; I be- 
lieve I'll try to write some poetry." If you will then suit the deed to 
the intention and write comic, serious, iambic, lyrical, blank verse, any 
kind of verse you will long be remembered and your name will be writ- 
ten along with those other wonderfully inspired contributors who have 
soared to the heights of poesy, mountain peaks at present seemingly 
unattainable, no matter how valiant or how oft repeated the attempts. 



Colonel John P. Thomas 



Such is the affection that all of us feel for Miss Thomas that a grief 
to her is in the nature of a personal grief to us, and it is with this feel- 
ing that we sympathize in the death of her father, which occurred at 
the end of a long illness at the home of her brother, Mr. John P. 
Thomas, Jr., in Columbia, S. C, on February 11th. 

Colonel Thomas was seventy-nine years of age and nine children sur- 
vive him, of whom our Miss Thomas is the voungest. Colonel Thomas 
was in turn educator, gallant Confederate soldier, and editor, and was 
also distinguished as a historian and scholar. 

Aside from our knowledge of Miss Thomas we could hardly fail to 
be interested in this appreciation of Colonel Thomas by Mr. W. H. 
Gibbes. of Columbia, published in the Columbia State the day after 
Colonel Thomas' death : 

He was my preceptor in the days of my youth, and, next to the influence of 
my father and mother, that of Colonel John Peyre Thomas has kept me from 
being a worse man than otherwise I should have been. 

Never have I known any man to stand truer to a high standard of duty than 
he who died today. As editor of the Register, he was told by the proprietor 
only to be quiet and let Tillmanism be advocated by other pens than his and 
that he might hold his position, but he refused. 

As Superintendent of the Citadel he might have kept silence while allowing 
the discipline of that institution to be subverted, and have held a lifetime office, 
but he would not. 

As a man he might have evaded personal debts to the loss of his creditors, 
but he would not. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 173 

He might have bowed the knee to wrong, have yielded the place of right, 
have compromised his standard of principle, have gained high place and power 
and pelf by practical methods considered legitimate according to the standards 
of men, but he would not. 

Everywhere about his native State and those adjoining have I heard this 
verdict rendered by men he taught at the Arsenal, the Carolina Military Insti- 
tute, and the Citadel, and never have I heard a contrary one by any human 
being who ever knew him. 

Could he have had his way, some years ago he would have gone to his grave 
"like one who wraps the drapery of his couch about him and lies down to 
pleasant dreams." 

That he has done so today is at length as he would have wished it. God 
rest him! 

On December 24, 1909, I sent him these lines in a poor endeavor to cheer the 
heart of the living man and not wait to lay the wreath upon his tomb: 

If I perchance were called upon to name 
One man I knew who stood four-square always, 

Who held his honor dearer than his fame, 
John Peyre Thomas is the name I'd say. 

What more? Could any language add 

A title to a character so clean, 
That held as odious all he knew was bad 

And through all ill or wrong kept right serene? 
Patriot, scholar, gentleman, fare thee well! 



The Lenten Addresses 



The Lenten addresses on Wednesday and Friday evenings have been 
well attended and the Hector's addresses both interestine; and stimulat- 



es 



mg. 



The subjects were as follows 



Wednesdays: The Responsibilities and Opportunities of Women Under Pres- 
ent Day Conditions. 

1. Introductory. Adaptation to the New, and Conservation of the Best in 

the Old. 

2. Social Duties as Members of Society. 

3. Social Duties as Citizens. 

4. Woman's Influence on Men. 

5. Mental Training. 

6. Vocation: Need of a Definite Aim in Life. 



174 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Fridays: Responsibility for One's Self. 

1. Working Out One's Own Salvation, Physical and Spiritual. 

2. True Self-confidence. 

3. Self-control. 

4. Self-approval. 

5. Selfishness, or, Being a Servant of All. 

6. Our Ultimate Dependence on the Grace of God. 



The Muse Club 



This is the third year of the Muse Club under its present organiza- 
tion, and in many ways has been a very successful one. In addition to 
publishing the monthly and the annual Muse the Club seeks to take an 
active interest in anything that concerns the happiness or the develop- 
ment of the student life at St. Mary's, and while its influence is only 
indirect it can make itself felt in the right direction. 

In order to keep the organization from becoming unwieldly its mem- 
bership was limited three years ago to twenty-five, chosen on account 
of seniority or activity in student affairs. The members of the Club 
this session are Patsy Smith, '12, Chairman Elizabeth Hughes, '12, 
Secretary; Frances Bottum, '12; Margaret Bottum, '15; Margaret 
Broadfoot, '12 ; Ada Burfoot, Mary Butler, '13 ; Beverly DuBose, '14 
Margaret Erwin, Nellie Hendricks, '12 ; Laura Margaret Hoppe, '14 
Ellen Johnson, '15 ; Caroline Jones, '13 ; Kathryn Blount Lassiter, '14 
Lina Lockhart, '12; Evelyn Maxwell, '13; Fannie McMullan, '12 
Mary H. Owen, '13; Susan Rawlings, Zona Shull, Amelia Sturgeon, 
Myrtle Warren, '14; Bessie, White, '14; Amy Winston, '14, and Jennie 
Woodruff, '14. 

It looked until Christmas as though it would be advisable to suspend 
the publication of the annual Muse this year, but a very effective stu- 
dent activity at the eleventh hour has made the publication possible and 
practicable and the Muse Board is now hoping to have ready a very 
attractive publication by the middle of May. The group pictures taken 
by Tyree on Monday, March 18th, struck every one as especially effect- 
ive and promise much for the book. E. C. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 175 



With the Literary Societies 



The Sigma Lambda, and the E. A. P. societies have been much 
more active than usual of late — the stirring element naturally being the 
choice of the debaters for the annual inter-society debate, and the selec- 
tion of a subject for debate. The debaters were chosen at the last meet- 
ing in February, and are for the Sigma Lamba, Lina Lockhart and 
Mary Butler ; for the E. A. P., Patsey Smith and Mary Owen. Both 
societies are very proud of their "teams," and both are confident of vic- 
tory. 

The selection of the question for debate is proving a difficult one. 
This year it is the task of the Sigma Lambda's to present the subject, 
which the E. A. P.'s may accept or reject, with the privilege of choos- 
ing either positive or negative for their side. The subject which is now 
before them is, "Resolved, That in the field of secondary education ex 
tensive studies are more beneficial than intensive ones." At present the 
decision is still pending as to whether this be accepted for debate. 

At the meetino- of the E. A. P. societv on March 7 a short and in- 
formal debate was held, evidently to get the girls interested in debate 
again, before the annual one in April. The subject was a serio-comic 
one : ''Resolved, That the St. Mary's girl is more of a society girl than 
a student," the affirmative being represented by Emily Marriott and 
Agnes Reese, the negative by Xellie Hendricks and Margaret Bottum. 
The debaters entered into the spirit of their subject and their arguments 
both serious and satirical were fully appreciated. The decision was in 
favor of the negative. The meeting for the 11th of March was planned 
and it was decided to have an Edgar Allan Poe evening, which was to 
include a sketch of Poe's life, the recitation of the Bells by Patsey 
Smith, of the Raven bv Emilv Marriott, and a reading from Poe bv 
Margaret Erwin. 

The Sigma Lambda's meeting on the 7th was of special interest, as it 
was the occasion of the presenting to the society of the program of 
work for the rest of the year. This program is in the form of a very 
attractive booklet, bound in gray, with violet lettering, the society 
colors, and is the first attempt by the St. Mary's Literary Societies to 



176 The St. Mary's Muse. 

present a formal program in permanent shape. It was all the more 
interesting to the members of the Society because the program commit- 
tee had kept the matter of the booklets a complete secret from the other 
members of the Society. The committee is to be congratulated on their 
good working program and on the originality of their idea. 



The Auxiliaries 



The work of the seven branches of the Junior Auxiliary has been 
very encouraging this year. Besides the individual dues of the mem- 
bers, the chapters have realized the money for their assessments by 
selling sandwiches and ice-cream. Under Miss Thomas's directorship, 
St. Katharine's Chapter presented "Mrs. Jarley's Waxworks" in the 
Auditorium. 

Through Mr. Lay's invitation, Deaconess Goodwin came to visit the 
school for a few days. Her charming personality, her enthusiasm 
in the possibilities of missionary work, made her delightful talks of 
the "Usefulness of Life" all the more inspiring. 

Another visitor of missionary interest was Miss Tillinghast, of 
Durham. Her short address was about her work among the deaf 
mutes at the schools in Morganton and in Durham. She made us real- 
ize more than ever the dependence of these afflicted people upon the 
help of others, and encouraged us to be on the lookout to give any needed 
aid in our power to those deaf mutes in our own communities. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN— CLIPPINGS 



Caroline Ash Lockhart, Editor. 



A little bird sat on a telegraph wire, 
And said to his friend, "I declare, 

If wireless telegraphy comes into vogue, 
We'll all have to sit in the air." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 177 

There was a young lady of weight 
Yv^ho loved to lean long on the geight; 

When a young man she knew 

Was a-leaning there ktew, 
She was in a heavenly steight. 

Mrs. New-wed called in the old Dr., 
For the baby had tantrums that Shr., 

Said the stern old M.D.: 

"It is quite plain to see, 
The infant is spoiled, 'cause you've Rr." 



Canny 
A canner exceedingly canny, 
One morning remarked to his granny, 
A canner can can anything that he can, 
But a canner can't can a can, can he? 



The Ostrich 
The ostrich is a silly bird, 

With scarcely any mind; 
He often runs so very fast 

He leaves himself behind; 

And when he gets there has to stand 
And hang about till night, 

Without a blessed thing to do 
Until he comes in sight. 



familiar Lines 
(Arranged so that the Freshman can always remember them.) 

The boy stood on the burning deck, 

His fleece was white as snow; 
He stuck a feather in his hat, 

John Anderson, my Jo. 
"Come back, come back!" he cried in grief, 

From India's coral strand. 
The frost is on the pumpkin, 

And the village smithy stands. 
Ye banks and braes o' bonny Doon, 

Across the sands o' Dee. 
Can you forget that night in June, 

My country, 'tis of thee! 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumme Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

("Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - ■< Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 

President .... Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

Secretary ... - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem. 



EDITORIAL 



Alumnae Day 



It is time for the Chapters and the Alumnae generally to be thinking 
about plans for the observance of Alumnae Day, May 12th, which this 
year falls on a Sunday. This May 12th will be the 70th anniversary 
of the opening of St. Mary's. 

The Alumnae Association constitution appoints two days each year 
as the special days for meetings of the Alumnae: Founders' Day, No- 
vember 1st, and Alumnae Day, May 12th. It was further contemplated 
that the Founders' Day meeting should be more of a memorial meeting, 
in harmony with the thoughts of All Saints' Day with which it is coinci- 
dent ; and that the Alumnae Day meeting should be more social, perhaps 
where advisable taking the form of a light Alumnae luncheon with in- 
formal after-luncheon talks. This plan has been carried out very suc- 
cessfully at St. Mary's the past two years and it is hoped to have an 
equally pleasant gathering of the Raleigh Alumnae at the School this 
Alumnae Day. 

In those places where a luncheon celebration or other like meeting 
can be held the celebration of the day will, of course, be held on Satur- 
day or Monday ; where something even simpler is planned the meeting 



The St. Mary's Muse. 179 

might well take place after one of the services on Sunday. But what- 
ever the arrangement we hope that the meetings will be held wherever 
it is possible to arrange for them. 



Alumnae Notes 



St. Mary's girls of the early 80's are reminded of the flight of time 
by the announcement of the marriage on February 17th at Christ 
Church, Colon, Panama, of Miss Olive Elizabeth Marshall and Mr. 
Courtenay Tew Lindsay. Mr. Lindsay is the son of "Ella Tew," '79, 
Mrs. Win. E. Lindsay, of Spartanburg, S. C, ever one of the most 
loyal of the St. Mary's daughters. 

*7T 7T "3f 

The Rector's series of Lenten talks on "Woman's Part in Present 
Day Life," in the first of which he called attention to the diversity of 
her activity in the present suggests a thought of examples among the 
Alumna?. We have been long accustomed to the success of St. Mary's 
girls as mothers, as teachers, as missionaries and church workers, even 
as successful stenographers and office assistants, but we see them now 
gradually settling into other less usual lines of usefulness. 

Louise Evans (Bus., '04) who moved from Wilmington to Warren- 
ton, Va., after her school days, has been for several years a dealer in 
real estate and notary public, and is now trying her hand as editor and 
manager of a weekly newspaper, the Fauquier Democrat, and very suc- 
cessfully, too. 

Jean Carson ("04-'05) formerly of Spartanburg, S. C, who aspired 
in her school days to be an actress, has been content the last several 
years to become the manager of one of the fashionable tea-rooms on 
Fifth Avenue, ISTew York. 

Ellen Gibson, '06, who has been teaching for some years in the 
schools of her home town, Concord, N\ C, tried even a greater novelty 
last fall as the author of a "moving picture play," which all St. Mary's 
girls who are moving picture lovers would doubtless like to see. 



ISO The St. Mary's Muse. 

Susan Iden ('03-'04) of Raleigh, has been for a long time and is still 
the Society Editor of the Raleigh Times. 

And the list could be lengthened indefinitely. 

* * * 

Mrs. A. B. Andrews, of Raleigh, who, as "Julia M. Johnston," of 
Charlotte, was at St. Mary's in the War days, has lately presented to 
the School through Miss Annie Root, the President of the Raleigh 
Chapter, an interesting drawing of the Chapel, made by one of her 
classmates. The drawing shows the Chapel looking much as it did from 
the time of its erection until its reconstruction in 1904, but the trees, 
the little fenced-in yards on either side, and the boardwalk leading to 
the Main Building all are unfamiliar. The drawing is dated June 8, 
1864, and Mrs. Andrews says in presenting it: "Elsie Liddell (we 
called her Lizzie) hurriedly drew this picture of 'the Chapel' and gave 
it to me as I was going home from school (when illness prevented my 
returning)." The drawing is now hanging in the "Sitting Room" in 
East Rock, where are also hung the "Stage Coach" picture, and the 
photographs of the Bishops, and of the Lady Principals, pictures which 
all St. Mary's girls like to look at on their visits to the School. 

* * * 

His many friends at St. Mary's have sympathized with Dr. Richard 
H. Battle in the illness which has kept him in his house most of the 
winter and rejoice with him at the improvement in his health which 
will enable them soon to have him with them again. Dr. Battle has 
been ever such a familiar figure in the social and official life of the 
School, has been ever so ready with help of every kind that we miss him 
even in a brief absence. His sisters were among the first girls at St. 
Mary's ; his wife and his daughters were educated here ; and as a mem- 
ber of the Trustees and of the Executive Committee he is always in 
close touch with us. Dr. Battle is also the author of the best historical 
sketch of St. Mary's that has yet been written. It will be a great 
pleasure to welcome him again at St. Mary's. 

* * * 

The Senior Class and St. Mary's generally is very glad to welcome 
back to the active ranks Frances Bottum, now of Asheville. She had 
almost finished her course here in 1909 when she left St. Marv's to go 



The St. Mary's Muse. 181 

with her family to their new home in California. There she spent parts 
of two years at the San Diego Xormal School, recognized as one of the 
best of its kind in the country, and her family havina returned east she 
now comes back for the spring term to finish her work here and gradu- 
ate with the Class of '12. Her drawings haye added much to the Muse 
in former days and will doubtless help to make more attractive the 1912 
annual Muse. It would seem that Miss Frances left St. Mary's peo- 
ple far behind when she went to California, but to her surprise and 
pleasure at San Diego she found herself welcomed as coming from St. 
Mary's, the alma mater of Miss Annie Moore. '95, who was for years a 
valued member of the San Dieao faculty. Miss Moore, after leavina 
St. Mary's, took her doctor's dearee at Cornell, tauaht with much sue- 
cess in the west, and is now residing in New York City, where she 
devotes herself to writing. Her book, The Physiology of Man and the 
Lower Animals, which is dedicated to her class at San Dieao, is used as 
a text-book at St. Mary's. Dr. Moore is a member of the Xew York 
Chapter of the St. Mary's Alumna?. 

Frances Bottum's return for graduation recalls the last similar case, 
that of Elizabeth Waddill, in 1908, ever one of the most faithful of the 
Alumna?. She was forced to leave school in the middle of her Junior 
year on account of her health and spent a year in Newark, X. J., but 
with constant energy kept up with her course and returned in the spring 
of 1908 and graduated with much credit. She at present lives with her 
brother at her old home in Cheraw, S. C. She also helped the Muse 
much, both with pen and pencil, and thought of her recalls recalls her 
neat response to the Rector's last Christmas greeting, which escaped 
publication at the time. The younger Alumna? will remember that the 
Hector the past Christmas worded his greeting thus : 

The old year's end, the birthday of the new, 
Brings grateful retrospect, and vision hopeful 
of the coming year. 
The past shines jeweled with a host of friends 
To whom I homage pay and wish them, every one 
fair Christmas cheer. 

May New Year's dawn bring health, prosperity, and peace, 
And each glad day be brighter as thy days increase. 



182 The St. Mary's Mtjse. 

which Miss Waddill acknowledged thus : 

Your little card, so Christmas-y, 

With its message, sweet and cheery, 
Helped mightily, my thoughtful friend, 

To make my Christmas merry. 
And had I but the poet's gift, 

Denied me by the fairies, 
I'd write a great big shining wish, 

To you and dear St. Mary's. 
Yet, even tho' I'm not a poet, 

I wish just lots of cheer 
For you, for yours, and for our School, 

Throughout this glad New Year. 

* * * 

All "St. Mary's folks" appreciate the good fortune of the St. Mary's 
girls, past and present, who are to have the pleasure of a European trip 
this summer with Miss Thomas to chaperone them. Those in the party 
which sails June 12th are Sarah Wilson, of Charlotte ; Bessie and Mar- 
garet Erwin, of Durham ; Mildred and Julia Borden, of Goldsboro ; 
Amy Winston, of Kaleigh ; Mary Louise Manning, of Durham, and 
Bessie Arthur, of Winchester, Va., all St. Mary's girls of the past few 
years. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 

Dry Goods of all kinds, Tailored Costumes, 
all kinds of Fancy Goods 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Acts of courteous men remind us 
We can shop with them some more, 

And, departing, leave behind us 
All our pennies in the store. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OK ALL KINDS 



MILLINERY 



*5$i$€!€««- 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



' It's worth the difference " 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



"Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO.. 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 


127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


Insurance Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 


The Mechanics Savings Bank 


COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOTS 
PICTURES STATIONEEY 



Impatient Susie 

"Oh, I can't thread this needle, ma," 

Was little Susie's cry; 
"Just as the thread is going through, 

The needle winks its eye." 



NORFOLK 

OYSTE RS 

DAILY 

Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St. Both Phones 356 

HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 

Good Things Always at 

BRETSCH's BAKERY 



J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 

Ladies' Fine Shoes 



Advertisements. 



WHY IS 

Brantley's Fountain 

The Most Popular? 

ASK THE GIRLS 

POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 
105 Fayetteville St. 

CARVER'S STABLES 

HARNESS AND SADDLE HORSES 
Phone 229 117 E. Davie St. 



KIXG-CRO WELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 



CHAS. E. JOHNSON, 
President. 

G. H. DORTCH, 

Secretary. 



A. A. THOMPSON, 
Treasurer. 

R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



I think it ill becomes a Man — 
(Though he be sorely swat), 

Because his house has blown away, 
To grumble at his Lot. 



1 ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON <ft HARGETT STS. 




Advertisements. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King'Crowell 
MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 

OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital $100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. \V. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO. 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



C. E. HARTGE 



Architect 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 

Both Phones:-^ 2 2fi 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 

ICE 

CREAM 

Phone 123 Cor. Salisbury & Hargett Sta. 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all makes repaired 



"One night I had a funny dream," 
Said little Tommy Drew; 

"I dreamed that I was wide awake, 
And woke and found it true." 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. PULLEN 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fike Insurance and Investments 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 

JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 



THE HOTEL RALEIGH 

INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 



ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 



Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson 

PRESIDENT 



F. H. Briqgs 

CASHIER 

THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round steps bank" SINCE 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 

Jolly &- Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 
Garments at our store because we sell better goods 
for less money The Fashion 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE~ 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 




THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS. Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY— GROCERIES 

best of everything in our line 
222 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C . 



When the donkey saw the zebra, 

He began to switch his tail; 
"Well, I never!" was his comment, 
"Here's a mule that's been in jail." 



WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 

Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C 

Dr. V. E. TURNER 

D E N T I 8 T 

Dr. M. C. HORTON 

DENTIST 

GREEN & WATSON Art Store 
11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
217H Fayetteville Street Phone 953-R 



N. H. MOORE 
Repairer of Fine Shoes E. Hargett Street 

BRIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

DR. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 

dr. ernest h. broughton, dentist 
116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 



DARNELL & THOMAS 



MUSIC HOUSE 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 

GYMNASIUM SHOES 

CARDWELL'S 

ALL KINDS OF CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 



Advertisements. 



H. 



STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. O Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders'solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new Jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



St. Mary's Calendar, 1912. 

April, 1912. 

March 31, Sunday. Palm Sunday. Bishop's Visitation for Confirmation. 

April 5, Friday. Good Friday. Holy Day. 

April 7, Sunday. Easter Day. 

April 10-11, Tuesday-Wednesday. Music Festival in the Raleigh Auditorium. 

April 13, Saturday. 

April 15, Monday. Peace-St. Mary's Concert. 

April 20, Saturday. Freshman Play. 

April 22, Monday. Certificate Recital. Miss Sarah Fenner, Piano. 

April 27, Saturday. Lecture: "Mark Twain." Prof. Archibald Henderson, of 

Chapel Hill. 
April 29, Monday. Chorus Concert. 

May, 1912. 

May 1, Wednesday. May Day Exercises. 

May 4, Saturday. 

May 6, Monday. Certificate Recital. Miss Emilie Rose Knox, Violin. 

May 9, Thursday. Peace-St. Mary's Concert. 

May 11, Saturday. 

May 12, Sunday. Alumnas Day. Seventieth Anniversary of the Opening of 

St. Mary's. 
May 13, Monday. Alumna? Day Luncheon. 

Certificate Recital. Miss Susan Rawlings, Organ. 
May 16, Thursday. Ascension Day. Holy Day. 
May 18, Saturday. Orchestra Concert. 

May 20, Monday. Diploma Recital. Miss Zona Shull, Voice. 
May 25-28, Saturday to Tuesday. Commencement Season. 



THE DEMOCRAT 

TENNESSEE'S GREATEST NEWSPAPER 

Accurate Market Reports All the World's Happenings 



NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



Location Central for the Carolina*. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C 

(for girls and young women) 



70th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1911. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1912. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Martfs \ 2 - THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these &• THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: j j. THE ART SCHOOL. 

{ 5. T 



THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1911-12 are enrolled 250 students from 10 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



Sfje 




t 0luxy 




■ l £ t 



Sptil, 1912 



■^ 



Ealeigt), fl. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

EASTER NUMBER. 
Vol. XVI. April, 1912. No. 8 

Easter Eve 



IBM A DEATON, '10. 



All was at peace within the cloister walls, 
No footstep echoed through the silent halls; 
The monks lay sleeping, waiting till the dawn 
That should bring in the blessed Easter morn. 

But sleep came not to Brother Anselm's cell, 
Into his soul no holy quiet fell; 
Upon the floor the good man knelt and prayed: 
"0 Lord, show me Thy light: — I am afraid! — 
I grope in darkness — guide Thou my feet! 
And may I better know Thee, and more sweet 
Find Thy communion! Grant to me this night 
Thy peace, that in the Easter morning's light 
Joyfully I may worship with the rest 
Of these, my brethren, whom Thou hast so blest." 

Even as he prayed the dim walls 'gan grow bright 
And all the room was filled with silent light; 
And in the midst of the bare cell stood One 
In shining white, Whose face was like the sun, 
And Anselm could not look upon that Pace, 
But bowed him low, and humbly prayed for grace. 

Then spoke the Saviour in a low, sweet voice 
That thrilled the monk, and made his heart rejoice. 
"Anselm," He said, "thy praise is sweet to Me, 
And when thou prayest upon thy bended knee, 
Thy prayers like incense-perfume rise to Heaven; 
No sweeter praise than thine to Me is given 
Within these walls. But, Anselm, know that thou 
Canst praise me better; listen and learn how. 



184 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Out in the world which thou hast left for Me, 
Lives many a one who longs for such as thee, 
To comfort him and cheer him on life's way. 
And for My sake I bid thee go today 
To those who know not of their risen Lord, 
And tell to them the message thou hast heard. 
Go, and in going thou shalt find that light 
Which thou hast asked of Me in prayer tonight." 

Still meekly bowed, in humble voice and low, 
Anselm replied, "Obedient, Lord, I go." 

Then all was dark, and Anselm went to rest, 
Knowing that in that night he had been blest; 
And waking when the Easter morn rose bright, 
He prayed, "0 Lord, I thank Thee for Thy light." 



The Tail of an Easter Chicken 



Margabet Rosalie DitBose. 



[ This story, by " Margaret DuBose," '05 ( Mrs. Isaac T. Avery, of Morganton,) was written for the 

1905 Easter Muse.] 

As father Rooster always said, ma was a specihen of the higher edu- 
cation of women, and that came near being the death of this poor chick. 
When she was quite young she went to a grand University called Incu- 
bator, and she has spent the rest of her life forcing us to live up to the 
many ideas she caught there (and to judge from their number, she 
must have spent all her time catching them). Our first day of life 
(there were only thirteen, of us) was made miserable because she said 
at her "dear old Alma 'Bator, chickens were fed on the most hygienic- 
nutritious-albuminous food stuff, mixed in a tin platter," and we should 
begin life properly. After scratching in the sand for a "tin platter," 
father admitted that he had never seen nor heard of one, and didn't 
believe such things grew in our part of the country, so he brought us 
some delicious fat earth-worms, which "filled the bill" in every way. 

Soon after that, ma said she believed in woman's rights, and why 
shouldn't hens crow as well as roosters, anyway ? She tried it once 
right out in the public Barnyard Square, and old Uncle Rastus threw a 
rock at her and swore he wouldn't have "no hens a-tryin' to ac' lak roos- 



The St. Maey's Muse. 185 

ters 'roun' him, no sah-ree-bob!" That awful threat quieted her until 
the next day, when she decided that it was time for us to begin to study 
Botany and Garden Classics. We were all studiously examining the 
roots of the new-planted green-peas when Uncle Rastus came in sight. 
"Har she is, sah ! de most perniciest and high-falutinest hen what ever 
I seed ! You kin hab her, sah, fo' yo' Easter doins, and de unlucky 
thirteen chicks fo' mos' nothin' !" Then followed an awful time, the 
bare mention of which causes tears to stream from my eyes. ISTot to 
dwell on the harrowing story, we were all dumped into a wagon and 
taken to the front of a store. The window we were in was covered with 
horribly clean sand, and though you could see into the street there was 
an awful thing that bumped your head when you tried to get out that 
way. Soon a horrible man came in with a big basin. He grabbed me 
and was just about to plunge me in, when I gave a desperate squeak, 
kick and wiggle combined, reached the floor and escaped by the opening 
at which he came in. Free at last ! But thoughts of ma and the others 
led me back in front of that fatal window, and what do you think I 
saw there \ 

In place of the twelve fluffy little yellow brothers and sisters I had 
left behind me, were so many brilliant green, blue and red balls, with 
beady eyes, — and "Diamond," the baby of the family, was blue on one 
side and red on the other. Mother must have thought she was back at 
her beloved Incubator, for she was giving the chicks our old familiar 
lesson of walking gently, by putting the toes down first and counting 
ten between each step. All of a sudden my eyes caught this horrible 
sign, and the meaning flashed over me, "Diamond Dyes"! What! 
"Diamond," our pet ! the brightest of us all, to die ! And before she 
was a week old ! My only hope lay in finding father Eooster, so I ran 
like mad down the street. I had an awful fright once when I came to 
an open field where some boys were playing ball, and one called out, 
"Foul !" Now, I knew he meant me, (for mother used to call father a 
"fowl" when she was very mad with him) ; but I ran all the faster. At 
last I found a nest right up on a porch, but it looked so homelike that I 
just had to crawl into it. Then for the first time I chanced to smooth 
my beloved tail, and, to my horror, I found it was a bright red ! Just 
like "Diamond" ! Perhaps "Diamond" will die from that awful bright 
color, and then I would, too. So thinking, I sobbed myself to sleep. 



186 The St. Mary's Muse. 



I thought I had died and entered the chickens' paradise, when the 
next morning the softest little hand touched me and the sweetest little 
voice said, "O Muvver, Santa Claus has brought me a truly live Easter 
chicken, with a very Easter tail ! Can't I keep it always ?" 



The Old Mahogany Table 



Maey Hancock Owen. 



The sturdy little American boy rested his arms on the table and 
swung his fat, brown legs to and fro. On the table he saw the dull 
reflection of his head, and to this he talked as the image of whatsoever 
his imagination provoked. 

On this occasion, as often, the image was that of Alec Davidson, the 
first possessor of the table. Now Alec Davidson, the boy's many times 
great-grandfather, had been a coward. The boy's father had told him 
of how, long, long ago in Scotland he had been afraid to die for his clan 
and had let man after man stand in front of him to be killed instead of 
himself marching bravely to the foe. 

Then, as if to have a cowardly ancestor were not bad enough, he, too, 
had to be a coward. How many times had he heard his mother, a crank 
about heredity, say, "What your forefathers are you will be," and 
pointing to him add, "My boy, you see, has inherited in him all the 
qualities of his Scotch ancestors." Wasn't she ashamed to say it? 
Wasn't she ashamed for them all to know he was a coward ? How ter- 
rible, through very ignorance and loneliness, are the troubles of 
childhood. 

"You coward, you mean old coward," he sobbed to the image, "it's 
your fault I'm afraid of the dark, it's your fault I'm a coward. You 
wouldn't even be sorry if I'd die." Yet he kept the shameful secret to 
himself. 

It was at school that the shameful thing befell him. Bob Watson, 
known to the big boys as "Bully" and to the little ones as "Sir," had 



The St. Mary s Muse. 187 

passed a note up the line, which the teacher had seen just as the boy 
had clumsily thrown it across the aisle. Poor boy ! he knew what Bob's 
revenge would be. After school he saw Bob coming across the campus 
toward him. With the start of the campus, the boy turned and ran; 
ran as fast as his short, fat legs could carry him without even looking 
behind, until he was safe at home. 

At lunch he didn't even want dessert. Mother tried to make him 
tell what was the matter. She even asked him if he had a pain. But 
he gave her no satisfaction; he was waiting for father to come home 
that afternoon for perfect sympathy. There are some things a fellow 
can only tell a man. 

The next day, he started to school ten minutes earlier than usual. 
He and father had talked it over and there was but one way. Bob was 
there, early as usual, to welcome all the little boys with a leer. At 
the sight of the early comer, he started quick for him. The boy seemed 
to see through a haze, his fists shot out once, twice; the third time he 
hit something soft. He had tasted blood and an animal's love of the 
fight surged in him. He hit, scratched, clutched. Then found him- 
self on his face eating dirt, with two strong hands around him. But 
stronger hands pulled the "bully" off and set the boy on his feet. 

"You better go home and get your bruises rubbed with liniment and 
that eye washed before it swells any more." 

His mother saw him coming up the street and ran to the gate to 
meet him, but he slid past her and went on into the dining room to 
the table. 

"You coward," he said to Alec Davidson, "you coward, don't you 
dare call me a coward, or I'll fight you black and blue. I'm no coward." 



188 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Two Serenades 



Patsey Harry Smith. 



The night was fair in its glory, — 

Ah! that was long ago, — 
And beneath a maiden's window 

A youth sang soft and low. 
He played his guitar gently, 

The music could scarce be heard, 
But the maiden who listened above him 

Caught every soft-breathed word. 

The serenade — it was Schubert's — 

Ah, that was long ago! — 
And a red rose fell from the window 

To the singer who stood below, 
Who strummed then a wild, glad scherzo; 

Its strains showed his pure delight — 
A perfect harmony reigned there — 

Music, love, and a star-lit night. 



The campus was dark with shadows, 

The night was — a short while ago; — 
There stood 'neath a schoolgirl's window 

Six youths with their cigarettes aglow. 
They whispered with laugh and cajolery 

Before they began to sing; 
With tenors and basses so hearty 

They made the whole welkin ring. 

The serenade — was it Schubert's? — 

On that night but a short while ago, 
When no red rose fell from the window 

To the singers who stood below. 
Ah! no, 'twas no such sweet melody 

Broke the silence of night divine; 
They sang of a goat named Hiram 

That ate shirts from mother's clothes line 



The St. Mary's Muse. 189 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Basket Ball 
The Mu and Sigma teams had their second match game of the year 
on Saturday afternoon, March 16th. There was a large and sympa- 
thetic audience present, which followed the game with great interest 
and much cheering, but the game itself was far from a good one, as it 
was extremely rough. The fact that it was the first joint game played 
under the newly adopted "boys' rules" was probably the cause of this. 
The Sigma team was stronger and heavier than the Mu, but in spite of 
this the Mu was ahead at the end of the first inning. In the second 
inning, however, the Sigmas quickly recovered, and won the game by a 
score of 9-6. 

The line up was : 

Sigma. Mu. 

Olive Smith Center Georgie Puller 

Lois Pugh, Winifred Rogers Side Center. . . .Clara Ward, Gertrude Brigham 

Tallulah DeRosset Right Forward Jeannette Bruce 

Lucinda Martin Left Forward Elizabeth Walker 

Thomasine Edwards Right Guard Helen Hartridge 

Lucile Lebby Left Guard E. Maxwell 

An Afternoon Recital 
Thursday afternoon, March 21st, Miss Limey's pupils met in Miss 
Dowd's studio, where they all joined in a most delightful musical pro- 
gram. After the last number ice cream and cake were searved and the 
afternoon proved altogether most enjoyable. 

Mr. Lay's TalK 
Friday evening, March 22d, Mr. Lay made a talk in the school room 
on "Student Government." His remarks were based on the Sophomore 
English debate on that subject and were most entertaining. 

Easter Monday Egg Hunt 
On Easter Monday the Epsilon Alpha Pi Society entertained the 
whole school at an Easter egg hunt. The eggs were hidden in the grass 
in front of the main building, while little rabbits and chickens were 



190 The St. Mary's Muse. 



perched around in low branches of trees. The hunt did not begin until 
it was dusk, so it was all the more exciting to get them all found before 
it grew too dark. Every one went to work with a zest and heavy finds 
were made by some of the searchers, and all were very merry over it. 
After the eggs were all found (or at least all except a small number 
kindly left for the primary children to find next day) all went to the 
parlor, where dancing and lemonade brought to a close a delightful 
evening. 

The Music Festival 

About sixty girls made a part of the large number of people both from 
Raleigh and out-of-town, who attended the music festival in the Audi- 
torium April 10-11. There were three concerts, two evening ones and 
one in the afternoon, and all were enjoyed very much — particularly 
the afternoon concert. The Victor Herbert Orchestra was especially 
fine in the beautiful Dvorak symphony played in the afternoon. 

Sigma Lambda Dance 

The Sigma Lambda Society gave a delightful dance on April 13th, at 
which were present all of the E. A. P. Society, their own members, and 
the faculty. Some novel figures were danced, led by Caroline Jones, 
and the whole evening was very pleasant, not the smallest part of the 
pleasure being the delicious ice cream served. 

Miss Heyward's Picnic 

Miss Heyward's class, about twelve girls, who form the sub-prepara- 
tory department, spent Monday, the 13th of April, on a picnic which 
they all enjoyed greatly. They found Pullen Park, though not very far 
afield, a very agreeable and entertaining spot to spend the day. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



Mrs. H. H. McLendon, Lina Lockhart's sister, spent one day in 
Raleigh and Lina enjoyed being down town with her. 

Susie Mclver's sister and Miss Ellen Duval, an old St. Mary's girl, 
were most welcome at the School during the month. 



The St. Mary s Muse. 191 

Mrs. Albert Thomas (Emily Garrison, '07) and her little son, Henry, 
were guests of Miss Thomas for several days after Easter, and their visit 
was greatly enjoyed. 

Marion Haigh, of Fayetteville, was at St. Mary's for a few hours, on 
her way back from the Chapel Hill Easter dance. 

Virginia Divine, who was at St. Mary's last year, spent several days 
at the School during March as the guest of Emily Marriott. 

Fannie Cooper, Lois Pugh, Helen Hartridge, Martha and Helen 
Wright, and Ruth Rosser have all been fortunate enough to have had 
visits from their mothers recently. 

Miss Evelyn Weeks was here for a short time on Palm Sunday. 

Ellen Duval paid a short visit to St. Mary's on the 3d of April, taking 
dinner and spending the evening. 

Miss Mary Hancock, of Reidsville, was a guest of Miss Davis for 
several days in April. 

Mr. Hodgson is with us again, arriving just in time for Easter. 

Julia Bond, of Edenton, was the guest of the Edenton girls for Easter. 

Nell Lewis, '11, visited the School on the 5th, and was here for 
luncheon. 

Mrs. C. L. Pridgen (Ha Rountree, '10) with Dr. Pridgen, was at St. 
Mary's for all the Easter Day services. 

Miss Dowd went to Lincolnton April 13th to visit Miss Pixley, with 
Miss Schutt of the Winthrop College faculty (a former member of St. 
Mary's Music faculty) ; she was present as one of the judges of Miss 
Pixley's "certificate pupils." 

Miss Shull and Mr. Owen spent Monday at Warrenton, where Mr. 
Owen gave an organ recital for the benefit of the church there — Miss 
Shull assisted him. 

Mr. Lay's brother, Mr. Bierne Lay, and Mr. Ernest Howard, both 
masters at St. Paul's School, Concord, X. H., visited Mr. Lay during 
the latter part of April. 

The Commencement Marshals chosen by the Literary Societies are, on 
the part of the Sigma Lambda Society — Amy Winston, Chief, Jennie 
Woodruff, Susan Rawlings, and Beverly DuBose ; on the part of the 
Epsilon Aplha Pi Society — Mary Owen, Margaret Erwin, and Margaret 
Bottom. 



192 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Domestic Science Class spent the afternoon of April 1st visiting 
the dairy department of the A. & M. College. Through the courtesy of 
Mr. MclSTutt, the head of the department, the girls were able to see at 
work the various machines for testing and separating milk, and after- 
wards they went to the dairy barn and saw the fine stock, and the process 
of milking. It was a practical lesson which the girls enjoyed and appre- 
ciated very much. 



A Suggestion 

I would gently suggest to the wise ones 

A beautiful theme for debate, 
A matter at once to be settled — 

"Is it better to hurry or wait?" 

Of course to the wise guy observer 

There's nothing at all in this rhyme; 
He will say, with a look full of wisdom 

"Start in time, take your time, be on time!" 

But the common or garden variety 

Of man, if he would not be late 
And miss all the good things he's after, 

Must sure either hurry or wait. 

Chaw Sib. 

(The foregoing is one of our friend Mr. Hodgson's latest bits of philosophy.) 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year s ■ ■ ■ One Dollar. 

Single Copies s ■ • a ■ Fifteen Cents. 

■ — 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 

the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1911-1912. 

Patsey Harry Smith, Editor-in-Chief. 
Nellie Hendricks, Mary Hancock Owen, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart, Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Evelyn Cameron Maxwell, Susan Porter Rawlings. 

Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon, Business Manager. 
Caroline Clarke Jones, Asst. Business Manager. 

EDITORIAL 



"The year's at the spring 
And day's at the morn; 
Morning's at seven; 
The hillside's dew-pearled; 
The lark's on the wing; 
The snail's on the thorn: 
God's in His Heaven — 
All's right with the world." 

And so it is Easter, Easter morning at St. Mary's ! 

When the lately risen sun, streaming through the stainings of the 
windows has but partially wrought its colored patterns upon the floor, 
the doors of the chapel are flung wide and girls clad in purest white 
enter singing an Easter hymn. Thus the early morning service with 
its sweet solemnity is begun. 

Universally Easter is a time of rejoicing, its deepest significance 
being the birth of the hope of mankind — it is the time when all nature, 
with its myriad beauties and fresh wonders, is revivified. At St. 
Mary's it is a day never to be forgotten by those who in memory turn 
here with "Alma Mater" upon their lips. jSTo one can fully realize or 
understand the sheer joyousness of it, the triumphal gladness, unless 



194 The St. Mary's Muse. 



they too have been one of those to march into the chapel at the opening 
of the noonday service, singing: 

"'Welcome, happy morning!' age to age shall say; 
Hell today is vanquished, Heaven is won today. 
Lo! the dead is living, God for evermore! 
Him, their true Creator, all His works adore!" 

Lo, Lent with its solemn hymns and purple hangings is gone — the 
altar is adorned with Easter lilies, the perfume of flowers is every- 
where. Outside, the world is green, birds sing and organ and voices 
join together in the anthem — 

"He is risen! He is risen! 
Tell it out with joyful voice. 
He has burst His three days prison; 
Let the whole wide world rejoice." 



Loyalty 



What does loyalty really mean, in plain ordinary language and 
thought ? And what does loyalty to our Alma Mater mean to us ? Or 
what should it mean ? 

First, I think we should understand it. Understand what our Alma 
Mater tries to do for us and what it needs us to do for it. And we can 
do it easily if we only assume the proper attitude of mind. Then we 
ourselves will believe in St. Mary's, and of course if you believe in any- 
thing you are going to stand up for it. And by standing up for it I 
don't mean a blind and stubborn defense of everything and everybody 
existing up here as being perfect. That's absurd ! 

Sometimes we will have to acknowledge ourselves as being quite 
faulty, even if we are "St. Mary's girls," but then we can easily call to 
mind the nice things we do, or the bad things we don't do, when some 
dear gossipy old, or middle aged, soul, on the outside looks as if she 
could pick a flaw if she tried ! 

So much for our wordy battles with fault-finders; whether in town, 
out of town, or worst of all, on the grounds. 

Next, I think a very important element in loyalty is support — mental, 
moral, and physical S-u-p-p-o-r-t, with a capital S. All different kinds 



The St. Mary's Muse. 195 

or organizations, businesses, and amusements in School have got to be 
run. They aren't machines and they won't go alone. And if every one 
of us don't do our part in supporting them, we will simply get to be 
deadbeats, and the Literary Societies, athletics, dances, or what not will 
either fade into nothingness, or absorb the personality of a few. And 
that's where the kick comes in. 

We are content to merely drift, and yet if the other fellow doesn't row 
the boat to our satisfaction — what do we do ? Take the oars ? Do we ? 
Loyalty would do its share in the beginning and the boat would run 
smoothly — and so loyalty to Alma Mater would understand, believe, sup- 
port, and act. Mabgaeet Beoadeoot. 



The Seventy-first Commencement 



The Commencement of this year will mark a departure from the cus- 
tom of recent years in the shortening of the Commencement season. 
Heretofore the Commencement Exercises have begun with the Annual 
Sermon on Sunday morning and concluded with the Graduating and 
final exercises on Thursday morning of Commencement week. This 
year by bringing the several events closer together they will all be in- 
cluded in the time between Saturday evening and Tuesday morning. 

The program is this: 

Saturday, May 25th, 8:30 p.m. Annual Elocution Recital. 

Sunday, May 26th, 11:00 a.m. Annual Sermon. 

5:00 p.m. Alumnas Service. 

Monday, May 27th, 11:00 a.m. Class Day Exercises. 

4:00 p.m. Annual Alumnae Meeting. 

8:30 p.m. Annual Concert. 

9:30 p.m. Rector's Reception and Annual Art Exhibit. 

Tuesday, May 28th, 10:30 a.m. Graduating Exercises. 

Commencement Address. 

12:30 p.m. Final Exercises. 

The Annual Sermon will be preached by Rev. Eeese F. Alsop, D.D., 
Kector-emeritus of St. Ann's Church, Brooklyn, X. Y., and the Com- 
mencement Address will be delivered by Dean E. K. Graham, of the 
University of North Carolina. The Elocution Department Recital will 
be a rendition of "The Taming of the Shrew." 



196 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The graduating class numbers eight: Margaret Broadfoot, of Fay- 
etteville ; Frances Bottum, of Asheville ; Nellie Hendricks, of Marshall ; 
Elizabeth Hughes, of Raleigh; Lina Lockhart, of Wadesboro; Fannie 
McMullan, of Elizabeth City, and Anna Strong and Patsey Smith, of 
Raleigh. 



The Bishop's Visitation 



The annual visitation of Bishop Cheshire to the Chapel for Confirma- 
tion was made as usual on Palm Sunday, March 31st. 

At the eleven o'clock service the lessons were read by Bishop Hall, of 
Vermont, who is making a visit to Bishop Cheshire, at "Ravenscroft," 
and the Rector baptized Mary Tyson and Lois Pugh. 

At the five o'clock service Bishop Hall again assisted in the service, 
while Rev. M. A. Barber and Rev. J. H. Swann, of Christ Church, were 
also in the chancel when the Rector presented a class of eight to Bishop 
Cheshire for confirmation. 

Those confirmed were Katie Ferebee, Dorothy Hopkins, Margaret 
Jordan, Ellen Lay, Melba McCullers, Lois Pugh, Mary Tyson, and 
Bonner Williamson. 

During Holy Week the Communion was celebrated daily, except on 
Good Friday, at 6 :45 a. m., and the Rector spoke briefly at the daily 
evening services at 5 :30 on the events of the day in Holy Week. On 
Good Friday Bishop Cheshire preached at the morning service. 



Tljc Post-Easter Program 



Easter week was well filled with diversions from beginning to end, 
from the A. & M.-Wake Forest baseball game Monday afternoon and the 
Epsilon Alpha Pi Easter egg hunt and German Monday night to the 
Sigma Lambda dance Saturday night, the annual music festival being 
the feature of the week. 

The May Muse will take up the story of the St. Mary's happenings 
after Easter week, but it is of interest to look a little at some of the 
events that are before us in the very brief period before Commencement. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 197 



The Peace-St. Mary's Concerts 



The series of Peace-St. Mary's concerts will continue with the recital 
of Mr. Larue Boals, basso, given in the St. Mary's auditorium on Thurs- 
day, the 18th, and will conclude with a song recital by Mr. Randall 
Hargreaves, of ]STew York, on May 9th. These concerts always awaken 
much interest. 



The Certificate Recitals 



The Certificate Recitals, given on Monday evenings, will number four 
this season, beginning with that of Miss Sarah Baker Fenner, of 
Raleigh, in piano, on the 22d. 

They are as follows : 

April 22. Miss Sarah Baker Fenner, of Raleigh, in Piano. 

May 6. Miss Emilie Rose Knox, of Raleigh, in Violin. 

May 13. Miss Susan Porter Rawlings, of Wilson, in Organ. 

May 20. Miss Zona May Shull, of Montana, in Voice. 



Other Musical Events 



On Monday, April 29th, the chorus of sixty voices which Mr. Owen 
has been training through the year will give its recital, and on May 18th 
the St. Mary's orchestra will make its second appearance of the session 
in an orchestra concert. 



Dramatic Events 



Miss Davis has been devoting most of the energy of the Dramatic 
Club and Elocution Department this spring on the preparations for the 
giving of ''The Taming of the Shrew" at Commencemeent. The Chap- 
ter plays end with Lent, but the Freshmen will make their debut in 
dramatics on the 20th in "An Obstinate Family," and on Saturday, 
May 4th, comes the annual children's play, which will include the Rose 
Drill, Pandora's Box, and a scene from The Blue Bird. 



198 The St. Maky's Muse. 



On May 1st the Gymnasium Class, under the direction of Miss Davis, 
will give a May Pole Dance in the grove, followed by exercises in the 
gymnasium. 

Prof. Henderson's Lecture 

The lecture of Dr. Henderson, on April 27th, should be one of the 
great pleasures of the year. The News and Observer says on the subject, 
April 5th : 

Dr. Archibald Henderson, of the Chair of Mathematics at the University, has 
been invited to speak to the St. Mary's students, Saturday evening, April 27, on 
"Mark Twain," and he has accepted the invitation. 

The address will take place in the Auditorium of the college at 8 o'clock, and 
is for the public, which will find the study of Dr. Henderson one of the most 
interesting things produced upon this unique character in American letters. 
In the summer of 1907, Dr. Henderson and Mark Twain were on board the same 
ship going to England. They formed then a friendship that lasted the re- 
mainder of his short life, and Dr. Henderson, in addition to writing articles for 
the magazines, was the authorized biographer of Twain. A volume has re- 
cently issued from him and the literary critics pronounce it not only the best 
thing that Dr. Henderson has done, but among the best things yet written of 
Twain on this or the other side of the Atlantic. 

Dr. Henderson's lecture gives the public the story of Mark Twain from per- 
sonal contact. The North Carolina professor visited the great humorist and 
gathered material from him there. The subject is one of present interest and 
will be for a long time. Dr. Henderson speaks to an audience of college people 
and one by training in sympathy with him. 

He recently gave a lecture on Bernard Shaw, to whose fame on this side of 
the ocean he has added more than perhaps any other man. The lecture was 
heard at St. Mary's and was a magnificent presentation of the great dramatist's 
part in a great modern movement. Those who heard the University professor 
will be pleased greatly to have the opportunity of listening to him upon a theme 
of the nature that he has chosen. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN— CLIPPINGS 



O, wa'd some pow'r the giftie gie us, 
To see some folks before they see us, 
It wa'd from hands of torture free us, 

In this vale below. 
For we could to jungles hie us 
Where these bores might never spy us- 
Rather have the wild beasts nigh us 

Than some folks we know. 



The St. Mary s Muse. 199 

She measured out the butter with a very solemn air 
The milk and sugar also, and she took the greatest care 
To count the eggs correctly, and to add a little bit 
Of baking powder, which, you know, beginners oft omit; 
Then she stirred it all together 
And she baked it for an hour; 
But she never quite forgave herself 
For leaving out the flour. — Ex. 



Hoot and Toot Hottentot 
If a Hottentot taught a Hottentot tot 
To tot ere the tot could totter, 

Ought the Hottentot tot 

To be taught to say "aught" 
Or "naught," or what ought to be taught her? 

Or— 

If to hoot and to toot a Hottentot tot 

Be taught by a Hottentot footer, 
Should the footer get hot if the Hottentot tot 

Hoot and toot at the Hottentot footer? 



Giving Away the Secret of Success 
"What is the secret of success?" asked the Sphinx. 
"Push," said the Button. 
"Never be lead," said the Pencil. 
"Take pains," said the Window. 
"Always keep cool," said the Ice. 
"Be up-to-date," said the Calendar. 
"Never lose your head," said the Barrel. 
"Make light of everything," said the Fire. 
"Do a driving business," said the Hammer. 
"Aspire to greater things," said the Nutmeg. 
"Be sharp in all your dealings," said the Knife. 
"Find a good thing and stick to it," said the Glue. 
"Do the work you are suited for," said the Chimney. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnse Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

("Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - < Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 

President ... - Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

Secretary ... - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 
Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

Field Secretary - Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem. 



EDITORIAL 



Let us not forget the Alunmse Day meetings on May 12th or 13th. 



The interest manifested by the replies to recent letters sent to mem- 
bers of the Alumnse inviting subscriptions to the Muse is very gratify- 
ing. It is hoped to get some Alumnse news taken from these letters into 
the next Muse. 



A more than usual interest attaches to some of the Alumnse wed- 
dings chronicled in this number of the Muse. The Muse extends 
congratulations. 



Alumoae Deaths 

Evelyn Bird Simpson, at her home in Raleigh on April 

Mrs. Grange Ashe (Cad Clopton Hervey), at her home in Raleigh 
on April 10th. 



The St. Marts Muse. 201 



Alumnae Weddings 



Lewis-Sharp 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles Topping Windley 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Lottie Hays Sharp 

to 

Mr. Kemp Plummer Lewis 

on the evening of Tuesday the sixteenth of April 

at nine o'clock 

Saint James' Church 

Belhaven, North Carolina 



Sutton Venable 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Preston Venable 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Cantey McDowell 

to 

Mr. Louis Valvelle Sutton 

on the evening of Tuesday, the thirtieth of April 

nineteen hundred and twelve 

at eight o'clock 

Chapel of the Cross 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



Viewers -Lumsden 

On April 3d, at noon, at her mother's home on Hillsboro street, the marriage 
of Miss Mattie Lumsden, daughter of Mrs. C. P. Lumsden, to Rev. Thurman G. 
Vickers, of Burgaw, was solemnized. 



Butler-Sherman 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Darden 

announce the marriage of their daughter 

Belle Darden Sherman 

to 

Mr. Lucius Nelson Butler 

on Saturday, the thirtieth of March 

one thousand nine hundred and twelve 

Pasadena, California 

Enclosed cards read : 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucius Nelson Butler 

will be at home after May first 

Sunderland, Massachusetts 



READ !— M ARK, I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 

Dry Goods of all kinds, Tailored Costumes, 
all kinds of Fancy Goods 



FAYETTEVII/LE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Too Bad 

There was a young lady of Crewe 
Who wanted to make the two-two; 

Said the porter, "Don't hurry, 

Or flurry, or scurry, 
It's a minute or two to two-two." 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 

WWSwSP %• V W 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES 5® SLIPPERS 



"It's worth the difference' 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROY ALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS. 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 


127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh. X. C. 


Insurance Against Loss by Fire 

Beat Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 


The Mechanics Savings Bank 


COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINX 4 CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

BALEIGH, tt. C. 


THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 
CA>~DT — CHINA — TOTS 

PICTURES STATIONERY 



"Nick" says the stars are fireflies, lost 

As far, far up they flew; 
"Pug" calls them little silvery nails 

To hold the floor of blue; 
"Nell" calls them gimlet holes in heaven 

To let the glory through. 



NORFOLK 

OYSTE RS 

DAILY 

Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St . Both Phones 356 

HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH. N. C. 

ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 

Good Thixgs Always at 

BRETSCH'a BAKERY 



J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH. X. C. 

CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 
For Toilet Reo.uisites and Cold Drinks 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fi-i 5L:-es 



Advertisements. 



WHY IS 

Brantley's Fountain 

The Most Popular? 

ASK THE GIRLS 

POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 
105 Fayetteville St. 

CARVER'S STABLES 

HARNESS AND SADDLE HORSES 
Phone 229 117 E. Davie St. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 



G. H. DORTCH, 

Secretary. 



R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. G. 



A funny old lady named Borgia, 

Had a parrot whose nerve would have floored yer. 

Her mistress would whack her 

And say, "Have a cracker," 
And that bird would say, "Fire, nut, or Georgia?" 



I. ROSENTHAL 
SCO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 




Advertisements. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 
MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 

OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital 8100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



C. E. HARTGE 



Architect 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 

C 1 7 A 

Both Phones :< 2 ofi 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 

ICE 

CREAM 

Phone 123 Cor. Salisbury & Hargett Sts. 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all makes repaired 



'I want to be an angel." That 
We heard a fat man say. 

'I'm growing weary of this fat, 
I would not live all weigh." 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. PULLEN 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent Interest paid on deposits. 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


THE HOTEL RALEIGH 

INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 


ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson 

PRESIDENT 



F. H. Briggs 

CASHIER 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round steps bank" since 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 

Jolly &• Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 
Garments at our store because we sell better goods 
for less money The Fashion 203-205 Fayetteville St. 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FATETTEVILLE ST. 




THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY-GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

222 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 



When the donkey saw the zebra, 

He began to switch his tail; 
'Well, I never!" was his comment, 
"Here's a mule that's been in jail. 



WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 

Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C- 

Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 

Dr. M. C. HORTON 

DENTIST 

GREEN & WATSON Art Store 
11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
217H Fayetteville Street Phone 953-R 

N. H. MOORE 
Repairer of Fine Shoes E. Hargett Street 

BRIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

DR. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 

DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON, DENTIST 

116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 



DARNELL & THOMAS 



MUSIC HOUSE 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

CARDWELL'S 
ALL KINDS OF CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Rosea, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. O Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new Jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



Apr. 13, Saturday. 

Apr. 18, Thursday. 

Apr. 20, Saturday. 

Apr. 22, Monday. 



St. Mary's Calendar, 1912. 

April. 
Sigma Lambda Dance. 

Peace-St. Mary's Concert. Mr. Larue Boals, Basso. 
Freshman Play. "An Obstinate Family." 
Certificate Recital. Miss Sarah Fenner, Piano. 



Apr. 27, Saturday. Lecture. Prof. Archibald Henderson on "Mark Twain." 

Apr. 29, Monday. Chorus Concert. 
Apr. 30, Tuesday. Inter-society Debate. 

May. 

May 1, Wednesday. May Day Exercises. 

May 4, Saturday. Children's Play. 

May 6, Monday. Certificate Recital. Miss Emilie Rose Knox, Violin. 

May 9, Thursday. Peace-St. Mary's Concert. Mr. Randall Hargreaves, Baritone. 

May 11, Saturday. Freshman Reception to Seniors. 

May 12, Sunday. Alumnae Day. 70th Anniversary of the Opening of St. Mary's. 

May 13, Monday. Raleigh Alumna? Luncheon at St. Mary's. 1:30. 

Certificate Recital. Miss Susan Rawlings, Organ. 
May 16, Thursday. Ascension Day. Holy Day. 
May 18, Saturday. Orchestra Concert. 

May 20, Monday. Certificate Recital. Miss Zona Shull, Voice. 
May 25-28. Commencement Season. 



THE DEMOCRAT 

TENNESSEE'S GREATEST NEWSPAPER 

Accurate Market Reports All the World's Happenings 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

6 



Location Central for the Carolina*. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School, 

RALEIGH, N. C 

(for girls and young women) 



'Otti ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1911. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1912. 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ ®- THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these ( %- THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: j ^ TEE ART SCE QQ Lm 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

In 1911-12 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



fEfje 



frt. jfflarp'* jWuge 



iBap, 1912 



ftaletgi), &. C. 



"The St. Mary's Muse. 

PRE-COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 
Vol. XVI. May, 1912. No. 9 

Commencement Program, 1912 

Saturday, May 25, 8:15 p.m., Annual Elocution Recital in the Auditorium. 

"The Taming of the Shrew." 

Sunday, May 26, 11:00 a.m., Commencement Sermon in the Chapel by Rev. 

Reece F. Alsop, D.D , of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

5:00 p.m., Alumnae Service in the Chapel. 

Monday, May 27, 11:00 a.m., Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

3:00 p.m., Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the 

Studio. 
4:30 p.m., Annual Alumna? Meeting in the Art Studio. 
8:30 p.m., Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 
9:30 p.m., Rector's Reception in the School Parlor. 

Tuesday, May 28, 11:00 a.m., Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. 

Annual Address by Dean Edward K. Graham, of 
the University of North Carolina. 

Closing Exercises in the Chapel. 



Commencement Sketch 



Margaret Strange Broadfoot. 



"Do help me get ready ! I've had such a time ! And I simply can't 
be late today." A few moments later two girls slip quietly into their 
accustomed places, and watch the others come in from all directions, 
to the eleven o'clock assembly. Every one is dressed in white, from 
the teacher at the desk, who taps the bell for formation, to the smallest 
Primary pupil, and each one has a general air of being-and-looking- 
my-best for a state occasion. 



204 The St. Mary's Muse. 



That it is quite "an occasion" everything goes to prove. Excitement 
and suppressed emotion charge the very atmosphere ; visitors, more 
numerous than usual, walk around the grove, now marked with sum- 
mer's own fingerprints, or stop to watch the long line of girls who, in 
purest white, glimmer in the May sunlight, file two by two toward the 
Auditorium and through the side door. More people are seen coming 
up the walk from down town: mothers, sisters, and all the truest St. 
Mary adherents — they gather for the approaching exercises. Upon 
the stage inside the auditorium are seated familiar friends : the Bishops, 
Trustees, the Rector, and the Seniors of 1912. A pause, after the 
noise and bustle of seating the audience has subsided, and the exer- 
cises begin. Of course these exercises are just like those of any other 
school in form, but somehow they give you a tightening in the throat 
and a thankful feeling that you don't have to say anything just then 
but can pinch the person next to you and study the toes of your shoes 
quite carefully. 

Once more the girls are forming; this time with the Seniors who, 
with arms burdened with flowers, are led by the Chief Marshal at the ] 
head of a long line of girls, Faculty, ministers and Bishops. On they 
march toward the Chapel, and as they near it a silence rests softly over | 
all, while the line divides, and led by the clergy all enter the Chapel 
singing : 

Jerusalem, high tower, thy glorious walls, 
Would God, I were in thee. 

Desire of thee my longing heart enthralls, 
Desire at home to he. 

"Wide from the world out-leaping 
O'er hill and vale and plain, 

My soul's strong wing is sweeping, 
Thy portals to attain. 

This ecstatically joyous hymn is a most fitting one for it both glad- 
dens the hearts of those who hear it and at the same time suggests a 
sadness and regret, especially to those who are newly made alumnae 
in 1912. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 205 



Clement hjall— Long Ago 



Rebecca Devereux Kyle. 



Reader, although the name, Clement Hall, sounds as if it was the 
JIall of Fame — some far-famed museum — or a library of wonderful, 
old books, it is in reality the dining hall of St. Mary's School — a place 
of refreshment, an oasis in the midst of a desert of studies. What 
blithe sounds are heard there three times a day; what chattering, what 
clinking of knives and forks, and, mingled with it all, is the appetizing 
odor of roast beef, of codfish, or of hash ! 

Into the midst of practice, that bane of a schoolgirl's existence, there 
breaks the sound of the bell. Now this is not an ordinary tinkling 
bell but a tolling bell. The sound of its toll is welcome at noon, for 
then it has a pleasant, inviting toll ; but at seven o'clock in the morn 
of a dull, leaden, winter day it has the sound of a tolling iron bell — 
a funeral bell — a dirge. 

Soon after the sound of the bell has died away the girls come troop- 
ing to Clement Hall, some in rags, some in tags, and some just button- 
ing up the back of a refractory dress as they run, for Mr. L., the head 
master, inflicts a severe punishment upon any damsel who is so negli- 
gent as to arrive after the grace has been said. Then there is a gen- 
eral scraping of chairs, and every one is seated. Now if it is Sunday, 
or a Feast day, or a Saint's day (all of which festivals are religiously 
observed at St. Mary's) there will be a variation of the accustomed 
diet, probably just some slight detail, but enough to cause joy, delight, 
and anticipation to be written on the face of each one. 

Now the meal is finished, and each table is excused by the lady in 
charge and groups of happy, noisy, carefree girls pass out. Probably 
they go to Chapel or else there is a general rush for mail, and Clement 
Hall is left in silence and to the mercy of the servant girls, who pre- 
pare for another meal. 

Alas ! the vision passes from my mind and I am no longer a care- 
free girl, but a silver-haired old lady of threescore years and ten. How 
things have changed since then ! That old bell that I used to love so 



20.6; The St. Mary's Muse. 



well is gone and in its place modern electric bells reign supreme. Ah 
me ! "The old order changeth yielding place to new," yet St. Mary's 
School will always be one of the dearest spots in my memory. 

The visions of the past 

Sustain the heart in feeling; 
Life as she is — our changeful life, 

With friends and kindred dealing. 



A Dissertation Upon Mayonnaise 



Susan Porter Rawlings. 



History gives as the birthplace of Mayonnaise, Bayonne, and sug- 
gests that the name should be Bayonnaise on this account. The art 
of making it was discovered in this wise : Charles IX, Elizabeth of 
Spain, Alva, and Catherine de Medici were holding an interview at 
Bayonne, and incidentally were planning the massacre of St. Bartholo- 
mew. After the interview a great feast was made, and the best chefs of 
France were engaged in preparing the most attractive and costly dishes 
to soothe the palates and satisfy the "inner man" of the assembly. One 
day while this preparation was in progress the yolk of an egg was acci- 
dentally dropped in a bowl with a mixture of salt, pepper, oil, and 
lemon, and a simple, idle serving maid, with a fork in her hand, stirred 
it. She. was only amusing herself, and so when she licked her finger 
and tasted the smooth, oily substance and found it good for food, she 
did nothing less than give a shriek of delight.. The seneschal and 
masters of the meats and drinks, and the lesser servants, all cried out 
in dismay, and well-nigh hurled the offender from the kitchen. But 
my story is growing too long. I will only say that in self-defense the 
inmates of the royal kitchen tasted the obnoxious mixture and found 
it so pleasing that they served it to the King and Queen; and from 
that time men, women, and children have feasted on and enjoyed the 
misty clouds of this foamy stuff. 

The mayonnaise must be in a stiff, jelly-like mass, highly seasoned 
and dashed with tabasco sauce, and then I defy one to produce a flavor 



The St. Mary's Muse. 207 

surpassable, which in its cooling fragrance may well be called a bless- 
ing of the palate. Notice it while it is making ! how the delicate color- 
ing and creamy softness brings a moistening to the mouth ; and notice 
how it lies, as in a bed, in a glittering cut glass bowl. Is it possible 
that one could put to any better or more beautiful use the simple in- 
gredients of this time-honored dish ? In such a death of self-sacrifice 
any egg or any oil would be happy to die, and lie entombed forever. 
Mayonnaise ! what a place you fill in the world ; you grace the tables 
of kings, you grace banquets, and you grace the most brilliant func- 
tions ; you fill all enviable places, and the world will ever sing your 
praises. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Susan Porter Rawlings, Editor. 

Freshman Play 

On April 20th the Freshman class gave a very amusing little farce 
called "The Obstinate Family." It was well acted and staged, and is 
especially notable as being the first play ever given at St. Mary's by the 
Freshmen as a class. 

The cast is given below: 

Program 

Mr. Harwood, Harford's father-in-law Mary Bryan Griswold 

Mrs. Harwood, Harford's mother-in-law Kate Leak 

Henry Harford Mary Franklin Graves 

Jessie Harford, his wife Irwin Magee 

James, the butler Margaret Botttjm 

Lucy, the maid Julia Rowe 

Scene: A room in the Harfords' villa at Richmond. 



Mr. Larue Boals, Basso 



The third concert of the Peace-St. Mary's series was held Thursday, 
April 18, in the auditorium, and was a song recital by Mr. Larue Boals, 



208 The St. Mary's Muse. 



basso. Mr. Boals has a rich, musical voice of much power and he gave 
great pleasure to a large audience. 
The program was as follows : 

1. Vittoria, Vittoria Carissimi 

Hear Me, Ye Winds and Waves Handel 

Honor and Arms Handel 

2. Mother o' Mine Tours 

O Love and Joy Chadwick 

The Northern Days Chadwick 

Gray Days Johnson 

King Charles White 

3. I Attempt from Love's Sickness Pur cell 

Once I Loved a Maiden Pair Parker 

The Complacent Lover Parker 

Uncle Rome Homer 

Banjo Song Homer 

4. Der Wanderer Schubert 

Who is Sylvia? Schubert 

Songs My Mother Taught Me Dvorak 

The Two Grenadiers Schumann 

Me. R. Blinn Owen at Piano. 



Piano Recital 



The first certificate recital of the year was given April 22d by Sarah 
Baker Fenner, a pupil of Miss Scheper. The News and Observer of 
the next day said: 

The piano recital by Miss Sarah Fenner last evening in St. Mary's Auditorium 
reflected credit upon the young pianist and upon her teacher, Miss Scheper. 

The program was a varied and well chosen one, making considerable demand 
upon the player. Miss Fenner's playing is characterized by easy, fluent tech- 
nique and musical tone. The Beethoven Sonata was well given and the Raff 
"Rigaudon" was an excellent piece of work. Miss Fenner's delicacy of touch 
and taste in interpretation were perhaps best shown in the Heller "Caprice" 
and in the Schumann "Papillons." 

Miss Fenner was ably assisted by Miss Emilie Rose Knox, who delighted the 
audience with two violin numbers, "Le Cygne" of Saint-Saens and "Hungarian 
Dance" of Haesche. 

1. Prseludium and Toccata, Op. 57 Lachner 

2. Sonata, Op. 10, No. 2 Beethoven 

Allegro 

Allegretto 

Presto 



The St. Mary's Muse. 209 

3. (a) Le Cygne Saint-Saens 

(b) Hungarian Dance Haesche 

Miss Emilie Rose Kxox. 

4. Impromptu, Op. 142, No. 3 Schubert 

5. Caprice iiber Mendelssohn's Elfin Dance, Op. 144, No. 2 Heller 

6. La Fileuse, Op. 157, No. 2 Raff 

7. Rigaudon, Op. 204, No. 3 Raff 

8. Papillons, Op. 2 Schumann 



Chorus Concert 



The yearly concert of the Chorus Class and Voice Department, post- 
poned from the 29th to the 30th of April, was very successful. The 
account given by the News and Observer and the program are given 
below : 

The excellent training of the voice department of St. Mary's School was in 
evidence last evening throughout the concert which delighted the audience. 

The three-part chorus of seventy-five voices was well balanced and well 
trained. The attacks were exact, the phrasing and shading good, and the vol- 
ume satisfactory without any straining or forcing the voices. The chorus 
"Trust in the Lord," Handel's "Largo," with Miss Mann at the piano, Miss Luney 
at the organ, and violin obligato by Miss Emilie Rose Knox, was one of the most 
ambitious numbers on the program. It was well rendered. The Nevin "Trio," 
sung by Misses Elizabeth Tarry, Amy Winston, and Fredrika Gilbert, violin 
obligato by Miss Margaret Erwin and 'cello by Miss Luney, was very melodious 
and effective. 

The soloists of the evening were Miss Esther Baker, whose light, clear soprano 
was heard to advantage in "A Eridge of Stars," by Hadley; Miss Lucy Dortch, 
who sang "Nymphs and Fauns," by Bemberg, with brilliancy and dramatic effect, 
responding to the applause with a charming encore, and Miss Kate Smith, who 
sang "My Life and Thine," by Allitsen (violin obligato by Miss Margaret Erwin). 
Miss Smith has a beautiful mezzo-soprano, rich and smooth, and her enunciation 
is particularly good. An artistic number was the Flower Duet from "Madame 
Butterfly," beautifully sung by Miss Zona Shull and Miss Marguerite Blakely. 
Miss Eleanor Vass Mann did steady, good work as chorus accompanist. 

The work of the semi-chorus was doubly interesting, because of the attractive 
numbers and because of the good voices revealed. The members of the semi- 
chorus were: First sopranos — Misses Kate Smith, Marguerite Blakely, Frances 
Lilly, Penelope Gallup, and Carrie Cleaton; second sopranos — Misses Amy Wins- 
ton, Gertrude Brigham, Elizabeth Tarry, Zona Shull, and Susanne Busbee; 
altos — Misses Kate Leak, Margaret Erwin, and Fredrika Gilbert. 

The last number on the program was a popular number greatly enjoyed by 



210 The St. Mary's Muse. 



the audience, "O Lovely Night," from Contes d'Hoffman (violin obligato by 
Miss E. R. Knox), and "La Paloma," by Yradier. 

PART I. 

Largo Handel 

Chorus. 

Violin Obligato, Miss Emilie Rose Knox. 
Miss Luney at the Organ. 

"Doris," Trio Nevin 

Misses Elizabeth Tarry, Amy Winston, and Fredrika Gilbert. 
Violin, Miss Margaret Erwin. 
'Cello, Miss Bertha Luney. 

Habanera, from "Carmen" Bizet 

Miss Kate Smith and Semi-Chorus. 

(a) "A Bridge of Stars" de Koven 

(b) "A Doll's Wooing" Hadley 

Miss Esther Baker. 

Masetta's Waltz Song, from "La Boheme" Puccini 

Semi-Chorus. 

PART II. 

Nymphs and Fauns Bemberg 

Miss Lucy Dortch. 
String Quartette. 

(a) Romance Hellensbergh 

(b) "Annie Laurie" (Arranged for violins by Miss Grafts) 

Misses Blanche L. Crafts, Fannie Hines Johnson, 
Emilie Rose Knox, and Margaret Erwin. 

"My Life and Thine" Allitsen 

Miss Kate Smith. 
Violin Obligato, Miss Margaret Erwin. 

Flower Duette, from "Madam Butterfly" Puccini 

Misses Zona Shull and Marguerite Blakely. 

(a) "0 Lovely Night," from "Contes d'Hoffmann" Offenbach 

Violin Obligato, Miss E. R. Knox. 

(b) "La Paloma" Yradier 

Chorus. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 211 



May Day 



On the afternoon of May first the gymnasium classes, directed by 
Miss Davis, gave a unique and interesting entertainment in the gym- 
nasium. The classes were divided into four "squads," and after a few 
preliminary marches and exercises all together, these squads drilled as 
rivals, each of the four being put through their paces in turn. After 
this was over and the winning squad was announced, the little children 
danced three charming folk dances followed by a solo dance by Sallie 
Cameron. Next was an exciting foot race, won by Lois Pugh, then a 
potato race, and last of all a jumping contest, in which the contestants 
soon dwindled down to two, Lois Pugh and Elise Stiles, and was finally 
won by Lois Pugh. 

At seven o'clock the May Day festivities were closed by the crowning 
of the May Queen, Amy Winston. The Queen arrived in a cart drawn 
by a procession of girls, with another band of singing girls as attend- 
ants, and in her honor there was an old English folk dance, a dance 
about the May pole, and more singing. The effect was very charming, 
and was the first May Day celebration that has been seen at St. Mary's 
in many years. 

Recital 



On Thursday afternoon, May 2d, Miss DeRosset's pupils gave a 
piano recital in the auditorium. The girls showed much ability and 
promise and the recital was greatly enjoyed. 



The Annual Debate 



The Annual Inter-Society Debate was held on May 3d, the subject 
being "Resolved, that the reading of Realistic Fiction is more bene- 
ficial to young people than the reading of Romantic Fiction." The af- 
firmative was upheld by Lina Lockhart and Mary Butler, and the nega- 
tive by Patsey Smith and Mary Owen. As usual the occasion was 



212 The St. Maky's Muse. 



very exciting and the supporters of the two sides were intensely en- 
thusiastic for their speakers. The stage was liberally decorated with 
society banners and colors, and the members of E. A. P. Society were 
all seated together on one side of the Auditorium and the Sigma Lamb- 
das on the other, so that the applause and support could be more solid 
and inspiring. The subject of the debate was a difficult one, but all 
four debaters handled the subject well and seemed to bring out all 
points possible for their respective sides. As a result a decision seemed 
a very difficult matter, and the announcement of the judges' decision 
was awaited in wild excitement and breathless conjecture. The judges, 
Dr. A. B. Hunter, of St. Augustine ; Dr. Harrison and Mr. Peckham, 
of the A. and M. English Department, finally announced the verdict, 
which was two to one in favor of the affirmative, and the Sigma Lambdas 
added another victory to their growing list. 



Children's Entertainment 



The children in the Preparatory and Primary departments, trained 
and directed by Miss Davis, gave a charming entertainment in the 
auditorium on May 4th. 

The program and the account by the News and Observer are given: 

A large and appreciative audience gathered to enjoy the Children's Enter- 
tainment given by the Primary Department in the Auditorium of St. Mary's 
School last Saturday evening, May 4th. 

The children showed careful training and much intelligence in carrying out 
the instruction given them by Miss Florence C. Davis, instructor in elocution 
and physical culture at St. Mary's, under whose direction the very charming 
program was given, and to whose skill and energy the audience was indebted 
for a most delightful evening. 

It was very difficult to say which part of the program was the best; whether 
the Rose Drill, with twelve little rose colored children, all frills, ruffles, roses, 
and rose entwined hoops; or Pandora's Box, liberating bad and sorrowful charac- 
ters, but with palliating hope at the end; or the scene from the Blue Bird, the 
last admitting of more acting on the part of the impersonators, all of whom did 
very well and carried out the little play with spirit and imagination. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



213 



A well rendered interlude of two piano selections by Miss Isabelle Bowen 
came before the Blue Bird. 

Program 

ROSE DRILL. 

Randolph Hill 
Elizabeth Baker 
Katherine Baker 
Roe Ella Robbins 



Sallie Cameron 
Adelaide Boylston 
Lucy Lay 
Virginia Royster 



Mary Hoke 
Susie Linehan 
Mary Strange Morgan 
Mildred Wllliford 



PANDORA'S BOX (A FAIRY PLAY). 

CHARACTERS. 

Epimetbeus Elizabeth Woollcott 

Quicksilver Lillias Shepherd 

Pain Florence Harrison 

Pandora Nancy Lay 

Hope Katherine Hughes 

Sorrow Windham Ashe 

Naughtiness Elizabeth Cross 

Evil Passions Elizabeth Folk 

Piano — (a) Alice Chasing the White Rabbit Lynes 

(b) Grand Procession Lynes 

Isabelle Bowen. 



"THE BLUE BIRD." 



BY MAURICE MAETERLINCK. 



Once upon a time a woodcutter and his wife had two little children, Tyltyl 
and Mytyl. They are commanded by a fairy to fare forth in search of the Blue 
Bird, which is the European symbol for happiness. Among the places they visit 
is the Land of Memory, where they meet their grandfather and grandmother, 
long since dead. For, you see, all those whom we believe dead are not really. 
All that is required is a thought to bring them back to life. While in the Land 
of Memory they find what they think is the Blue Bird, but after they depart 
they find the bird is not blue but gray, so on they journey ever searching for the 
Blue Bird and finally reach their home cottage again only to discover that the 
turtle dove that hangs above the window is really the Blue Bird they have been 
so long in seeking. The Blue Bird itself represents that great unattainable for 
which man seeks because he is man, which he has sought since the beginning of 
the world. Our happiness, M. Maeterlinck has said, depends upon our concep- 



214: The St. Mary's Muse. 



tion of this great Unknown, and so, as a convenient catch phrase, we may call 
the Blue Bird the Secret of Happiness. 
Scene: The Land of Memory. 

CHARACTEKS. 

Tyltyl Elizabeth Telfair 

Mytyl Josephine Williford 

Graff er Tyl Isabella Cameron 

Granny Tyl Marie Linehan 

Elizabeth Hughes 

Alice Giersch 
Tyltyl's dead sisters and brother. . ( a ^ es Timbeelake 



Cicely Brown 



Violin Recital 



The second of the certificate recitals was given on May 6th by Emilie 
Rose Knox, violinist, assisted by Marguerite Blakely and Zona Slrall. 
According to the News and Ohserver, 

The recital given last evening by Miss Emilie Rose Knox proved beyond ques- 
tion her right to be considered a gifted violinist. The program was varied and 
interesting and provided opportunity for the display of the young artist's in- 
terpretative and technical powers. The De Beriot Concerto, No. 6, was probably 
the most difficult number on the program, and well did she meet its demands 
upon her technique with excellent double stopping, delightful staccato passages, 
with scales, arpeggios and trills, every note clear cut and perfect. 

The (a) and (b) number, "Romance," by Heitsch, and "Rezeda," by Priml, 
were given with a satisfying breadth of tone and sympathetic interpretation, 
while the Wieniawski Legende was one of Miss Knox's best examples of artistic 
treatment. The purity of the intonation and delicacy of treatment were a 
delight to the hearer and made this one of the most enjoyable numbers on the 
program. The last number, a Wieniawski "Mazurka," was given with good 
bowing, excellent rhythm, and brilliancy. 

Miss Knox, who is a certificate pupil of Miss Blanche L. Crafts, was ably 
assisted by Miss Marguerite Blakely and Miss Zona Shull, sopranos, who sang 
a Puccini duet charmingly. Miss Shull also gave two Chaminade selections 
with great beauty of voice and style. 

The program was as follows : 

I. Concerto, No. 6 De Beriot 

Allegro moderato 
Andante 
Allegretto 
Allegro vivace 






The St. Mary's Muse. 215 

II. Flower Duette, from "Madam Butterfly" Puccini 

Misses Shull and Blakely. 

III. (a) Romance, Op. 4 Heitsch 

(b) Rezeda, No. 2, Op. 59 Friml 

IV. Legende, Op. 17 Wieniawski 

V. Chanson Provencale Dell' Acqua 

(b) Berceuse Chaminade 

Miss Shull. 

VI. Mazurka, No. 1, Op. 19 Wieniaicski 

Obertass. 



Mr. Hargreaves' Recital 



Mr. Hargreaves' recital, given on May 9th, closed the Peace-St. 
Mary's concert series and was an artistic success in every way and a 
great treat to music lovers. 

The account given by the Neivs and Observer is quoted, and the pro- 
gram follows it : 

The song recital by Mr. Randall Hargreaves in St. Mary's Auditorium was the 
last of the Peace-St. Mary's concert series, and was greatly enjoyed by a large 
audience. The first part of the program was an informal illustrated talk on 
"Folk Songs of the British Isles," which was made peculiarly interesting by 
Mr. Hargreaves' beauty of diction, by thorough appreciation of the Anglo-Saxon 
and the Celtic temperament, and by an unusually valuable collection of the 
Folk Songs of his country. 

The second part of the program illustrated the modern school of song, with 
selections from Brahms, Strauss, Debussy, and others. Mr. Hargreaves gave 
this most artistic treatment, showing himself as much "to the manner born" in 
his use of the German and French, as of the English, Scotch, Welsh, and Irish 
text. Mr. Hargreaves uses his beautiful baritone voice with an ease which tells 
of training and culture. 

r> fl h PART I. 

Reflections — 

Illustrated by selections from 

Songs of the British Isles, Examples of German and French Songs, etc., 
at random. 

PART II. 

Mr. R. Blinn Owen, Accompanist. 

1. Sonntag Brahms 

2. Ich trage meine Minne Strauss 

3. Les Cloches Debussy 

4. Le Cor Flegier 

5. The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomon' Old Scottish Folk Song 

6. False Phyllis Old English Melody 



216 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Freshman Party 



One of the great events of the school year in its novelty, charm, and 
gaiety was the party given by the Freshman class on the evening of 
May 11th, complimentary to the Senior class, but at which the whole 
school, both students and faculty, were also guests. 

The party was planned to be given on the lawn, but on account of 
rain was given in the parlor instead. The decorations there showed 
the Senior colors, green and white, and the gray and red of the Fresh- 
men, besides plenty of lovely roses. The class all wore white, with 
red poppies, the class flower, in their hair, and rosettes and streamers 
of the class colors. At eight o'clock the doors were thrown open, and 
the Seniors, each attended by two Freshmen, were led to the place of 
honor. The other guests were ushered in, and a very original program 
was opened with a song of welcome, sung by Kate Smith, and followed 
by Margaret Bottum, the class president, who, in the name of the class, 
welcomed all the school. A jolly little Freshman song was then sung 
by all the class, followed by a recitation by Frances Walker, the last 
line of each stanza being repeated by the class in unison. The words 
of this recitation were largely written by Grace Crews. Another 
catchy little song was sung by Kate Smith, with a refrain sung by all, 
giving advice to the Preps, and asking mercy from the Faculty. The 
Freshmen then sang their own praises in a humorous little song which 
they called "Freshman Conceit," following which came toasts, one to 
the Seniors, Kate Leak ; to the Faculty, Julia Howe, and to the School, 
Mary Franklyn Graves. Then came the "Class recital" and the song 
to the Seniors. We can say for the program as a whole that it was 
splendidly carried out besides being unique in every way. The "Class 
Secret" was a complete secret until it was revealed at the end. It was 
a fine picture of General Lee, appropriately framed and bearing the 
plate with the inscription: "Presented to St. Mary's School by the 
Freshman class, May 11, 1912." The songs, toasts, and recitations 
were largely the work of the class, who with Elizabeth Tarry's able 
help gave them with vigor and spirit. After the program was com- 
plete Patsey Smith, for the Seniors, Mary Owen, for the Juniors, and 



The St. Maky's Muse. 217 

Jeanette Bruce, for the "Preps," made delightful little impromptu 
speeches to express their appreciation of the Freshmen's hospitality. 
Miss Katie also gave an impromptu toast to the Freshmen — earlier 
in the evening she had acknowledged their thought of her in the selec- 
tion of the picture. 

Refreshments were served at the close of the musical program, and 
besides being delicious were lovely to look at, as the ice cream, cake, 
and candies all were in the dainty green and white of the Senior class. 

At nine o'clock guests and hostesses joined in singing Alma Mater, 
and the guests withdrew, hearty in their praise of the famous Fresh- 
man class of 1912. 



Organ Recital 

Susan Rawlings' recital, given in the Chapel on May 13th, was the 
third of the certificate recitals of the year, and was very successful ; 
quoting the News and Observer: 

The organ recital by Miss Susan Rawlings, given in St. Mary's Chapel last 
evening was greatly enjoyed by an appreciative audience. 

From the brilliant opening number, a Toccata and Fugue by Bach, to the close 
the program was well rendered, with excellent technique and interpretative 
ability. 

The Rogers Sonata was splendidly done. This was the most difficult number 
on the program and made considerable demand upon the young player's powers, 
which demand was met with ease and confidence. 

Miss Rawlings is a certificate pupil of Miss Bertha M. Luney, organist of St. 
Mary's Chapel. The program of the recital is given below: 

1. Toccata and Fugue in D Bach 

2. Adagietto Bizet 

3. Andantino Lemare 

4. Cloches du Soir Goss-Custard 

5. Sonata in E minor Rogers 



Domestic Science Luncheons 



Miss Lane is having the Domestic Science class give a series of lun- 
cheons, one each Monday, which are proving very successful, both as 
to the training the girls get and the pleasure they give the guests. The 



218 The St. Mary's Muse. 



luncheons are prepared by some of the members of the class, while 
others serve as waitresses, host and hostess, and several members of the 
Faculty are present each time as guests. The plan gives the pupils 
very valuable lessons in practical housekeeping, and their response 
reflects much credit on Miss Lane. 



Dr. Archibald Henderson at St. Mary's 



Dr. Archibald Henderson, of the University of North Carolina, 
gave a delightful lecture on the evening of May 16th at St. Mary's on 
"Mark Twain as I Knew Him." 

The lecture was informal and bore largely on the speaker's personal 
acquaintance with Mr. Clemens, whom he first met on board ship as 
they were on the way to England. Dr. Henderson gave a striking pic- 
ture of the humorist as genial, democratic, submitting gayly to being 
lionized and photographed, and proving himself a tease as well as a 
humorist. He amusingly related Mark Twain's criticism of an article 
of his (Dr. Henderson's) then appearing in the Atlantic Monthly in 
which he teasingly referred to the author's youthful liking for long 
words ; Mark Twain said he had never before met such a splendid 
vocabulary outside of the English dictionary ; they were fine words, 
great words, he had underscored them, and promised to "run them in" 
in his future literary career. 

Dr. Henderson sjDoke of his visit to Mr. Clemens at Stormfield, 
where he found him charming, hospitable and unaffected, and as full of 
pranks as a boy. 

As to Mr. Clemens' literary standing, he ranks essentially as a 
moralist, and yet one who "makes you have a good time." 

Dr. Henderson ranks Mr. Clemens as truly a Southerner, yet whom 
the South is slow in claiming, for, he points out, his greatest works, 
Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, and Pudd'nhead Wilson, are all 
Southern and Southwestern. The stately Mississippi flows through 
all his greatest works, and the finest passage in his writings is a de- 
scription that the effect of the river had on him. That he had the 



The St. Maky's Muse. 219 

Southern reverence for women is shown in his wonderful tribute to 
Joan of Are, and that he understood women is shown in his glimpses 
of the Venetian ladies at their shopping and in his letters to the little 
actress, Elsie Leslie Lyle. 

Dr. Henderson proved himself thoroughly at home in the popular 
lecture, and delighted his audience from start to close. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



Jeanette Bruce had a visit from her brother on the 4th. 

Mary Butler's father spent the evening of May 3d with her. 

Bessie Erwin spent a clay and night at St. Mary's the last of April. 

Alice Hines, '10, reached St. Mary's on the 11th, and spent several 
days. 

Passie May Ottley spent a few hours at St. Mary's on the 20th of 
April. 

Lyde Palmer's two sisters were here on May 7th to spend a day and 
night with her. 

Blair Rawliners and her little sister visited Susan Rawlinffs on the 
27th and 28th. 

Bonner Williamson and Gertrude Brigham enjoyed visits from their 
mothers the latter part of April. 

Olive Smith was made hapjDy by a visit from her father, who came 
to say good-bye before leaving for England for the summer. 

Tinsley Harrison was here for several days during the early part of 
May on her way home from Xew York, where she has been studying 
Dramatic Art. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year a s = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies = * s = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1911-1912. 

Patset Harry Smith, Editor-in-Chief. 
Nellie Hendricks, Mart Hancock Owen, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart, Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, 

Elizabeth Hughes, Evelyn Cameron Maxwell, Susan Porter Rawlings. 

Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon, Business Manager. 
Caroline Clarke Jones, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



At last that month of the school year is upon us when excitement 
fills the very atmosphere. Indeed there are hard lessons to be studied 
and "horrible" examinations to be passed, yet how soon all anxieties 
will be over and all of us will be joining hands in making Commence- 
ment week a joyous one. 

There will be a certain amount of sadness in the hearts of all, not- 
withstanding the pleasures of the Commencement exercises and the 
anticipations of vacation days. But is not such a combination of joy 
and sorrow significant of a schoolgirl's feeling of loyalty to the friends 
to whom she bids farewell and to the school which she is leaving; ? 

While remembering the pleasures and advantages of the past year, 
amidst the anticipations of home-going and the consequent holiday 
festivities, let us for a moment become serious, while we determine 
to illustrate the gains made during this past year of mingled work and 
pleasure, by showing that we have learned, if not a consummate amount 
of knowledge, at least the importance of not valuing self above all else, 
but of seeking to better, truly better, self in rendering happy those with 
whom we come in contact. E. H. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 221 



Are You a Flopper? 



In turn it has been asked, "Are you a Bromide, a Sulphide, a Mol- 
lusk ?" but now an answer must be given to the question, "Are you a 
Flopper ?" A Flopper ! A hard and uncouth term surely ; what is 
meant by it ? Well, a Flopper is a person who flops, physically, 
mentally or morally. 

The number of Floppers is distressingly great. Oh, it is easy enough 
to detect them. Merely observe the Chapel line of mornings, the stand- 
ing attitude of those waiting for their mail, the postures in study hall 
and in classroom, and you will see physical Floppers of divers kinds. 
Not that flopping is restricted to. this school, for such is not the case. 
Floppers are to be found everywhere. Society abounds in them, just 
as it does in Mollusks and Parasites. 

Flopping is, though, a distinctly modern practice, and, as Life once 
pointed out, the modern modes of apparel are well adapted to it- 
butterfly waists and hobble skirts being impediments to upward and 
forward movements at least, and thus tending to conduce to flopping. 
Imagine, if such a thing is possible, our great-grandmothers in tight 
bodice and voluminous hoop skirts walking, standing, or sitting in the 
undeniably flopping manner of which we too frequently are guilty ! 

But there is a deeper and darker significance attached to being a 
Flopper than at first might be apparent. Although the physical Flop- 
per is anything but a pleasing and symmetrical sight, the outward ap- 
pearance of this displeasing habit is not the worst of its evils, for a 
physical Flopper, as a rule, soon becomes a mental Flopper, and one 
who has been a physical and mental Flopper finds no difficulty in be- 
coming a moral Flopper — one who ever uses some other person or 
something as a prop. 

Flopping, then, should most certainly be done away with, and if 
unconsciously or through ignorance we have been guilty of it, let us 
straightway mend our ways, learn to depend upon ourselves and on 
our own resources, both natural and acquired, and so keep from adding 
to the list of the deplorably many who if their ranks are greatly in- 
creased may give to our century the distasteful cognomen of "The 
Flopping Age." 



222 The St. Mary's Muse. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN— CLIPPINGS 



Jennie Woodruff and Laura M. Hoppe, Editors. 



It Certainly Is Incxplainable 

Things aren't just right, 

It seems to me 
That life is quite 

A mockery: 

For I love Nan 

And Nan loves Tim, 
And Tim loves Pan 

And Fan loves Jim. 

It's sure hard lines, 
For each one frets 

And pants and pines 
With vain regrets. 

For I love Nan 

And Nan loves Tim, 
And Tim loves Fan 

And Fan loves Jim. 

This thing's askew 

And should be straight. 
Here's what I'd do 

If I were fate: 

Make Nan love me 

(Since I love Nan,) 

And make Jim be 
In love with Fan. 

And as for Tim, 
Skidoo for him! 



An Apology for Girls 

Girls, girls! What is the use 
Of all their imperfection, 

Peachy looks, giggles and books, 
Romance and complexion? 

Only fit for photographs, 

Chocolate creams and lovers, 

Opera coats and anecdotes, 
And Harrison Fisher covers. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 223 

They're only fit for matinee's 

Or debutante cotillions, 
To boss their Pa's and worry their Ma's, 

And marry men with millions. 

They're only fit to turn the world 

From quite a wise and glum thing 
To a frivolous place of color and grace — 

Yet, after all, that's something! 

— Saturday Evening Post. 



Jungle Vaudeville 

'When a fire goes out, where does it go?" 

The monkey asked the ape. 
'Can't say," said the ape; "yet many's the time 

I've seen a fire-escape." 



'Twas in a restaurant they met, 
One Romeo and Juliet; 

'Twas there he first fell into debt, 
For Romeo'd what Juliet. 



Little grains of sawdust, 
Little strips of wood, 

Treated scientifically 
Make the breakfast food. 



English history puzzles me; 

I never could see why, 
With so many, many reigns, 

It still remains so dry. 



"Generally speaking, girls are — " "Are what?" "Generally speaking." 

If a train runs, does a boardwalk? 

If a department store had a sale, would a barbershop? 

If the trees left town, would they take their trunks with them? 

If a fly flees, does a flea fly? 

If a Plymouth Rock rooster had a toothache, would a Leghorn pullet? 

If Mary joined the suffragettes, would the cowcatcher or the peanut butter? 
No, but the kindling wood. 

If Benzoate one apple, how many has Marionette? 

Why is William Allen White? Because William Dean Howells every time 
John Kendrick Bangs the door. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Eknest Cruikshank ... - Alumnse Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

( Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - < Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

[Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 

President .... Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh. 

Vice-President ... - Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem. 



EDITORIAL 



Reports from the Raleigh, ]STew York, and Chapel Hill Chapters 
will be found in this issue. It is very much hoped that we shall hear 
from other chapters before the alumnse meeting on May 27th. At 
present the work of paramount importance for the general association 
is the completion of the $6,000 scholarship fund, which has not yet 
reached $2,000. Cooperation of the chapters is earnestly asked for. 
The election of officers will take place at this meeting. 



The Raleigh Chapter Luncheon 



The spring meeting of the Raleigh Chapter of the Alumnse Associa- 
tion was held at St. Mary's on May 13th, eighty-two members being 
present. A luncheon was given by the Rector of the school to the 
members of the Alumnse, which was enjoyable in every way. The 
guests all assembled in the parlor, and at one-thirty they were escorted 
by the Commencement Marshals to Clement Hall, where they found 
the girls' tables moved back toward the wall and the guest tables in 
the middle of the room. The girls were all in white, and the tables 
were charming with flowers. A delicious luncheon was served, and 
at the close after-dinner speeches were made, Mr. Lay acting as toast- 
master in his usual graceful style. 



The St. Maet's Muse. 225 

After Mr. Lay's words of welcome, Miss Annie Root spoke as presi- 
dent of the Raleigh Chapter. She mentioned the fact that the Raleigh 
members still felt that they were more or less under the care of St. 
Mary's still, by reason of their nearness. Mrs. Walter Grimes's sub- 
jest was the "St. Mary's Girls in the Country" — a plea for the coun- 
try's need of the St. Mary's girl, as well as the St. Mary's girl for the 
country. She was followed by Mrs. Chas. E. Johnson, who spoke on 
"The Honorary Members of the Alumna?," of which number she was 
glad to count herself. She gave an amusing and clever sketch of her 
own schoolgirl life and her "post-graduate course," begun at the mature 
age of sixteen. Mrs. Knox, as the president of the General Alumnae 
Association, then spoke, giving first of all a poem written by Rev. 
John Smedes in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding 
of St. Mary's, and following it by some words as to the club life and 
club work of women, as being a new field in which lie great oppor- 
tunities. 

Miss Patsey Smith, president of the Class of 1912, then spoke with 
much charm, giving the Alumnae a welcome on behalf of the school. 
The last speaker was Miss Czarnomska, who spoke with much feeling 
of the life and work of Dr. Bennett Smedes, under whom she served 
as Lady Principal. She also spoke of the desirability of electing a 
member of the Alumnae Association to serve on the Board of Trustees. 
At the close of her speech the guests and school rose and joined in sing- 
ing "Alma Mater." 

Meeting of the Raleigh Chapter 



The Raleigh Chapter held its second meeting of the year in the 
parlor at St. Mary's immediately after the luncheon in Clement Hall. 
The most important business transacted was the election of officers, in 
which Mrs. Thomas Ashe was chosen to succeed Miss Annie G. Root, 
as chairman, and Mrs. D. Elias and Mrs. "Watkins Robards were elected 
as members of the Governing Committee in succession to Mrs. Gilbert 
Crabtree and Miss Jennie Coffin. 

The secretary reported 186 members of the chapter, 82 being present. 



226 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The treasurer's report was read, and at the close it was voted that $50, 
which had been reserved for current expenses, be turned over to the 
General Alumnse Association for the scholarship. The report showed 
that a total of $303 had been turned over to the General Association 
since the meeting of November, 1911, $201 of this being receipts from 
the play "You Never Can Tell." 

Delegates to represent the Raleigh Chapter at the Commencement 
meeting were chosen — Mrs. Robert Strong, and Mrs. Charles Root. 

A motion was carried to urge that the Raleigh Chapter do all in its 
power to bring about the completion of the scholarship fund. 

There was discussion, led by Mrs. Timberlake, as to the advisability 
of a souvenir book being gotten out by the Alumnse in which to incorpo- 
rate all matters of interest and importance in the affairs of the Alumnse 
Association. There was also discussion as to a change in the dates of 
the two yearly meetings, and it was decided that the election of officers 
should take place in May instead of November. 

The Chapter then expressed themselves as favorable to the sugges- 
tion made to have a member of the Alumnse serve on the Board of 
Trustees. 

Resolutions were then made to thank Mr. Lay and the members of 
the Alumnse who spoke at the luncheon, after which the meeting ad- 
journed. 

The New YorK Chapter 



The following letter from the secretary of the New York Chapter 
gives an account of the fall and spring meetings of that Chapter. We 
would like to call the attention of the members of the Chapter to the 
list of officers of the General Association which appears in each Muse 
under the head "Alumnse Matters." A full report of the treasurer 
will be read at the Commencement meeting, and will be printed in the 
next issue of The Muse. The fund now in the hands of the treasurer 
is slightly over $1,900. The Alumnse Council at present has under 
consideration the investment of these funds in six per cent bonds. It 
is expected that the sum will certainly reach $2,000 by the meeting of 



The St. Mary's Muse. 227 

May 27th, and that that sum may be put into bonds. At present the 
money is drawing four per cent compound interest. 

"I am enclosing you in this letter my cheque for $34.25, collected from part 
payments on pledges and from dues, by the New York Chapter of St. Mary's 
Alumna? Association at our fall and spring meetings, November 18, 1911, and 
April 27, 1912. Both of these meetings were very interesting and very enthu- 
siastic, and we feel encouraged because of the genuine interest manifested by 
the majority of our members. I believe each Chapter is required to send in a 
brief account of its meetings, together with the treasurer's statement and 
amount of money due the general Association. As I am secretary and treasurer 
of our Chapter, I am sending both reports to you — hoping you will hand the 
secretary's report over to the proper person. 

"The Chapter was entertained at the fall meeting by Mary Baskerville, who 
is our president, and although rain prevented many from attending, still we 
transacted quite a good bit of business. Christine Busbee was chosen to fill 
the office of vice-president, since Caroline Means, our former vice-president, 
has gone to the Winthrop Normal College to fill a position. We were most 
fortunate in adding to our membership Mabel Hale, who is teaching in New 
York this winter and who is a most welcome addition. A committee com- 
posed of Miss Slater, Anne Moore, and Mabel Hale were appointed to draw up 
an amended constitution for our Chapter, to be presented for discussion and 
adoption at the spring meeting, and Christine Busbee was appointed to ascer- 
tain from the General Secretary how the Trustees of St. Mary's are elected, 
also the exact amount of money received by the Treasurer of the Scholarship 
Fund, how this fund is invested, and what interest it brings in. 

"It was also decided to empower our president to appoint two hostesses for 
each meeting, who might entertain the Chapter in their homes, or elsewhere 
as most convenient to them, the funds to cover expenses in case of the meeting 
being held otherwhere than in the homes of the hostesses to be paid out of the 
treasury of the New York Chapter. The necessity for this last decision arising 
from the fact that many of the members of our Chapter live outside of New 
York, and as some of us are thirty miles away, it is more convenient to hold 
our meetings in the city, where all find it both pleasant and convenient to 
attend, and of course those who entertain the Chapter in the city who are not 
residents of New York are obliged to find some place in which to hold the 
meeting. There were present at the fall meeting Mrs. Baskerville, Miss Slater, 
Mrs. Martin, Miss Christine Busbee, Miss Mabel Hughes, Miss Ethel Hughes, 
Mrs. Gilbert Smith, Miss Mabel Hale, and Mrs. E. B. Smedes, and Miss Gertrude 
Landis of Oxford, North Carolina, being a welcome guest. 

"The spring meeting was held at Miss Slater's studio, April 27, 1912, the 
Misses Hughes being hostesses on this occasion. Again the weather was most 
unpropitious, rain falling in torrents all day. However, the meeting itself was 
full of interest and a delightful afternoon was enjoyed, the cheer within making 
up for the gloom without. There were present Mrs. Baskerville, Miss Christine 
Busbee, Misses Hughes, Miss Mary Pride Jones, Miss Anne Moore, Miss Mary 



228 The St. Maey's Muse. 



Nash, Miss Florence Slater, Mrs. F. S. Weisse, Miss Louise Wickham, Miss 
Dorothea Young, Miss Mabel Hale, Miss Gertrude Landis, and Mrs. E. B. 
Smedes — fourteen in all. The various committees reported and the amended 
constitution was discussed and adopted. Printed copies of which, with a list 
of the members of the New York Chapter and their addresses to be distributed 
before the fall meeting, November, 1912. Miss Busbee made her report as to 
the approximate amount of the Scholarship Fund, and that it was being dis- 
cussed as to whether it would not be wise to invest the amount in an interest 
bearing bond. 

"Miss Slater was appointed to ascertain who is the present Treasurer of the 
General Association, and who has charge of the Scholarship Fund, and how it 
is being managed. 

"Mrs. Weisse was anxious to know if there was any officer of the General 
Alumna? Association whose duty it was to keep in touch with alumna? who 
have moved to distant points, and so have drifted away or have been unable to 
keep in touch with the life of the School. 

"Three new names were suggested as eligible to membership: Mrs. J. L. 
Seligman, New York; Mrs. Gilbert Eliot, Brooklyn; Mrs. Joseph Graef, New 
York. The secretary being instructed to notify the new members of their 
election. 

"Miss Dorothea Young was appointed chairman of a committee (to be selected 
by herself) to study ways and means to further the cause of the Scholarship 
Fund. 

"The fall meeting was set for the first Saturday in November, 1912. Miss 
Anne Moore and Mrs. E. B. Smedes being hostesses for that date. 

"The secretary was instructed to notify the Secretary of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation that it was the desire of the New York Chapter to be put on record at 
the meeting in Raleigh on May 12, 1912, as suggesting that the interest on the 
Scholarship Fund be equally divided and given to Mrs. Iredell and to Miss 
McKimmon now, instead of being turned back to the credit of the fund. 

"There being no further business, the remainder of the afternoon was spent 
in social intercourse. 

"We were all greatly interested to learn of the activities of the Raleigh 
Chapter, and the good amount it raised with its recent play, and we hope in 
some way to add to our funds in the future, although it is difficult to form any 
plan — as we live so far from each other and as twice a year seems as often as 
we can get together." 



The Chapel Hi" Chapter 



This Chapter, with the Raleigh and New York Chapters, is the only 
one from which the General Association has heard this year. The 
treasurer, Miss Venable, sent $6 in the fall and $1 in the spring. The 
Chapter is a small one, having only six members. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 229 



ALUMNAE NOTES 



Miss C. J. Czarnoinska, former Lady Principal of St. Mary's and 
afterwards of the Faculty of the English Departments of Smith Col- 
lege and Cincinnati University, has been visiting in Raleigh for a 
few weeks and has spent several days at St. Mary's. 

Mrs. C. L. Pridgen (Ua Rountree, '10) and Alice Hines, '10, have 
been recently at St. Mary's. They are planning a reunion of the Class 
of 1910 for this year. The class consists of eighteen members, and it 
is hoped that a large number may be present. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Bagby — Self 

[ From the News and Observer.] 

Hickory, April 20. — Attorney Chas. W. Bagby and Miss Frankie Self were 
quietly married yesterday at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. 
Self. Only a few near relatives and intimate friends of the bride and groom 
were present. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Dr. J. L. Murphy of the 
Reformed Church, who used the beautiful ceremony of that church. 

Miss Self is the charming daughter of Attorney W. A. Self, of this city, one 
of the leading lawyers of the State. She is a graduate of St. Mary's School, 
Raleigh. Mr. Bagby is a son of Rev. W. M. Bagby, of Montezuma, a rising 
young attorney and a member of the firm of Bagby & Blackwelder, of this city. 

The happy couple left for an extended trip to Washington, Baltimore, and 
New York. 



Graef— Ashe 
The marriage of Miss Josephine Ashe, daughter of Capt. S. A. Ashe, of this 
city, and Mr. Joseph E. Graef, of New York City, will be solemnized at Christ 
Church, Thursday evening, April 25, at 7 o'clock. 



Hinnant — Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Whitfield Taylor 

request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Nannie Davis 

to 

Mr. William King Hinnant 

on Thursday afternoon, the twenty-fifth of April 

at one o'clock 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church 

Beaufort, North Carolina 



230 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Shands — rlawKins 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hawkins 
request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Catherine London 

to 

Mr. William Augustine Shands 

on the evening of Wednesday, June the twelfth 

at half after six of the clock 

The Church of the Good Shepherd 

Jacksonville, Florida 

At home after July the fifteenth 

Gainesville, Florida 



READ !— M ARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 

Dry Goods of all kinds. Tailored Costumes, 
all kinds of Fancy Goods 



EAYETTEVILLE ASTD SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



More Wisdom Needed 
The fellow who brags of his college 

And all his great learning's a bore, 
The man who is proud of his knowledge 

Is badly in need of some more. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



' It's worth the difference " 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 


127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 


131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


Insurance Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Savings Bank 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON CO. 

COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOYS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



But Not so Many Tongues 
"A miss is as good as a mile," they say, 

But in one way it's not true. 
A mile has more than five thousand feet, 
And a miss has only two. 



NORFOLK 

OYSTERS 

DAILY 

Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St. Both Phones 356 

HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 



Good Things Always at 



BRETSCH's BAKERY 



J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Shoes 



Advertisements. 



WHY IS 

Brantley's Fountain 

The Most Popular? 

ASK THE GIRLS 

POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 
105 Fayetteville St. 

CARVER'S STABLES 

HARNESS AND SADDLE HORSES 
Phone 229 117 E. Davie St. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, R. S. BUSBEE, 

Secretary. General Manager. 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



There was a young lady named Flinn 
Who was so exceedingly thin, 

That when she essayed 

To drink lemonade, 
She slipped through the straw and fell in. 



t. ROSENTHAL 
SCO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



^fiDWARDS-V 



^& BROUGHToA\*} 
[fPRLNTLNG CO\W 



Advertisements. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 
MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 

OF RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital 8100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



C. E. HARTGE 



Architect 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones 



:{ 



174 
226 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 

ICE 

CREAM 

Phone 123 Cor. Salisbury & Hargett Sts. 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all makes repaired 



prom Bad to Verse 
Little drops of nonsense, 

Little grains of verse, 
Keep the pessimistic world 

From getting any worse. 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. PULLEN 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


THE HOTEL RAIEIGH 

INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 


ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 



Chab. E. Johnson F. H. Brioob 




PRESIDENT CASHIER 


^ CITIZENS .M 


THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round steps bank" since 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 


^T 


Jolly &• Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 


THOS. H. BRIGGS&.SONS. Raleigh, N. C.— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 


It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 
Garments at our store because we sell better goods 
for less money The Fashion 203-205 Fayetteville St. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 
millinery 


PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 


J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY- GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

222 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Good Philosophy 
If Eve had been afraid of snakes, 

As women are of mice, 
We shouldn't have had to pull up stakes 

And move from Paradise. 



WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 


Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 
Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 


DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON, DENTIST 

116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


Dr. M. C. HORTON 

DENTIST 


DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 


GREEN & WATSON Art Store 
11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

MUSIC HOUSE 


WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
217H Fayetteville Street Phone 953-R 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 

GYMNASIUM SHOES 


N. H. MOORE 
Repairer of Fine Shoes E. Hargett Street 


CARDWELL'S 
ALL KINDS OF CLEANING AND PRESSING 


BRIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. O Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located a t 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new Jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



St. Mary's Calendar 

Mat, 1912. 

May 1, Wednesday. May Day Exercises. 

May 4, Saturday. 

May 6, Monday. Certificate Recital. Miss Emilie Rose Knox, Violin. 

May 9, Thursday. Peace-St. Mary's Concert. 

May 11, Saturday. 

May 12, Sunday. Alumna? Day. Seventieth Anniversary of the Opening of 

St. Mary's. 
May 13, Monday. Alumnae Day Luncheon. 

Certificate Recital. Miss Susan Rawlings, Organ. 
May 16, Thursday. Ascension Day. Holy Day. 
May 18, Saturday. Orchestra Concert. 

May 20, Monday. Diploma Recital. Miss Zona May Shull, Voice. 
May 25-28, Saturday to Tuesday. Commencement Season. 



THE DEMOCRAT 

TENNESSEE'S GREATEST NEWSPAPER 

Accurate Market Reports All the World's Happenings 



NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



Location Central for the Carolina*. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C 

(for girls and young women) 

70th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1911. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1912. 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE. 

St. Mary's \ & THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these < ?« THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: j £ THE ART SCHOOL. 

\ 5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1911-12 are enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Redor. 



Wfyt 



&t. Jfflarp'* jWu*e 



June, 1912 



i 



&aleigf), J9L C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 
Vol. XVI. June, 1912. Xo. 10 

The Seventieth Commencement 



The Seventieth Commencement of St. Mary's, extending from Satur- 
day evening, May 25th, through Tuesday morning, May 28th, marked 
the introduction of the shortened Commencement season. For years and 
years St. Mary's girls have been graduating on Thursday and the Com- 
mencement program has extended from Sunday to Thursday, very 
pleasant in many ways, but rather trying in others. With this year 
Commencement Day became the last Tuesday in May. The new 
arrangement tended to increase the number of visitors and to keep 
'every one very well occupied during the close and it was generally pro- 
nounced a very satisfactory change. 

The weather conditions were excellent and every one was in good 
spirits at the conclusion of a successful year marked by many pleasant 
and very few untoward incidents, and all, members of the School and 
visitors, entered heartily into the Commencement festivities. 

On Saturday evening the Dramatic Club, under the able direction of 
Miss Davis, presented "The Taming of the Shrew" as the annual recital 
of the Elocution Department, an ambitious effort, well carried out, 

Sunday morning the Commencement Sermon was preached in the 
Chapel by the Rev. Dr. Alsop, of Brooklyn, X. Y., a clergyman high in 
the missionary councils of the Church, and was greatly appreciated by a 
large congregation. In the afternoon the Evening Service, very simple 
and St. Marylike, was called the Alumnse Service, being intended espe- 
cially for the Alumnse. 

The Class Day exercises Monday morning in the Grove, planned and 
developed under the artistic eye of Patsey Smith, were the most am- 



232 The St. Mary's Muse. 



bitious and the most effective yet undertaken in similar exercises, and 
gave a most representative class day. As the last strictly student meet- 
ing of the year they of course were tinged with an element of sadness 
lin saying good-bye to Miss Thomas, to whom as honorary member of 
the Class, as well as beloved lady-principal, the annual Muse was dedi- 
cated. The first copy of the 1912 Muse was presented to Miss Thomas 
in the exercises. 

At the Annual Alumnae Meeting in the Parlor Monday afternoon a 
number of matters of interest were discussed, and Mrs. R. W. Winston, 
of Raleigh, was elected President for the coming year. Miss Anna 
Buxton, of Winston, was reelected Traveling Secretary for the west, 
and Miss Annie Root, of Raleigh, was made Traveling Secretary for 
the east. 

The annual exhibit of the Art Department again reflected great credit 
on the pupils of the Department and the able direction of Miss Fenner, 
and was a pleasure to many visitors, while at night the Annual Concert 
of the Music Department was as usual a feature of the Commencement. 

The final exercises Tuesday morning were slightly marred by threat- 
ened rain, but passed off with the greatest spirit. The brief but effective 
Salutatory and Valedictory, the bright essay, the able address of Dean 
Graham, the usual announcement of promotions and awards, in the 
Auditorium ; the beautiful procession to the Chapel, the sweet parting 
service with the delivery of the diplomas and the farewell message from 
the Bishop of East Carolina, the Benediction and the Recessional, the 
familiar "Jerusalem High Tower!" and the Seventieth Commence- 
ment passed into a memory. 



The Beginning of Commencement 

(From the News and Observer.) 

The Commencement exercises of St. Mary's School began most auspiciously on 
Sunday morning, May 26th, when in St. Mary's Uhapel the baccalaureate sermon 
was preached by Rev. Rees F. Alsop, D.D., the Emeritus Rector of St. Anne's 
Church, of Brooklyn, L. I., and Honorary Canon of the Cathedral of the Incarnation 
at Garden City, L. I. 

Dr. Alsop was greeted by a congregation that filled the beautiful chapel, the 
sight being a most inspiring one, the students of St. Mary's forming a congrega- 



The St. Maby's Muse. 233 



tion of deeply interested young women, and besides these there were many visitors. 
The sermon of Dr. Alsop was a masterly one, elevating and inspiring. 

The services were conducted by Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, who read the les- 
sons of the day, and by Bev. George W. Lay, the rector of St. Mary's School. 

THE BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 

Following the singing of "Peace, Perfect Peace," Dr. Alsop announced as his text 
the sixth, seventh and eighth verses of the first chapter of the Acts of the Apostles, 
and the direct words "The Kingdom of Heaven is at Hand." In it he urged the 
young women to so live and act that their lives would be an inspiration and would 
aid in bringing to pass the growth of the kingdom of heaven. 

Dr. Alsop declared that the thought of the kingdom was that emphasized by John 
the Baptist, that this was the keynote when Jesus came, and that when Jesus went 
into the wilderness it was the thought of the kingdom of heaven that was upper- 
most, and that the three temptations were met by Him with a refusal to acknowl- 
edge any other kingdom. After this he began to preach to repent, for the kingdom 
of heaven is at hand. It is this thought in "The Lord's Prayer" when we say "Thy 
kingdom come," and the one underlying thought in our lives should be for the rule 
of God in our hearts. 

Jesus talked with His disciples of things pertaining to the kingdom of God, and 
He told them of the coming to them of the Holy Ghost. It was the baptism of 
tongues that came to the disciples in the upper room in which they waited, and it 
was from that company that there went out the teaching and the inspiration to the 
world. It was a little force to fling against the world, these few disciples, but they 
conquered, for a power greater than they was at work. 

Dr. Alsop urged that all have a motive in life, and that the young women of St. 
Mary's go out with a motive for the bettering of life, to make their lives a power 
for good, to be of service in their homes and to the world at large. "Let your lights 
shine," he urged, and quoted the words of Portia: 

"How far that little candle throws its beam ! 
So shines a good deed in a naughty world." 

Dr. Alsop continued by showing how great an influence a good and true life could 
have. He urged his hearers, in concluding his most able sermon, to do service for 
God, and for Jesus Christ, who had suffered and died for the bringing of the 
kingdom. 

THE ALUMNAE SERMON. 

At the customary Sunday evening service at 5 o'clock at St. Mary's the seating 
capacity of the Chapel was filled to its utmost, when the long procession of girls, 
all in white, marched in singing that fine old hymn of Bishop Doane's "Ancient of 
Days." 

Before and after the Rector's short address there were special anthems by the 
choir— "Oh for a Closer Walk With God," by Foster, and "The Radiant Morn Hath 
Passed Away," by Woodward. 



234 The St. Maky's Muse. 



Mr. Lay took as the keynote of his last Sunday evening's message to the girls 
the parable of the merchant who bought the pearl of great price, showing that we 
should all have an outlook on life and be on the quest for the kingdom. Pearls, 
he said, are often found in the most unattractive, forbidding looking oyster shells, 
and so among people whose lives seem gross and evil, there are good traits or kind 
thoughts that can be found by searching for them. We are prone to find the evil; 
it is well to cultivate the habit of finding the good. Again the successful merchant 
discriminates, he looks not only for pearls, but for the best pearls, and knows how 
to prize them when found. Look out then for the good qualities in others, and com- 
pare those qualities so as to seek the best. 



Class Day Exercises 

(From the News and Observer.) 

Following in order upon the baccalaureate sermon and the alumnae sermon came 
the Class Day Exercises on Monday morning, May 27th. Promptly at 11 o'clock, 
while friends and relatives waited in the shade of the old oaks, the prr ession of 
girls, each one dressed in white, bearing the colors and flowers of the various classes, 
circled around the corner of West Rock Building singing the St. Mary's School 
song. Stopping at the walk leading from the Main Building, the column of twos 
divided, leaving a long lane between. Each couple raised above their heads a gar- 
land of flowers and colors, thus forming a continuous arch, under which the Seniors 
marched with their chain of daisies. Before going further the Seniors, accompanied 
by Miss Margaret Erwin on the violin, sang their class song, written to the tune of 
"John Brown's Body." It was a pretty picture here, the group of girls with their 
flowers, the red and white colors of the Freshmen, the black and gold of the Sopho- 
mores, the lavender and purple of the Juniors, and the green and white of the 
Seniors. 

At the conclusion of the singing the class mascots, little Misses Lucy Lay and 
Adelaide Boylston, pushing before them a butterfly representing the frivolity of the 
Class of 1912, led the way to the seats arranged for the Seniors. Arising from her 
chair as president, Miss Patsey Smith welcomed the guests in a brief word of greet- 
ing. Following the class song of the Freshmen, Miss Nellie Hendricks read the 
class history, in which she wittily recorded the St. Mary's life of each girl. The 
class prophecy was recited by Elizabeth Hughes, who in clever rhyme pictured the 
different members of the Senior class as she fancied them. The prophecy included 
a long range of activities, the members of the class starring in the future as prima 
donnas, tambourine artists, philosophers, theologians, cattle queens, missionaries, 
and old maids. 

Miss Margaret Broadfoot, in a very clever manner, recited the class poem. 

Perhaps the most amusing part of the exercises was the reading of the class will 
by Miss Fannie McMullan. Among other gifts she gave Mr. Lay a tie to bind 
together the broken pieces of the school after the departure of the present class. 



The St. Maet's Muse. 235 



To the day students she gave a bottle of school spirits and a miniature street car to 
set them to school on time. 

Just here Miss Patsey Smith fittingly presented a copy of the Annual Muse to 
Miss Eleanor \Y. Thomas, another to Mr. Lay for his generous and kind interest, 
and still another to Bishop Cheshire for his assistance in all their undertakings. 
To this last presentation Bishop Cheshire arose and in his characteristic way 
expressed his appreciation, assuring this class and all other classes of his continued 
interest. 

An amusing incident was the attempt of the Seniors to burn the butterfly repre- 
senting their frivolity. It was only after the application of a great many matches 
that the Seniors succeeded in accomplishing this difficult feat. 

The exercises were concluded with two toasts to the Class of 1912, one from the 
Sophomores and one from the Juniors. 

ALUMNAE MEETING. 

At 4:30 p. m. was the annual meeting of the alumnae of the school. In the neces- 
sary absence of Mrs. A. W. Knox, Mrs. H. W. Jackson presided over the meeting. 
After a prayer the Rector of the school made a short talk. Then the business of 
the year was taken up. At this meeting only the routine work of an ordinary 
business meeting was indulged in. 

ABT EXHIBIT. 

The art exhibit at 4:30 was one of the features of the afternoon. The display of 
sketches, charcoal drawings, modeling work, pencil drawing and water sketches 
reflects great credit on Miss Clara Tenner, the head of the department, and on the 
students. The pencil work was taken principally by the small children in the Pre- 
paratory Department who have one lesson a week. Miss Laura Margaret Hoppe, 
of Marietta, Ga., deserves special mention for the good work done along this line. 

The stencil work was very attractive. The students taking this make original 
designs and it proves very useful in decorative work. Miss Beverly DuBose, of 
Columbia, S. C, and Miss Evelyn Maxwell, of Jacksonville, Fla., exhibited very 
pretty flower sketches as a sample of this year's work. In the charcoal drawings 
Miss Elizabeth A. Lay had some very good groups of cast drawings on exhibition. 
In the more advanced charcoal work Miss Harriette Lamer, of Tampa, Fla., has 
shown wonderful talent and ability. Her drawings of the Winged Victory hints 
of the truth of a future artist. 

Miss Patsey Smith, of Raleigh, who takes her certificate in the full course, has 
some beautiful water color exhibits, sketches from nature, and time sketches which 
were done in about two to four hours. 

Miss Fenner has accomplished wonders in her department. It is a pleasure and 
privilege to have seen her exhibit. 



236 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Annual Concert 

(From the News and Observer.) 

The one word to characterize the concert at 8:30 in the evening is "variety." 
Without a doubt it was the most thoroughly successful and representative of any- 
thing of the sort attempted in recent years. The opening and closing numbers, both 
choruses, were very attractive features. The opening "Trust in the Lord," "Largo," 
Handel, with Miss Eleanor Mann at the piano, Miss Bertha Luney at the organ, 
Miss Emilie Hose Knox, violin obligato, was striking. The ease and absence of all 
effort showed careful training. 

Miss Sarah Fenner, in "Scherzo in E Minor," from Mendelssohn, displayed an 
easy and fluent technique, with a true appreciation of the composer's purposes. Miss 
Lucy Dortch, in her two French songs, "Les Violons de l'Automne," by de Koven, 
and "Les Jeunes Fillettes," was happy and spirited. Miss Margaret Erwin was 
delightful in her rendering of "Canzonetta," of d'Ambrosio, and the "Evening Star," 
from Tannhauser. Her tone was beautiful. 

Miss Amelia Sturgeon, in a thoroughly appreciative way, rendered three selec- 
tions from Raff. She showed thorough mastery of the piano in her interpretation 
of numbers that demanded much of the musician's art. Miss Kate Smith, with the 
half chorus in "Habanera," from "Carmen," Bizet, displayed a remarkably clear 
enunciation. She was at her best in "A Swan," from Grieg. Miss Emily Rose Knox 
showed clearly that she is the master of her violin. The tone, the beauty, the power 
of her "Romanze," by Heitsche, show her to be an artist of the first rank. At her 
best with a clear lyric soprano in all its beauty and flexibility, Miss Zona Shull 
quite captivated the audience in Victor Herbert's "Aria," from "Natoma." 

One of the features of the evening was the string quartette. The musicians were 
Misses Blanche Crafts, Fannie Hines Johnson, Emilie Rose Knox and Margaret 
Erwin. 

At the piano Miss Lina Lockhart, in a clear and brilliant way, excellently rendered 
the "Concerto in G. Minor," by Mendelssohn. 

The program closed with the chorus "O, Lovely Night," Offenbach, with Miss 
Eleanor Mann at the piano, and Miss Emilie Rose Knox, violin obligato. 



PROGRAMME 
Part I. 

1. Trust in the Lord — "Largo" Handel 

Chobxjs 
Miss Eleanor Mann at the piano 
Miss Bertha M. Luney at the organ 
Miss Emilie Rose Knox, violin obligato 

2. Scherzo in E minor Mendelssohn 

Miss Sarah Fenner 

3. (a) Les Violons de l'Automne de Koven 

( b ) Les Jeunes Fillettes Old French 

Miss Lucy Dortch 



The St. Mary's Muse. 237 



4. (a) To the Evening Star, from "Tannhauser" Hull-week 

( b ) Canzonetta, Op. 6 d'Ambrosio 

Miss Margaret Erwin 

5. Preludes Heller 

(a) "Im Genre Teniers" (vivacissimo) , 

(b) "Little Serenade/' 

(c) Etude Melodique Raff 

Miss Amelia Sturgeon 

6. Habanera, from "Carmen" Bizet 

Miss Kate Smith and Semi-Chorus 

First Soprano Second Soprano 

Miss Kate Smith Miss Amy Winston 

Miss Marguerite Plakely Miss Zona Shull 

Miss Penelope Gallup Miss Gertrude Brigham 

Miss Frances Lilly Miss Elizabeth Tarry 

Miss Carrie Cleaton Miss Susanne Pusbee 

Alto 
Misses Kate Leak, Margaret Erwin, Fredrika Gilbert 

PROGRAMME 

Part II. 

1. String Quartette 

(a) Romanze Hellene sbergh 

(b) "Annie Laurie" (arr. for violins by Miss Crafts), 

Misses Blanche L. Crafts, Fannie Hines Johnson, Emllie 
Pose Knox, and Margaret Erwin 

2. Concerto, in G minor Mendelssohn 

Molto Allegro 

Miss Lina Lockhart 

Orchestral parts on second piano, Miss Luney 

3. (a) The Time of May Mary Turner Salter 

( b ) A Swan Grieg 

Miss Kate Smith 

4. (a) Romanze Heitsche 

( b ) Rezeda . Friml 

Emllie Rose Knox 

5. Aria, from "JMatoma" Victor Herbert 

Miss Zona Shull 

6. O Lovely Night, from "Les Contes d'Hotfinann" Offenbach 

Chorus 
Miss Eleanor Mann at the piano 
Miss Emilie Rose Knox, violin obligato 



238 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The Rector's Reception 

After the Annual Concert on Monday, the Rector's Reception was 
held in the School Parlor, which was tastefully decorated for the occa- 
sion. The receiving line was composed of the Rector and Mrs. Lay, 
Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire, Miss Thomas, the Lady Principal, Miss 
Kate McKimmon, the heads of Departments, and the graduating class. 

Ice cream and cake was served by members of the Freshman Class. 

Among the out-of-town guests present for Commencement were Rt. 
Rev. Robert Strange, D.D., Wilmington; Dr. Reece F. Alsop, of 
Brooklyn, and Mrs. Alsop ; Dr. R. B. Drane, of Edenton ; Hon. John 
Hendricks, of Marshall, F. C. ; Rev. T. T. Walsh, of Yorkville, S. C. ; 
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Erwin, of Durham ; Miss Isabel Perry, Miss Hor- 
tense Jones, Miss Anna Buxton, Miss Mary M. McMullan, Miss Eliza- 
beth Leary. Misses Reba Shields, Alice Noble, Ruth Mardre, Lena 
Everett, of the Class of 1910 (at the School for a Class reunion) ; Mrs. 
H. H. McLendon, Wadesboro ; Mr. D. Y. Cooper, Henderson ; Rev. 
T. P. ISToe, Wilmington ; Mr. P. T. Hayne, Greenville, S. C. 



The Graduating Exercises and Address 

(From the News and Observer.) 

The crowning event of the whole year's work was Tuesday, May 28th, at St. 
Mary's. It was the final day of the celebration of the seventieth Commencement of 
the school. It was, in every way, a joyous occasion. The school girls, their friends 
and relatives, all entered into the spirit of the time, and nothing occurred to mar 
the success of the exercises. 

Promptly at 11 o'clock Dr. G. W. Lay announced to the waiting friends who rilled 
all available space in the Auditorium of the school, the first number on the pro- 
gram, a piano solo — "La Saxonne," by Godard. The musician was Miss Ruth 
Douglas, and she played in a thoroughly artistic manner. 

As salutatorian of the class, Miss Lina Ashe Lockhart extended a graceful wel- 
come to the visitors, schoolmates, faculty and trustees. She was very happy in the 
expression of the salutatory spirit. 

Here again the program came under the spell of the musician's art, when Miss 
Marguerite Blakely charmingly sang the two little numbers, "Parting," by Sgamboli, 
and "Go, Lovely Rose," by Spross. 

The class essay, next read by Miss Margaret Strange Broadfoot, was of an un- 
usual nature. Chosen from a large number submitted by members of the class, it 
was declared to be by many in the audience far the best thing of its kind heard 
recently. The subject was "The Mission of Humor." The essayist, with an airy 



The St. Maey's Muse. 239 



style, light touch, and splendid rhetoric, contrasted the humorist with those Avho 
are lacking in this sense. Those who possess the gift of humor look upon life from 
a different viewpoint from those who do not, and who create an atmosphere of bore- 
dom from which they can not escape. She gave illustrations of her point, contrasting 
Jack Falstaff and Malvolio, of Shakespearean creation. In real humor, she declared 
there is a touch of sympathy, a responsive feeling for the real tragedy of Hamlet 
was in this very particular. 

The honor of valedictorian this year went to Miss Patsey Smith, of Raleigh. Her 
address was a gem of beautiful thought and expression. There was, she said, a' 
sorrow of parting, yet a gladness for the accomplishment of the school days and 
the completion of the preparation for life. She expressed the loyalty of the class 
for the alma mater with the pledge to keep the faith. 

Mr. Lay here announced the winners of the college honors and the promotions in 
the various classes. 

DR. GRAHAM SPEAKS. 

The Commencement address was delivered by Dr. Edward Kidder Graham, Dean 
of the University, who spoke less than half an hour and without manuscript. 

Those who had been robbed of the delight of hearing him all of his growing years 
at the University since he issued from it as a schoolboy, were pleased anew to see to 
what splendid employment his native wit and humorous speech could be put. It was 
his sarcastic humor that overthrew Georgia in the second of the intercollegiate 
debates. Yesterday he was superb. His English was charming and his subject- 
matter worthy entirely of a young man accomplishing as much for the generation 
in which he lives as anybody who does live. 

Dr. f Graham was presented by Rev. George W. Lay. The subject was announced 
as "Present Visions and Future Tasks." He confessed to some difficulty in speaking 
to the young women. He quoted a great man who hesitated about speaking to a 
school of young women on the ground that he did not know what would interest 
them. The Commencement orator knew what would interest men, he was one of 
them, but women were concerned solely with dress, and the orator knew nothing of 
that. Some one made the simple suggestion that he speak to them as though they 
were human beings, the first time that anybody had ever done such a thing. 

From the study world of Athens and Alexander the students are to go now. They 
leave the heights of academic perfection and commiserate with John Smith upon the 
high cost of living while playing neighbor to Mrs. Smith upon terms of social 
equality. The study doors are opening upon a new life; it is not strange that artists 
and poets should make this one of their supreme subjects. 

THE HAPPIEST OF MEN. 

The happiest of men is the one who lives the most interesting life, Dr. Graham 
said, not the man who thinks merely the happiest thoughts. There is more to do 
than think. And this life is all the happier when the strong visions of youth are 
preserved. He spoke of his dear friend, Dr. Kemp Battle, who retains his youth 
and has lived through a transformation of civilization. "He has lived through the 

2 



240 The St. Mary's Muse. 



transformation of civilization. Since he was a boy the first steamship has crossed 
the ocean, the first telegram sent, the first electric light made, the first telephone 
invented. He is not growing old, he remains young, he takes an interest in the life 
about him and plants fruit trees." 

That was a fine personality to point to, Dr. Battle. The college woman or man 
has nothing better for a commencement address. It carries the suggestion that to 
avoid becoming old while they are young, they must escape a life lived for small 
things and spent in trilling performances. He is the John Wesley type, the Mosaic 
man, for when each came to die his sight was not dimmed and his natural force 
was unabated. The grand old man of Carolina is the youngest man in the faculty 
right now. He has kept out trivialities and flamed with some purpose. 

And it must have been this great and good man in the speaker's mind when he 
spoke of the vital and strong visions of youth, undimmed and loyal to life. "If 
one might retain the visions of youth, we might realize immortality here," he said. 

The tragedy of disenchantment comes in the contemplation of the commonplace 
things, the change from the academic to the practical world. But there is work 
to be done. Democracy needs a new interpretation and the happy and efficient man 
accepts the proclamation of the world as to his worth and sets about the task of 
giving to the world some expression of himself. He declared that Democracy is not 
a question of sex but one of interest. 

Everything is in the future. In a recent magazine there appeared 57 wonders of 
the world, and the readers were asked to pick out seven. The seven chosen by the 
learned men were: Wireless telegraphy, chemistry, radium, anti-toxin, aviation, 
the Panama Canal and the telephone. They have been in the recent past, and the 
world is young. One of the greatest questions he had debated in his college career 
was, "Are All Men Good, or Are All Men Bad?" in other words, are all men white 
with black spots, or are they all black with white spots? He went further and 
showed why all people were alike only in the little differences, and those little differ- 
ences were what made the larger differences in the world, as an example that one 
little touch in the way a girl dresses her hair will make a little difference that will 
be noticeable, and that if the little differences in the physical world will matter 
that much, what will the effect be in the spiritual world? Professor Graham closed 
with a few remarks to the class that is going out into the world and the future, 
and told them of the difference in their present visions and the future tasks. It 
was a most masterful address. 



Honors, Certificates, and Distinctions 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

The following pupils having passed satisfactory examinations in the Third Year 
of the Primary Department, are entitled to promotion to the Preparatory Depart- 
ment: Elizabeth Murray Cross, Florence Leftwich Harrison, Anna Rogers Lay, 
Lucy Fitzhugh Lay, Susan Linehan, Lillias McDonald Shepherd, Virginia Royster. 

The following pupils are to be commended: 



The St. Mary's Muse. 241 



For Good Work in the First Year — Adelaide Snow Boylston, Mary Strange 
Morgan. 

For Excellent Work in the Third Year — Mary McBee Hoke, Florence Leftwich 
Harrison. 

For Attendance (no absence during 1911-12) — Lillias McDonald Shepherd. 

For Industry, and Unfailing Courtesy in Deportment — Elizabeth Murray Cross. 

Roll of Honor— Elizabeth Whitely Baker (96.4), Elizabeth Woolcott (94), Ran- 
dolph Isabel Hill (92.7), Virginia Page Royster (91.6), Sallie Taliaferro Cameron 
(91.4). 

CERTIFICATES IX THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

Teacher's Certificates — In Piano : Zona May Shull, Missoula, Mont. ; Amelia 
Pinkney Sturgeon, Gary, N. C. 

Regular Certificates — In Piano : Sarah Baker Fenner, Raleigh, N. C. 
In Violin: Emilie Rose Knox, Raleigh, N. C. 
In Organ : Susan Porter Rawlings, Wilson, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES IN THE ART DEPARTMENT. 

Patsey Harry Smith, Raleigh, N. C. 

CERTIFICATES IN THE BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

Full Certificates — Elsie Marguerite Brown, Boston, Mass.; Georgie Bond Fuller, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

In Stenography and Typewriting — Margie Menchen King, Raleigh, N. C. ; Myrtle 
King, Raleigh, N. C. ; Bessie Fitzhugh Peace, Watha, N. C. ; Josephine Pearl Ton- 
noffski, Raleigh, N. C. ; Annie Herndon Willson, Raleigh, N. C. 

In Bookkeeping — Marie Justis Curtice, Raleigh, N. C. ; Martha Gold Winstead, 
Mullins, S. C. 

ACADEMIC PROMOTIONS. 

In the College the promotions were: 

To be Seniors — Susannah Steele Busbee, Mary Brown Butler, Caroline Clarke 
Jones, Alice Loretta Lacy, Margaret Agnes Leard, Evelyn Croom Maxwell, Mary 
Hancock Owen, Bessie Peele White, Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff. 

To be Juniors — Elizabeth Melton Cherry, Laura Placidia Clark, Sophronia Moore 
Cooper, Sarah Baker Fenner, Sallie Kirk Heyward, Laura Margaret Hoppe, Ellen 
Armistead Johnson, Rebecca Devereux Kyle, Kathryn Blount Lassiter, Melba Mc- 
Cullars, Susan Porter Rawlings, Kate Hale Silver, Josephine Valentine Smith, 
Myrtle Warren, Amabel Conyers Winston. 

To be Sophomores — Julia Washington Allen, Margaret Huntingdon Bottum, Emma 
Bettis Bouknight, Fannie Spottswood Cooper, Julia Horner Cooper, Grace Kearney 
Crews, Ruth Douglas, Mary Franklin Graves, Alice Gibson Harris, Sue Arrington 
Kitchin, Elizabeth Atkinson Lay, Mattille Irwin Magee, Lucinda Galloway Martin, 
Elizabeth Quarles Kicolson, Helen Read Peoples, Agnes Reese, Julia Staton Rowe, 
Kate Watson Smith, Mary Clark Smith, Ruth Walker Smith, Florence Douglas 



242 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Stone, Frances Lambert Strong, Elizabeth Anderson Tarry, Anne Page Turpin, 
Frances Warner Walker, Virginia Windham, Nellie Robbins Wood. 

To be Freshmen — Marion Alston, Dorothy Nottingham Hopkins, Margaret Calvert 
Jordan, Eliza Whitlield Palmer, Lois Pugh, Sallie Bett Quinerly, Ruth Rosser, 
Rosalie Wilkinson, Elinor Furniss Williams, Helen Cherry Wright. 

THE HONOE EOLL OF 1911-12. 

In the College — Mary Brown Butler, Ruth Walker Smith, Patsey Harry Smith, 
Myrtle Warren, Julia Washington Allen, Josephine Valentine Smith, Susannah 
Steele Busbee, Alice Loretta Lacy, Helen Read Peoples, Laura Placidia Clark, 
Lucinda Galloway Martin, Ellen Armistead Johnson, Alice Gibson Harris, Elise 
Gordon Stiles, Frances Lambert Strong. 

In the Upper Preparatory Department — Elinor Furniss Williams. 

In the Lower Preparatory Department — Bessie McMorine Folk. 

THE BISHOP PAEKEE BOTANY PEIZE. 

This prize, given by the Rt. Rev. Edward M. Parker, Bishop Coadjutor of New 
Hampshire, is awarded to that pupil who, in accordance with certain published con- 
ditions, does the best work in the preparation of an herbarium. The prize in 1912 
was awarded to Elizabeth Atkinson Lay. 

THE NILES MEDAL. 

The Niles Medal, the highest scholastic honor of the school, was won by Miss 
Mary Brown Butler, of Henderson, N. C, with an average of 96.4. The certificates 
of the various departments were then presented. 

PBOCESSION TO THE CHAPEL. J 

The visitors then proceeded to the College Chapel for the completion of the exer- 
cises. With the processional hymn, "Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand," the 
Seniors marched in, accompanied by the whole student body, the faculty and the 
trustees in a long column of twos. The Scripture lesson was Joel, second chapter, 
from the twenty-first verse to the end. After the Benedictus, the Creed, Prayers 
and the hymn "Ancient of Days," the diplomas were presented by the Bishop of 
North Carolina, who is also the President of the Board of Trustees. The academic 
graduates were eight in number and there was in addition one diploma in voice. 
They were as follows: 

THE GBADUATES — THE COLLEGE CLASS OF 1912. 

Frances Raney Bottum, Asheville; Margaret Strange Broadfoot, Fayetteville ; 
Elizabeth Hughes, Raleigh; Nellie Hendricks, Marshall; Caroline Ashe Lockhart 
(second honor), Wadesboro; Fannie Old McMullan, Elizabeth City; Patsey Harry 
Smith (first honor), Raleigh; Anna Cowan Strong, Raleigh. 

Diploma in Voice — Zona May Shull, Missoula, Mont. 

In a few final words of advice Bishop Strange, of Wilmington, made the address 
to the graduates. There were three thoughts he wished to leave with every mem- 



The St. Mast's Muse. 243 



ber of the class. First, to go forward, to accept the motto "En Avant" 
as their motto, and in times of hesitation and doubt to look back upon the Holy 
Writ, upon Moses and the children of Israel in the wilderness, and take encourage- 
ment to proceed with the tasks before them. The second was to keep the faith; and 
the way to do this thoroughly is by self-denial and prayer; and lastly, to enter 
into and each to do his part of the work of the world. 

This marked the end of the exercises. The proud graduates marched out bearing 
their diplomas and the school singing "Jerusalem, High Tower." 

O gladsome day, and yet more gladsome hour! 

When shall that hour have come, 
When my rejoicing soul its own free power 

May use in going home? 
Itself to Jesus giving, 

In trust to His own hand, 
To dwell among the living 

In that blest Fatherland. 

The long column proceeded down the path in front of the Main Building, where 
it was finally dismissed. Thus closed the exercises attendant upon the celebration 
of the seventieth Commencement of St. Mary's School. Today the Seniors of yes- 
terday are alumnae. With their diplomas, their flowers, the good will of school- 
mates, faculty, and friends, they are going home. 

THE COMMENCEMENT MARSHALS. 

Much credit for the success of Commencement was due to the Commencement 
Marshals, of whom Miss Amy Winston, of Ealeigh, was chief, ably assisted by 
Miss Susan Porter Rawlings, of Wilson; Miss Margaret Erwin, of Durham; Miss 
Janie DuBose, of Columbia, S. C. ; Miss Jennie Woodruff, of Summerville, S. C. ; 
Miss Mary Hancock Owen, Guatemala; Miss Margaret Bottum, Asheville. 



The Elocution Recital 

Saturday Night, May 25th. 
(From the Raleigh Times.) 

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW. 

"The Taming of the Shrew," presented by the Dramatic Club of St. Mary's, under 
the direction of Miss Florence Davis, in the College Auditorium Saturday night, was 
a decided success and was attended by a crowd that filled the Auditorium to the 
doors. The stage was skillfully arranged to represent the stage of a Shake- 
spearean play as it would have been in Shakespeare's day, with little scenery or 
stage effects. The costumes were elaborate and gorgeous, altogther making a bril- 
liant scene on the stage. 

There was an absence of stiffness in the acting of the young ladies that waa 
especially pleasing, their presentation being simple, free and unaffected. In the 



244 The St. Mart's Muse. 



part of "Baptista" Miss Elizabeth Tarry was very good; Miss Fredrika Gilbert, as 
"Petruchio," was unusually good; while Miss Mary Owen, as "Katharina," the 
shrew, played her difficult part splendidly. In fact all the parts were well pre- 
sented, each one deserving of special notice. 

DRAMATIS PEBSONAE 

Baptista, a rich gentleman of Padua Elizabeth Tabby 

Vincentio, an old gentleman of Pisa Maude Reynolds 

Ltjcentio, son to Vincentio, in love with Bianca Maegabet Botttjm 

Petbuchio, a gentleman of Verona, a suitor to Katharina Feedbika Gllbebt 

Hoetensio i ( Haeeiette Laeneb 

Gbemio \ Suitors to Bianca j Fbances Pinnix 



Teanio j _ _ , . ( Lois Ptjgh 

t, I Servants to Lucentio l _, 

Biondello ) \ Julia Coopeb 

Gbumio \ / Geetchen Gaylobd 

Cubtis / \ Lyde Palmeb 

Geegoey \ Servants to Petruchio A Lauea Claek 

Nathaniel \ J Elizabeth McKenzie 

Philip J I Julia Allen 

A Tailoe Sue May DeVisconti 

The Cook Katheeine Pendeb 

Kathabina, the shrew "j Daughters ( Maby Owen 

Bianca j to Baptista 1 Geeteude Bbigham 

Widow Jeanette Bbuce 

!Iewin Magee 
Rosalie Wilkinson 
Maby C. Smith 
Act I. Padua. Before Hortensio's house. 
Act 11. Padua. Baptista's garden. 
Act III. Padua. Before Baptista's house. 
Act IV. Sc. 1. A room in Petruchio's house. 

Sc. 2. Padua. Before Baptista's house. 
Sc. 3. A room in Petruchio's house. 
Act V. Sc. 1. Padua. Before Lucentio's house. 
Sc. 2. Room in Lucentio's house. 

Music by St. Mary's Orchestra. 

Mb. R. Blinn Owen, Conductor. 

synopsis. 

Baptista has two daughters, Katharina and Bianca. The latter, because of her 
gentleness and charm, has many admirers; but her father will not listen to any of 
them until Katharina is married. This event seems doubtful on account of her 



The St. Mary's Muse. 245 



shrewish disposition. Consequently the many suitors of Bianca are in despair until 
the arrival of one Petruchio, who, not discouraged by the reports of Katharina's 
temper, and having heard of her beauty and her wit, resolves to tame her into a 
meek and manageable wife. He presently obtains her father's consent to his suit. 
He then woos her in a most singular fashion, overriding all her harshness and dis- 
dain with the command that they shall be married the following Sunday. Immedi- 
ately after the ceremony he departs for home with his bride, a move which is much 
against her will. She first entreats, then storms. However, after a time she forgets 
her own arbitrary disposition in the desire to keep his temper even. At last she 
learns that this deportment of Petruchio is but feigned and only his method of 
changing her disposition. Thus Katharina is brought from a "wild Kate to a Kate 
conformable as other household Kates." 



Salutatory of 1912 

Each year it falls to the part of some one in the Graduating Class to 
welcome friends and visitors to the last exercises of the term. This year 
this, which is not more a duty than a pleasure, has fallen to my lot. 

Although the mere words I may say will probably sound trite, yet I 
can only hope that each one of you here will feel that there lies behind 
them the true spirit of cordiality, when I, in behalf of the Class of 1912, 
welcome you here — visitors, Trustees, parents, our Bishop, our esteemed 
Rector, our beloved Lady-Principal, the honorary member of our Class ; 
the Faculty, who has helped us through these years of work and fun, 
and, finally, our fellow-students with whom we have worked and played. 

To each and every one, we, as a class, hold out our hands in heartiest 
greeting. 

The Class Essay 

If a simple recipe for enjoyment was offered to the vast throng of 
humanity in this great world of our, would they not eagerly seize it ? 
Would they not grasp it frantically, these fellow-mortals ? These throb- 
bing, pulsing, jostling masses ; consisting alike of majesty in its earthly 
imperialness, and that higher supremacy of thought and intellect; of 
kings and queens, philosophers and sages, scientists, adventurers, barons 
of wealth and lovers of people, and even those simpler folk, who consti- 
tute such an important part in the bearing of the never-ending problems, 
and the vexing cares of their fellow-men, and who seems to stand always 



246 The St. Mary's Muse. 



and unceasingly with their shoulder to the wheel. If, I say, a recipe 
for enjoyment was offered to them, one which entailed few ingredients, 
and those easily obtained and mixed, and which would day by day act 
as a tonic, a restorer, and a substance to build up the tisses so necessary 
for the easing of the world's burden, would they not seize, grasp, aye, 
clutch it even, in an iron grip ; cry fervently, "Let us keep it, let us 
keep it" ? 

Would they not, too, first appear as a sleepy, blinking, surprised and 
lastly astounded crowd, if some one gently intimated, and finally thun- 
dered the fact in their ears, that however unconscious they may seem to 
be, they do possess just this very recipe. 

Strong, powerful, and curative it is : the sense of Humor. The sense 
which can not adequately be defined, because of its great comprehensive- 
ness ; the sense which, while unlike those bodily ones of sight, sound, 
taste, and hearing, yet seems to encompass all four of these material ones 
into a new and different kind ; and a kind which is vitally necessary to 
the mind, the heart, and the soul of men. Vitally necessary, because, like 
an exquisite melody, emanating from the soul of a musician, it creates 
an oblivion, and in the hush which follows, comes the strength of an 
unlift; and in the fruit of that uplift may be found what the gentle 
Humor is, where it lies engraven only on the hearts of the thousands 
and millions of mankind. 

Some there are who know it, value it, this sense of Humor ; and thus 
appreciating its rarity and its worth, can read the human definition and 
make the saving sense a part of themselves and their lives. They see 
the wide panorama of the universe unrolling before their eyes ; now 
charming with ease and happiness, or glowing with joy and mirth, and 
now sad, with sorrow, failure and mahap disappointment; see it from 
a different perspective from those who do not possess this happy faculty 
of Humor; see it with the same shadows, though different lights. Yet 
what an enormous change it makes, this viewpoint ! Those who have it 
are said to make the discovery in this world that things are not always 
as they seem. They get a glimpse of something that is going on behind 
the scene, and their smile is very disconcerting to the sober spectators 
around them. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 247 

It is just as if life was a sort of puzzle picture, and they were told to 
find the hidden object in a very ordinary, commonplace scene; or an 
exceptionally thrilling, eventful, or unusual one. What the hidden 
object is it does not matter really. It might be a man, a dog, a hat, or 
an umbrella. An umbrella, whose handle probably, was cleverly hidden 
to a casual observer, or to others more intent even, by being at the same 
time, the arm of a chair, or the leg of a table. At any rate there the 
handle is ; and there, too, it is absolutely lost to some people ; namely, 
those without Humor ; it simply does not exist ; it is not on their map 
of vision; they may look and look, and keep on looking, but the object 
continues to be only the arm of a chair or the leg of a table, and not 
an umbrella at all. 

So these same people, without Humor fail to find an umbrella of fun 
in real life. And if they only could see it, even for a brief season, they 
might by catching it for an instant, shield themselves for a time at least 
from the weary flatness of the round of daily life ; the endless repetition 
of its stale trivialities ; the continual monotony of scenes and faces ; and 
the dull, grey, hum-drum existence, which is so infinitely tiresome, and 
harder to bear than the heaviest downpour from a leaden sky. But — 
they miss that protective covering; and so, too often, become soaked, 
saturated, and aye, even the very air around them becomes permeated 
with the fatigue and ennui which they radiate. 

Thus, having created an atmosphere of boredom, they can not escape 
its encircling folds, and so we find the non-humorists, as might be 
expected, guilty of the sin of taking facts for mere facts ; of seeing people 
from one standpoint; and of reading poetry or romance, and analyzing 
it only by the light of common sense. 

They are campers, who, toiling slowly and painfully up the mountain 
side, look back, but fail to appreciate the magnificence of the distant 
view, because of the physical discomforts which have tired them. Or, 
when their destination is reached, and their camp made, they see no 
beauty in the roaring fire of giant logs, because — the smoke annoys 
them ; breakfast strip on the end of a stick, held over the glowing coals, 
has no charm for them, because — it's smutty ; coffee loses its flavor out of 
a tin cup (which their next-door neighbor is probably waiting for) . It 



248 The St. Mary's Muse. 



is a cool, cairn, night, and the moon is certainly doing her share to make 
it beautiful and fair ; but, the blankets they are lying on do not keep a 
root or two from jabbing in their backs. And roots are unromantic. 
As for singing or telling stories, why their feet are wet and uncomfort- 
able; their feet are wet; yes, their feet are wet. Life is just such a 
comfortless, stern reality to some people. 

Likewise Mrs. X has a reception and our friends who lack the sense 
of what's ridiculous, are compelled by the Medo Persian laws of society 
to go and make themselves agreeable ; which they proceed to do in a 
most perfunctory manner. It is a hot day, and inconvenient time, and 
there are swarms and swarms of people ; each edging in or out as the case 
may be; each feeling exactly as the other does about wishing she were 
somewhere else, and yet all bowing and smiling in an absent-minded sort 
of way, or talking in a perfectly expressionless manner, as if they were 
automatons and compelled to go through the motions. Mrs. X may get 
horribly mixed in her small talk and contradict herself quite flatly, and 
no one is the wiser. That is, until the Humorist comes upon the scene. 
To him this entirely conventional reception, its many guests, with their 
assumption of savoir-faire may become screamingly funny ; because, 
like youth, Humor has the happy faculty of making things either black 
or white, when as a matter of fact they are pale grey — even the pale 
grey of conventional boredom. 

And Humor not only points us to the path which leads away from this 
boredom, but it also shows us the one which branches off into a genuine 
relish for the abnormal, the unexpected, and the imperfect. The defects 
we see all around us in this work-a-day world. Engene Field says 
"there is mud in the street ; there is a lady crossing the street ; she has 
on red stockings ; let us all give three cheers for the mud !" Can we 
imagine the non-humorist joining in the cheer right heartily? JNo ! for 
alas, they are too busy thinking, "What a shame these streets are in 
such a condition ; what can the city officials be thinking of ?" 

So it is, that they are continually finding mud, or more disagreeable 
things even, on their daily road. They become accustomed to attribute 
the defects we see around us to a cruel fate, stern and unrelenting; 
while the Humorist laughs in his sleeve when he sees his relatives and 



The St. Mary's Muse. 249 

friends, and even himself, acting precisely as they do not want to do, 
and being judged by the world accordingly. He is like a round peg 
pushed into a square hole ; but he laughs, and the more he can laugh the 
better he will fit. Charles II wandered over Europe for awhile, and 
when he returned to England, and was being urged to the same rash 
measures which had sent his father to the block, replied, "Brother, I 
am too old to go on my travels again; you may if you choose it." And 
the merry monarch remained at home. His sober brother traveled. 

Then, too, think of wobbling around where you are not at all pleased 
to be, and missing the pure delicious fun of seeing yourself. Imagine 
taking yourself as seriously as does one of James Austen's characters ! 
But who, however, would not love to be a lady of Cranford, if you could 
just recognize yourself as one ? 

How different is Shakespeare's Malvolio, who took himself quite 
seriously, though no one else did, from Sir John Falstaff, who, rascal 
though he was, yet rascal we forgive, took nothing seriously, not even 
honor ; and by a most ingenious course of reasoning declared that honor 
was a mere scutcheon, and therefore he'd have none of it. 

So it is, that while the world would despise Falstaff, for his moral 
character; or rather for his lack of moral character, yet it can not take 
him seriously enough even to despise ; but has been forced to acknowl- 
edge that through this sense of Humor, Shakespeare has created in him 
the greatest comic character of literature — a character whose inerad- 
icable Humor extricates him from every difficulty. 

And yet in Falstaff's death we are made to feel the existence of an- 
other element than that of Humor. We divine the touch of a more deli- 
cate and elusive quality. Even that sympathy which is often the basis 
of Humor, and which, as it softens our feelings toward Sir John, makes 
us feel, also, the underlying sorrow which is the burden of many and 
many a song humanity is forced to sing. Yes, "some things are of the 
nature to make one's fancy chuckle, while his heart doth ache." And 
often it is, "the heart that is soonest awake to the flowers, is the first to 
be touched by the thorns." For he who would have true sympathy must 
first feel the pricks of others himself ; and then, and then only, can he 
understand, and hope by a long apprenticeship to attain the gentlest, 



250 The St. Mary's Muse. 



finest, and most priceless gift of sympathy. And perhaps if we hunt for 
examples of men who have this sympathy we should find many living 
around us now ; but seeking through the records of men's lives in the 
past we find a striking illustration in Charles Lamb, who is so inti- 
mately revealed to us in his "Essays of Elia." Surely no one could be 
found with a more delicious, subtle Humor than Lamb, or a more far- 
reaching sympathy ; quick to respond to fluttering fears, biting pain, or 
deeper, quivering agonies ; ever on the alert to read, beneath the appa- 
rent littleness, that world-pain which coexists with world-comedy ; as it 
did in his own life. Ever understanding, because ever conscious that 
"we laugh when our souls are the saddest, and shroud all our griefs in 
a smile." 



Valedictory 

How paltry and insignificant are words when all of us feel so much ! 

If it were only true that "from the fullness of the heart the tongue 
speaketh," then might the Seniors be rivals of Patrick Henry today ; as 
it is, we needs must make use of one of the simplest, one of the home- 
liest words in the whole English language — we needs must say good-bye ; 
good-bye to you — good-bye to St. Mary's, to all that that name includes, 
to all those whom in after years we shall recall whenever we hear the 
name — St. Mary's. 

Oh, we are sorry to leave ! Sorry to leave everything here — even the 
discordant j anglings of the practice halls would be harmonies to the 
Seniors today. Sorry to leave everybody here — from the head of the 
faculty down to little Cicely Brown. Yes, the hearts of the Seniors are 
sad today, and will you consider it another proof of the "inconsistency 
of woman" if, with the next breath, I say — the hearts of the Seniors are 
glad today ? Glad ! Glad because the training we have received here, 
the ideals and standards we found here and have taken for our own, 
have instilled in us the desire to grow, to develop, to move forward; 
have given to us as ours the motto, "En AvantP 

May we cherish this motto and make it essentially and vitally con- 
nected with the record of the class of 1912 as alumnae in whatsoever 
field of interest our influences may be thrown. May we ever uphold 



The St. Mary's Muse. 251 



the enterprises of this institution, may we never detract from the good 
name of our sister students, and above all, wherever we are, may we 
ever keep that for which St. Mary's has always stood above all else — 
may ke keep the Faith! 

At last, today when we say good-bye, let us remember that the French 
would not use that word. It is not farewell that we would be saying — 
not good-bye forever. If every Senior among us does not return to 
visit St. Mary's in person, in memory all of us will make frequent and 
exhaustive sojourns with all of you and with all of you at St. Mary's. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

("Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - -< Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(.Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 

President .... Mrs. A. W. Knox, Raleigh. 

Vice-President ... - Mrs. Herbert W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

Field Secretary ... Miss Anna N. Buxton, Winston-Salem. 

The Present Status of Alumnae Affairs 



A Brief Report of the May Meeting of the St. Mary's Alumnae. 

As provided by the Constitution of the Alumnae Association, the 
Annual Meeting of the Alumnae was held at St. Mary's, during Com- 
mencement. This meeting of 1912 was the Thirty-third Annual Meet- 
ing and was held in the School Parlor on Monday, May 27th, begin- 
ning at 4:00 o'clock. In the absence of the President, Mrs. A. W. 
Knox (Eliza Smedes), of Raleigh, who was detained by illness, the 
Vice-President, Mrs. H. W. Jackson (Annie Philips, '84), of Rich- 
mond, presided. 

The roll-call was dispensed with, and after the reading of the min- 
utes of the 1911 meeting by the Secretary, Miss Kate McKimmon, 
the annual report of the Alumnae Council was presented by Miss 
Annie Root, '03, of the Council. The Council reported that it had 
acted upon Alumnae business as occasion arose and had met when it 
deemed it necessary. In September the Council accepted the resigna- 
tion of Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger as Treasurer and elected Mrs. Ernest 
Cruikshank (Margaret M. Jones, '96) to fill the vacancy. ~No other 
action binding the Association was taken during the year. The Coun- 
cil had heard informally that the Chapters in ISTew York, Baltimore, 
Asheville, and especially in Raleigh, had accomplished effective work, 
and wished to mention especially the work of the Raleigh Chapter in 
raising some $200 for the Scholarship Fund by an Alumnae play. 

The Council made several definite recommendations to the Associa- 
tion all of which were discussed and then approved. 

(1) It asked authority to invest the Scholarship Funds in hand in 



The St. Mary's Muse. 253 

St. Mary's 6% bonds instead of having' them remain in the Savings 
Bank at 4%, so soon as $2,000 was in hand. 

(2) It asked authority to call upon the Chapters and Alunmse for 
cooperation in raising at least $1,000 toward the Scholarship Fund 
during the coming year in amounts from $1 to $10. 

(3) It asked for the division of the work of Traveling Secretary. 
That a Traveling Secretary be appointed to work in the East, and 
another to work in the West, with Raleigh as the dividing line. 

(4) It called the attention of the Association to Bishop Cheshire's 
appeal to his diocese for cooperation in raising the St. Mary's debt, 
and asked the Association to pledge the support of the Alumna? to 
Bishop Cheshire in whatever steps may be taken toward the end in 
view. 

(5) It asked the Association to reiterate its pledge of loyal support 
to the Rector in his work in carrying on the work of the school, and 
sought to impress upon the Alumnse generally the need of a more earnest 
individual support. 

In conclusion the report stated that the Council felt encouraged at 
the outlook and would encourage the Association while asking the 
Alumna? by united effort to make the coming year the best in the his- 
tory of the Association. 

The Treasurer's report showed $437.36 added to the funds during 
the year, of which $57.50 was dues, $49.69 interest, and $251, the 
Raleigh Chapter's donation to the Scholarship Fund. The actual 
amount on hand at the time of the meeting was $1,912.39. 

The Nominating Committee, by its Chairman, Mrs. Wm. E. Shipp 
(Margaret Busbee) recommended officers for the ensuing year, who 
were elected : Mrs. Winston, President ; Mrs. Frank Wood (Rebecca 
Collins, '82), Vice-President; Miss McKimmon, Secretary, and Mrs. 
Cruikshank, Treasurer. The new members of the Council for three 
years : Mrs. H. W. Jackson, of Richmond, Va., and Mrs. W. E. Lind- 
say (Ella Tew, '79), of Spartanburg, S. C. 

The Association elected as Traveling Secretaries, Miss Anna Bux- 
ton, of Winston-Salem, for the West, and Miss Annie Root, '03, of 
Raleigh, for the East, and instructed them to arrange if possible to 



254 The St. Mary's Muse. 



make two trips, of a fortnight's duration each, in their respective terri- 
tories in October next, as their work for the year. 

The Association endorsed the request of the New York and Raleigh 
Chapters to ask the Board of Trustees to take steps to provide for two 
women to serve as Trustees. A resolution to this effect was presented 
to the Trustees in their annual meeting who replied that the appoint- 
ment of Trustees was invested by the Charter in the Conventions of 
the respective Dioceses and there was therefore nothing which they 
could do. 



The Annual Report of the Treasurer of the St. Mary's 

Alumnae Association. 

From September, 1911, to May 27, 1912. 
Receipts; 

Received of Mrs. Pittenger, retiring Treasurer (in bank).. $1,319.19 

Pledges paid since October 7th $ 60.25 

Funds paid as dues by members General Association 14.50 

Raleigh Chapter, Scholarship Fund 251.00 

Raleigh Chapter, dues 30.00 

New York Chapter Scholarship Fund 28.25 

New York Chapter dues 6.00 

Chapel Hill Chapter dues 7.00 

Returned expense funds Miss M. Henderson 20.00 

Returned loan R. B. Owen 100.00 

Accrued interest 40.36 

Total funds added in bank 557.36 

Total amount in bank this date $1,876.55 

Cash interest, R. B. Owen $ 9.33 

Cash from Mrs. Pittenger, expense account 5.00 

Cash dues Raleigh Chapter, 1912-'13 23.50 

Expenditures • $ 37.83 

Cash for stamps 1-00 

Net cash on hand 36.83 

Total Alumnae Funds on hand $1,912.38 

Amount unpaid on pledges, all overdue $441.75 

In the hands of Miss McVea 310.00 

Loan due June 1st 50.00 



READ !— M ARK !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
to advertise in The Mtjse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 

Ready-tO'Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls. 



Fayetteville 
Street 




St. Mary's Seal Stationery, 

St. Mary's Seal Pins, 

St. Mary's Pennants 

St. Mary's Calendars, 

May be had by writing to The Muse. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 

9999 fe€ w 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



' It's worth the difference " 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



1 Workers in Artistic Photography" 



Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 


127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 


131 Faye'teville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


Insurance Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 


The Mechanics Savings Bank 


COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

KALEIGH, N. C. 


THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOTS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



WHY NOT? 

The verse you write 
You say is written; 

All rules despite, 
But not despitten. 

The gas you light 
Is never litten. 

The things you drank 
Were doubtless drunk; 

The boy you spank 
Is never spunk. 

A friend you thank 
But never thunk. 



NORFOLK 

OYST E R S 

DAILY 
Wade's Fish Market 

113 E. Martin St. Both Phones 356 


J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 


H. T. HICKS & COMPANY 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks 


Good Things Always at 

BRETCHE'S BAKERY 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Advertisements. 



WHY IS 



Brantley's Fountain 

The Most Popular? 

ASK THE GIRLS 



POOL & CROCKER 

up-to-date 
FOOTWEAR 

Special Attention to Fit 
105 Fayette ville St. 

CARVER'S STABLES 

HARNESS AND SADDLE HORSES 
Phone 229 117 E. Davie St. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 



CHAS. E. JOHNSON, 
President. 

G. H. DORTCH, 
Secretary. 



A. A. THOMPSON, 
Treasurer. 

R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Suppose you speak, 
Then you have spoken; 

But if you sneak 

You have not snoken. 

The shoes that squeak 
Have never squoken. 

A dog will bite, 

Likewise has bitten 
With all his might, 

But not his mitten. 
You fly your kite, 

But not your kitten. 



. ROSENTHAL the boylan-pearge go. 



HO. 



GROCERS 



Dress Goods, Silks, Coat 
Suits, White Goods, Linens, 
Embroideries, Millinery, Car- 
pets and Upholstering, 
Trunks, Bags and Suit-cases 



BOYLAN-PEARCE COMPANY 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT ST8. j 216 and 218 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

i 



Advertisements. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
College Postals 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 


CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 

Both Phones:] 2 2fi 


MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK 
OP RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital 8100,000.00 4 per cent paid in Savings 

Department 
E. C. Duncan, Pres. W. B. Drake, Jr., Cash. 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 
BEST 


E. M. UZZELL & CO. 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

only high grade work 

Raleigh, North Carolina 


ICE 
CREAM 

Phone 123 Cor. Salisbury & Hargett Sts. 


C. E. HARTGE 

Architect 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All kinds of Keys. Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all makes repaired 



A teacher in a Connecticut country school gave one of her pupils these two 
sentences to correct: 

1. "The hen has three legs." 

2. "Who done it?" 

The little fellow looked at his slate a minute and then wrote seriously: "It 
wan't the hen's fault; God done it." — Ex. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK, J. T. PULLEN 
Pres., Chas. Root, Cashier. Capital and Surplus 
$75,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


THE HOTEL RALEIGH 

INVITES YOUR PATRONAGE 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 


ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 



Chas. E. Johnson F. H. Briggs 


"' 


PRESIDENT CASHIER 


«J-SIL.||H^f7|p«~y 


THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 

"round steps bank" SINCE 1865 

WE APPRECIATE OLD FRIENDS 

AND 

WELCOME THE NEW 
4% Time Certificates of Deposit Call at the Bank 


^^■S^WF 


Jolly &■ Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 


THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 


It will well pay you to buy your Ready-to-Wear 
Garments at our store because we sell better goods 
for less money The Fashion 203-205 Fayetteville St. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 


PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 

109 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 


J. R. FERRALL & COMPANY-GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 

222 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



My friend, have you heard of the town of Yawn, 

On the banks of the River Slow, 
Where blooms the wait-a-while flower fair, 
Where the some-time-or-other scents the air, 

And the soft go-easy grow? 

It lies in the valley of What's-the-Use, 

In the province of Let-her-Slide — 
That Tired Feeling is native there; 
It's the home of the listless and I'don't care, 

Where the Put-it-off abide. 



WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 


ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 


Dr. L. J. PEGRAM 

DENTIST 
Office 209% Fayetteville St. RALEIGH, N. C. 


Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 


Dr. V. E. TURNER 

DENTIST 


DR. ERNEST H. BROUGHTON, DENTIST 

116 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


Dr. M. C. HORTON 

DENTIST 


DR. E. B. HOWLE 

DENTIST 


GREEN & WATSON Art Store 
11 West Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

MUSIC HOUSE 


WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
217^ Fayetteville Street Phone 953-R 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 


N. H. MOORE 
Repairer of Fine Shoes E. Hargett Street 


CARDWELL'S 
ALL KINDS OF CLEANING AND PRESSING 


BRIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. O Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
out-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new Jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



THE DEMOCRAT 

TENNESSEE'S GREATEST NEWSPAPER 

Accurate Market Reports All the World's Happenings 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

71st ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 19, 1912. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 23, 1913. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ *• THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these ( &• THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: j ^ THE ABT SCE QOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

In 1911-12 were enrolled 250 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Facultj^. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



, 




/